Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • According to Mourt's Relation, "he came safely home, though weary and surbated," that is, foot-sore.

    Cape Cod

  • The fresh leaves alone applied to the naked soal of the foot, infinitely refresh the surbated traveller.

    Sylva, Vol. 1 (of 2) Or A Discourse of Forest Trees

  • “An I might advise,” continued Bucklaw, who was now in his element, and desirous of assuming the whole management, “as the hounds are surbated and weary, the head of the stag should be cabaged in order to reward them; and if I may presume to speak, the huntsman, who is to break up the stag, ought to drink to your good ladyship’s health

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • They had been lost in the woods, where they had wandered surbated, and had been terrified by the roar of "Lyons," and had met wolves that "sat on thier tayles and grinned" at them; they had been half frozen in their poorly built houses; had been famished, or sickened with unwonted and unpalatable food; their common house had burned down, half their company was dead -- they had borne sore sorrows, and equal trials were to come.

    Customs and Fashions in Old New England

  • But this much I will say to you; I have no such power in this matter as you suppose and cannot therefore do for you that which were behoving; however, an you will promise me, upon your solemn and surbated [403] faith, to keep it me secret, I will tell you the means you must use and meseemeth certain that, with such fine books and other gear as you tell me you have, you will gain your end. '

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

  • The latter recounts that "the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapour, continu'd so intense, that my haire was almost sing'd, and my feete unsuffurably surbated.

    Royalty Restored

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