Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A variant of tie-wig.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now the chapter I was obliged to tear out, was the description of this cavalcade, in which Corporal Trim and Obadiah, upon two coach-horses a - breast, led the way as slow as a patrole — whilst my uncle Toby, in his laced regimentals and tye-wig, kept his rank with my father, in deep roads and dissertations alternately upon the advantage of learning and arms, as each could get the start. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Now the chapter I was obliged to tear out, was the description of this cavalcade, in which Corporal Trim and Obadiah, upon two coach-horses a-breast, led the way as slow as a patrole — whilst my uncle Toby, in his laced regimentals and tye-wig, kept his rank with my father, in deep roads and dissertations alternately upon the advantage of learning and arms, as each could get the start. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Never mind the bend-sinister, said my uncle Toby, putting on his tye-wig. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Let my old tye-wig, quoth my uncle Toby, and my laced regimentals, be hung to the fire all night, Trim.

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • -- He took Miss Powis on his knee; -- call'd her a hundred times his dear, dear daughter; -- and I could not forbear laughing, when he told her he had not wore a tye-wig before these twenty years.

    Barford Abbey

  • Mr. Radcliffe was dressed in mourning, and had, according to his own subsequent account to a fellow prisoner in Newgate, a "brown tye-wig."

    Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745 Volume III.

  • All gray he was, and the sun glistened on his gray tye-wig as he waited.

    Gallantry Dizain des Fetes Galantes

  • The remark of Mandeville, who, when he had passed an evening in his company, declared that he was a parson in a tye-wig, can detract little from his character; he was always reserved to strangers, and was not incited to uncommon freedom by a character like that of Mandeville.

    Life of Addison, 1672-1719

  • [842] 'The physicians in Hogarth's prints are not caricatures: the full dress with a sword and a great tye-wig, and the hat under the arm, and the doctors in consultation, each smelling to a gold-headed cane shaped like a parish-beadle's staff, are pictures of real life in his time, and myself have seen a young physician thus equipped walk the streets of London without attracting the eyes of passengers.'

    Life of Johnson

  • Upon Cookery M. Rouquet is edifying; and concerning the eighteenth-century physician, with his tye-wig and gilt-head cane, sprightly and not unmalicious.

    De Libris: Prose and Verse

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