Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A temporary cessation or suspension of hostilities by agreement of the opposing sides; an armistice.
  • n. A respite from a disagreeable state of affairs.
  • transitive v. To end or be ended with a truce.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a period of time in which no fighting takes place due to an agreement between the opposed parties
  • n. an agreement between opposed parties in which they pledge to cease fighting for a limited time

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A suspension of arms by agreement of the commanders of opposing forces; a temporary cessation of hostilities, for negotiation or other purpose; an armistice.
  • n. Hence, intermission of action, pain, or contest; temporary cessation; short quiet.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An intermission of hostilities; specifically, a temporary cessation or suspension of hostilities mutually agreed upon by the commanders of two opposing forces, generally for some stipulated period, to admit of negotiation, or for some other purpose.
  • n. Respite; temporary quiet or intermission of action, pain, contest, or the like.
  • n. Reconciliation; peace.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a state of peace agreed to between opponents so they can discuss peace terms

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English trewes, pl. of trewe, treaty, pledge, from Old English trēow; see deru- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English trewes, triwes, trues, plural of trewe, triewe, true ‘faithfulness, assurance, pact’, from Old English trēowa, singularized plural of trēowe, from Proto-Germanic *trewwō (compare Dutch trouw, German Treue, Danish tro), noun form of *trewwjaz ‘trusty, faithful’. More at true.

Examples

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