Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An ancient Greek covered walk or colonnade, usually having columns on one side and a wall on the other.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. In Ancient Greece, a walkway with a roof supported by colonnades, often with a wall on one side; a portico.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek architecture, a portico, usually a detached portico, often of considerable extent, generally near a public place to afford opportunity for walking or conversation under shelter. The Greek stoa was often richly adorned with sculpture and painting. Many examples had two stories.

Etymologies

Greek, porch; see stā- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Ancient Greek στοά (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Crawley’s translation of the Greek word stoa, as “porch” is misleading.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • A sect of Greek philosophers at Athens, so called from the Greek word stoa i.e., a "porch" or "portico," where they have been called "the Pharisees of Greek paganism."

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • As we've previously noted, John Lydon is consecrated to very simple "stoa":

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • Johnny Rotten's true creed (or "stoa", if you will) has always been:

    Archive 2007-07-01

  • ——A curved wall (e) along the water side, with many niches: before it was a row of large columns, of which four remain, but without capitals, I conjecture this to have been a kind of stoa, or public walk; it does not communicate with any other edifice.

    Travels in Syria and the Holy Land

  • SL: I guess that 'stoa' refers to stoicism, but what does it say about your own perception and vision of life?

    Side-Line news feed

  • A temple (d), of which a part of the side walls, and a niche in the back wall are remaining; there are no ornaments either on the walls, or about the niche. — — A curved wall (e) along the water side, with many niches: before it was a row of large columns, of which four remain, but without capitals, I conjecture this to have been a kind of stoa, or public walk; it does not communicate with any other edifice. —

    Travels in Syria and the Holy Land

  • [Footnote 1: The Stoics took their name from the 'stoa', or portico in the

    Cicero Ancient Classics for English Readers

  • This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. stoa incorporate truth nobly act laugh and inspire

    Your Right Hand Thief

  • The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held.

    Stoicism

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