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  • As hither is mixed up with thither

    And whence is confounded with wither,

    If you would compose

    Faux biblical prose

    Prepare for a sweat and a swither.

    January 20, 2018

  • (noun) - An ungenteel man; a bookseller.

    --John Awdeley's Fraternitye of Vacabondes, 1565

    January 20, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Food of liquid kind; an innovation formed on the model of edibles, which has little to recommend it, save its vulgarity.

    --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    January 20, 2018

  • (noun) - The breaking up of a school at the great holidays when the boys within bar the door against the master. Northern England.

    --Samuel Pegge's Supplement to Grose's Provincial Glossary, 1814

    January 20, 2018

  • Spotted emojiphrase Book Worm

    January 20, 2018

  • phrasal verb, to effect agonized crying or sobbing with such "ugly" displays as grimacing/facial clenching, flush, shuddering, rhinorrhea, etc. Merriam Webster did a blog post about it.

    January 19, 2018

  • I recall having tens of arguments about how to spell this in high school.

    January 19, 2018

  • To make more lively. Spoken with the ᵹ sound as in Asia, treasure and usual.

    January 19, 2018

  • cui bono, you sensibly ask,

    When lawyers so muddle their task?

    When simpler folk heard

    A latin brocard

    They bowed to the learned man’s mask

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A wood-demon who is supposed to guard over unripe nuts. "Melsh Dick'll catch thee lad," was a common threat used to frighten children going nutting.

    --Rev. Alfred Easther's Glossary of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

    (2) A sylvan goblin, the protector of hazelnuts from the depredations of mischievous boys.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A dollar, chopped or stamped with a private mark as a guarantee of its genuineness. Dollars similarly marked had currency in England in the first quarter of the last 18th century, and one of the present writers can recollect this occasional occurrence in Scotland in his childhood. The word chap is adopted in Malay with meanings of self-impression, stamp (to seal or stamp) though there is, as Mr. Walter Skeat points out, a pure native word tera, or tra, and chop has acquired the specific sense of a passport or license.

    --Col. Henry Yule's Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words, 1886

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Whatever led will may mean now, it doubtless once meant the same as will led, a phrase which occurs in a specimen of the Norfolk dialect. Will led is said to mean demented, but the original sense was bewildered. Will, in this sense, has no immediate connexion with will in the sense of "inclination," but represents the Scandinavian form of the English wild, which often had the sense of "astray, bewildered, at a loss," and the like.

    --Walter Skeat's Student's Pastime, 1896

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A salve which was supposed to cure the wound, being applied to the weapon that made it.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - An expression derived from the Royal Menagerie at the Tower of London ere the metropolis rejoiced in a Zoological Gardens, when travelling menageries were unheard of. Country visitors in town for a few days never failed at that period to feast their eyes upon a real live lion, and on returning to their homes boasted of having seen the "London Lion."

    --Trench Johnson's Phrases and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - When the clouds threaten hail or rain it is said, "There is a deal of dungow-dash to come down." From dung, filth.

    --Roger Wilbraham's Glossary of Some Words Used in Cheshire, 1826

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To dandle bounce on the knee, play with a baby.

    --J. Drummond Robertson's Glossary of Archaic Gloucestershire Words, 1890

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - So France's Charles V nicknamed the German tongue.

    --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A kind of pottage of which a mess was offered to the kings of England on their coronation day by the lord of the manor at Addington in Surrey, being the "service" by which that manor was held.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    January 19, 2018

  • October's full moon was nicknamed the "huntsman's moon" by Celtic tribes and called the "blood moon" in medieval England, as it signaled the beginning of hunting season. Eliezer Edwards' Words, Facts, and Phrases, (1882) explained the name: "Sportsmen do not hunt by moonlight. The obvious meaning therefore is hunter's month--the crop being harvested, there is nothing to interfere with the sport of the hunter."

    The anonymous English book of etiquette, Manners and Rules of Good Society (1901), offered this fine point of hunting behavior: "It is difficult to make a would-be sportsman comprehend the strict etiquette maintained between the owners of manors; that is to say, he would think nothing of crossing the boundary of his host's manor, gun in hand, if he felt inclined to follow a bird or hare he had wounded, oblivious of the fact that in the first place the greatest punctiliousness is observed between gentlemen in the matter of trespassing on each other's land when out shooting. Unless the greatest intimacy existed, a sportsman would hardly venture to pick up his dead bird if it had fallen on a neighbour's manor, and would on no account look for a wounded bird, but for a dead one only."

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To run the game down with dogs, in opposition to shooting it.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A sore or wounded leg. It is likely to be from Italian gamba, qualified by some adjective now lost, perhaps through the blunder of someone ignorant of that language . . . The term belongs to the leg only. Nobody ever had a game arm, hand, or even foot.

    --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    (2) From game, lame, crooked, deformed, disabled, injured, sore; hence gam-legged, having crooked legs; West Yorkshire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To make buttons means to look sorry and sad perhaps because button-making is a sorry occupation. Not to have all one's buttons, to be deficient in intellect.

    --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - Originally, a maker of adjuncts to armour; it became a jocular term for tailor.

    --A.V. Judges' Elizabethan Underworld, 1930

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Extremely old-fashioned; much out of date.

