Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The connective tissue framework of an organ, gland, or other structure, as distinguished from the tissues performing the special function of the organ or part.
  • n. The spongy, colorless framework of a red blood cell or other cell.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the tissue structure of an organ, etc., that serves to support it

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. The connective tissue or supporting framework of an organ.
  • n. The spongy, colorless framework of a red blood corpuscle or other cell.
  • n. A layer or mass of cellular tissue, especially that part of the thallus of certain fungi which incloses the perithecia.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In anatomy: The sustentacular tissue or substance of a part or organ, usually of connective tissue.
  • n. In botany: In fungi, a variously shaped more or less continuous layer of cellular tissue, in which perithecia or other organs of fructification are immersed. Sometimes called receptacle. See cut under ergot.
  • n. In vegetable physiology, the solid matter remaining after all the fluid has been expressed from protoplasm.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the dense colorless framework of a chloroplast
  • n. a mass of fungal tissue that has spore-bearing structures embedded in it or on it
  • n. the supporting tissue of an organ (as opposed to parenchyma)

Etymologies

Late Latin strōma, mattress, covering, from Greek, bed.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin stromat- ("bed covering"), from Ancient Greek στρώμα (strōma, "bed"), from στόρνυμι (stornymi, "to stretch out") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • After age 40, the changes in the breasts become more pronounced, as fatty tissue begins to replace the supportive, fibrous tissue known as the stroma, and skin starts to sag more — regardless of whether a woman has had kids, and nursed them, or not.

    Mommy Wants Her Body Back

  • The stroma is a peculiar soft tissue, abundantly supplied with bloodvessels, consisting for the most part of spindle-shaped cells with a small amount of ordinary connective tissue.

    XI. Splanchnology. 3d. 1. The Ovaries

  • Fibroblasts are found in connective tissue, which includes cartilage and the cellular matrix known as stroma that provides support to body structures, such as organs, glands and also tumors.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • Then the scientists add supporting cells - known as stroma - and various factors that mimic their natural environment, positioning them where they can most effectively support the liver cells.

    HHMI News

  • Few years ago, Funderburgh and his colleagues identified stem cells in a layer of the cornea called the stroma, and they recently showed that even after many rounds of expansion in the lab, these cells continued to produce the biochemical components, or matrix, of the cornea.

    dailyindia.com News Feed

  • A few years ago, Dr. Funderburgh and other University of Pittsburgh researchers identified stem cells in a layer of the cornea called the stroma, and they recently showed that even after many rounds of expansion in the lab, these cells continued to produce the biochemical components, or matrix, of the cornea.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Grana are connected to each other & surrounded by a gel-like material called stroma

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Thylakoid disks are stacked separate compartments also called the stroma participants in the light-independent reactions none of these

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • The substance of the cell nucleus then remains behind with some of the associated "stroma", as an insoluble mass.

    Albrecht Kossel - Nobel Lecture

  • From this germ epithelium strings of cells grow out into the connective tissue or "stroma" of the ovary (Figure 2.403 b).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 2

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