self-ignorance love

Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Ignorance of one's own character, powers, and limitations.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He identifies with that self-image and refuses (probably out of fearfulness and the restraints of a personality disorder) to step out of the darkness of his self-ignorance. '

    Uncovering the Psychological Roots of the Bush Tragedy

  • He identifies with that self-image and refuses (probably out of fearfulness and the restraints of a personality disorder) to step out of the darkness of his self-ignorance.

    Uncovering the Psychological Roots of the Bush Tragedy

  • Joseph Butler, in his well-known sermon “On Self-Deceit”, emphasizes the ways in which self-deception about one's moral character and conduct, ˜self-ignorance™ driven by inordinate ˜self-love ', not only facilitates vicious actions but hinders the agent's ability to change by obscuring them from view.

    Self-Deception

  • But to write from this point of self-ignorance is to send out a false report.

    One tiny more thing on Frey

  • Inertia, as an expression of a constitutional ignorance, is perhaps a thing that can well comprise the tendencies of a mass in self-ignorance, and therefore can establish other atavistic habits compressed in a human frame, the habits which it only carries and cherishes in the night of the soul in self-evolution.

    The Transformation Of Physical Inertia

  • Human self-ignorance mirrors the divine self-ignorance; human incomprehensibility mirrors divine incomprehensibility.

    John Scottus Eriugena

  • He moves from darkness into the light, from self-ignorance into self-knowledge.

    John Scottus Eriugena

  • We ourselves possess beauty when we are true to our own being; our ugliness is in going over to another order; our self-knowledge, that is to say, is our beauty; in self-ignorance we are ugly.

    The Six Enneads.

  • Imagine living gold: it files away all that is earthy about it, all that kept it in self-ignorance preventing it from knowing itself as gold; seen now unalloyed it is at once filled with admiration of its worth and knows that it has no need of any other glory than its own, triumphant if only it be allowed to remain purely to itself.

    The Six Enneads.

  • The Small-minded man, for instance, being really worthy of good deprives himself of his deserts, and seems to have somewhat faulty from not having a sufficiently high estimate of his own desert, in fact from self-ignorance: because, but for this, he would have grasped after what he really is entitled to, and that is good.

    Ethics

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