Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. lively, full of energy

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Quick; lively; alert.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Sprightly; lively; brisk; alert.

Etymologies

From Old Norse sprækr 'lively', from Proto-Indo-European *sp(h)er(e)g- 'to strew, sprinkle'. More at spark. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • For hear Allhighest sprack for krischnians as for propagana fidies and his nuptial eagles sharped their beaks of prey: and every morphyl man of us, pome by pome, falls back into this terrine: as it was let it be, says he!

    Finnegans Wake

  • But though a _sprack_ lad, and fond of pleasure and its haunts, Harry Wakefield was steady, and not the cautious Robin Oig M'Combich himself was more attentive to the main chance.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 280, October 27, 1827

  • Several members of the Austen family besides Jane were endowed with this faculty of invention - a faculty termed by Mrs. Austen "sprack wit."

    Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends

  • He observed, that "master was looking sprack agin; and warn't this a tidy room, like?"

    John Halifax, Gentleman

  • John, like a great red-limbed overgrown moon-calf; and now here you are as sprack a squire and as lusty an archer as ever passed down the highway from Bordeaux, while I am still the same old Samkin Aylward, with never a change, save that I have a few more sins on my soul and a few less crowns in my pouch.

    The White Company

  • Burton's Anatomia hath it, a phrenesiac or lethargic patient, you would wonder where he hath sae suddenly acquired all this fine sprack festivity and jocularity.

    The Waverley

  • "Thee'll be a sprack man yet, Gearge," said the windmiller, encouragingly.

    Jan of the Windmill

  • "If you're small, you're sprack," said the miller's man.

    Jan of the Windmill

  • He observed that "master was looking sprack agin; and warn't this a tidy room, like?"

    John Halifax, Gentleman

  • If your Royal Highness had seen him dreaming and dozing about the banks of Tully-Veolan like an hypochondriac person, or, as Burton's ANATOMIA hath it, a phrenesiac or lethargic patient, you would wonder where he hath sae suddenly acquired all this fine sprack festivity and jocularity.

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

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