Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A written collection of all words derived from a particular source, or sharing some other characteristic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I don't know what "wordlist" is, but I assume you want some kind of dictionary or list of words in the English language.

    doggdot.us

  • Well, by “trivial” I mean “trivial when someone else has already written a really solid algorithm for brute-forcing a ciphertext with a probability-weighted wordlist, and you can just use their code.”

    Solution to the Fringe Glyph Cipher

  • The volume is considered the first English dictionary in the modern sense – an alphabetical wordlist with definitions – and it predates Dr Samuel Johnson's Dictionary by 150 years.

    'I wrote 2U B4'! British Library shows up textspeak as soooo 19th century

  • I think one of the keys to think about the whole EIL is that the “internationalization”–not by linguists developing a core wordlist but by spekaers using the languages–of English is a self-generating, self-directed process.

    “Who CARES what English people have for breakfast?” My contribution to the culture debate… « Ken Wilson's Blog

  • It will then take you to the new screen with the new wordlist.

    Food Allergy Wordlists

  • You will automatically be taken to another screen with a two-page. pdf of the wordlist.

    Food Allergy Wordlists

  • If they are stored as lists of basic VM ops, and handles are just indices into a table, we can produce the final image by finding the start word in the wordlist, then tracing recursively through the subroutines it references until we get to primitives, compiling them to the target's ROM image as we go.

    Snell-Pym » HYDROGEN: Bootstrapping

  • Alpher and Nash 1999 in the Australian Journal of Linguistics didn't find huge lexical replacement in Guugu Yimidhirr between Cook's wordlist in 1770 and recent fieldwork.

    languagehat.com: LINKING LANGUAGES.

  • Fellow language geeks may find it an interesting exercise to try their hand at extracting grammar information from the wordlist, which Blench gives a copy of actually he says they're "available from the author at r.blench@odi.org.uk", before reading on...

    languagehat.com: MPRE.

  • "He never saw the wordlist, Everybody else knew the words on the list."

    The Cat Who Sang For The Birds

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