Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Used as a courtesy title for a married woman in an Italian-speaking area, equivalent to Mrs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Mrs; madam; title of address or respect for women in Italy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Madam; Mrs; -- a title of address or respect among the Italians.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An Italian title of address or respect for a woman, equivalent to Madam, Mrs.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an Italian title of address equivalent to Mrs. when used before a name
  • n. an Italian title or form of address for a married woman

Etymologies

Italian, feminine of signore, signore; see signore.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Italian (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "Well, signora, is it not true that now you have had enough of me?"

    The Miracles of Antichrist: A Novel

  • "But it will be in English, signora; and that I can not read."

    The Lure of the Mask

  • In fact, the signora was a sort of lion, and though there was no drop of the

    Barchester Towers

  • Barchester had hitherto afforded to her web, and the signora was a powerful spider that made wondrous webs and could in no way live without catching flies.

    Barchester Towers

  • "You must know that the friends of the signora are my friends and that I am always glad to welcome them."

    The Call of the Blood

  • The maid had called her signora; but that might have been a disguise, like the mask and the patches of court-plaster.

    The Lure of the Mask

  • The signora is my second wife; she is prima donna assoluta of the grand opera, Naples.

    The Martian

  • In fact, the signora was a sort of lion; and though there was no drop of the Leohunter blood in Miss Thorne's veins, she nevertheless did like to see attractive people at her house.

    Barchester Towers

  • He was the finest fly that Barchester had hitherto afforded to her web, and the signora was a powerful spider that made wondrous webs, and could in no way live without catching flies.

    Barchester Towers

  • A few days after, they brought the intelligence that Barbarina had returned; and the councillor dwelt with her in her new house; and the servants were commanded to call the signora Madame Cocceji. as she was his well-beloved and trusted wife.

    Berlin and Sans-Souci; or Frederick the Great and his friends

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