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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Layne shook his head, and Kallie caught a whiff of sweet orange and musky sandal-wood from his dreads.

    Black Dust Mambo

  • The slender uchigatana was shabby beside its opulent companion, its sheath of sandal-wood marked only with fading paint, its hilt fashioned from a worn knob of bone…

    Mini-interview: C.L. Werner |

  • Having thus in a manner talked himself up to an idea of his own high authority, he cut the strings of the packet which he had all this while held in his hand, and, undoing the outer coveflngs, produced a very small case made of sandal-wood.

    Anne of Geierstein

  • Khalanj285, lign-aloes and sandal-wood, plated with red gold, and studded with all manner emeralds and costly gems fit for seal rings.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So saying, he arose and pulling up425 half a score of the doors of the palace, which were of sandal-wood and lign-aloes with nails of gold and silver, bound them together with ropes of silk and floss426-silk and fine linen and wrought of them

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Quoth the townsman, “He blundered who told thee that; for we burn nothing under our cooking-pots save sandal-wood, whose worth with us is but that of fuel.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Al – Saláhitah,35 which aboundeth in sandal-wood when the captain cast anchor, — And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased saying her permitted say.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Accordingly he guided me to the market-street, where I found that he had taken in pieces the raft which carried me and which was of sandal-wood and I heard the broker calling it for sale. —

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • When the townsman saw the merchant looking at him, he asked, “Wilt thou sell me thy sandal-wood for a measure245 of whatever thy soul shall desire?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Said the sharper, “I can do nothing of the kind;” and, confessing himself beaten, returned him his sandal-wood and redeemed himself from him with an hundred sequins, to be off his bargain.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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