    --Maurice Weseen's Dictionary of American Slang, 1934

    January 19, 2018

  • Dog-flogging Day (October 18th)

    On this date in York, England, any dogs found in the streets were once subject to being whipped in commemoration of the 18th-century swallowing of consecrated wafers by a dog in the cathedral. Beginning in the 16th century, many English churches employed churchwardens, or beadles, who not only supervised the sometimes unruly canines that traditionally accompanied their owners to church but were often charged with keeping parishioners awaking during services.

    Edward Peacock's Glossary of Lincolnshire (1877) added, "In Northorpe Church until about seventy years ago, there was a small pew on the south side just within the charnel arch known as Hall Dog-pew, in which the dogs that had followed the author's grandfather and family to church were imprisoned during divine service."

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A parish official whose duties consisted in expelling any dog . . . which might intrude into the church during the performance of any service. The office usually joined with that of the sexton and pew-opener. The short, stout dog-whip was a regular part of the dog-whipper's equipment. In one Derby church, the office has existed down to the year 1861 and has become almost hereditary in one family.

    --J.C. Atkinson's Forty Years in a Moorland Parish, 1891

    January 19, 2018

  • :)

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Anything as it ought to be; a poet's muse is in tift when she sings well.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    (2) Condition, plight, humour; in tift, in proper capacity for doing anything. It might be used to denote eagerness to engage in any business.

    --John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

    (3) A slight fit of ill-humour or offendedness; a petty quarrel.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1914

    (4) Tifted up, cleansed and put into order.

    --Francis Robinson's Whitby Glossary, 1876

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Ruin, obscurity, annihilation.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    (2) When anything has made a noise for some time, and it is then quashed, it is said to have "gone to the bumwhush." This is too often the way with people of great popularity--they have their day then go to the bumwhush.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - A drunken man is sometimes said to have a "turkey on his back," perhaps the allusion to his having won one at a raffle in a drinking-place.

    --James Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1877

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - One who obtains money or goods by fraud. Catzerie is the offence.

    --William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A very expressive name for an hermaphrodite, to which it exactly answers, will being for the man and gill (with g soft) for Gillian or Juliana, on the woman's part.

    --Samuel Pegge's Alphabet of Kenticisms, 1736

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To talk in a way not generally understood.

    --George Matsell's Vocabulum, or The Rogue's Lexicon, 1859

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Introductory; from Greek eis, in, and ago, to lead.

    --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon of the English Language, c. 1850

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - Marrying eight times. Latin octo eight, and Old French gamie marriage.

    --Alois Brandl's Glossary of Middle English Literature, 1949

    January 19, 2018

  • Latin guberno.

    --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon of the English Language, c. 1850

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A slight rain by which the blades of grass are cooled and refreshed.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - One foolishly indulged.

    --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Devonshire Words, 1896

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A word of doubtful etymology, but signifying the downy plumage of a bird.

    --William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - (1) A genuine Newcastle word applied to the beauty of form, as of manners and morals, but most particularly used to describe those mild and affectionate dispositions which render the persons agreeable in the domestic state.

    --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    (2) Knowing, sagacious, judicious, prudent; wary, cautious; skillful, clever, lucky; careful, frugal; endowed with occult or magical powers.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) The jargon used by thieves, tramps, etc.

    --Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

    (2) Frenchman, any man, of any country, who cannot speak English, as anyone who does not understand East Anglian is a shireman.

    --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To divide words into syllables, specially in teaching a child to read.

    --Mairi Robinson's Concise Scots Dictionary, 1985

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A name bestowed on a crying child; from screed, to cry in a shrieking manner.

    --C. Clough Robinson's Glossary of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A slang term anciently applied to London - substituted for Cocaigne by the poets and wits of the 16th century. Lud's Town, a name sometimes anciently given to London was so called after Lud, a mythical king of England. "And on the gates of Lud's Town set your heads." Shakespeare's Cymbeline.

    --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Affectation of false sublimity.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    (2) Teratology is when bold writers, fond of the sublime, intermix something great and prodigious in everything they write, whether there be foundation for it in reason or not, that this is call'd bombast.

    --Nathaniel Bailey's Etymological English Dictionary, 1727

    (3) A discourse of prodigies and wonders.

    --Edward Phillips' New World of English Words, 1678

    (4) A marvellous tale, or collection of such tales.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1919

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) A kind of apologetical apostrophe, when anything was said that might be thought filthy or indecent. It was contracted into sa'reverence, and thence corrupted into sir- or sur-reverence, which in one instance became the substitute for the word which it introduced, as, "I trod in a sa'reverence."

    --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    (2) Used apologetically in introducing some remark that might offend the hearer. "Who, saving your reverence, is the divell himselfe." Merchant of Venice.

    --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    (3) A native woman of Devon, in describing something not particularly delicate, apologized with the phrase, "saving your reverence." This is not uncommon in the country, "saving your presence" being sometimes substituted. It occurs in Romeo and Juliet and is of great antiquity, being found in Mandeville's Travels.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - The extra loaf or loaves allowed by a baker in each dozen; creating a "baker's-dozen".

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - One who holds the "doctrine of signatures" . . . by which it was formerly supposed a plant's nature or medicinal use was pointed out.

    --Joseph Worcester's Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To wash. It was anciently 13th century the custom for guests to wash before sitting down to meals, and it seems that the signal for this ablution was given by sounding a trumpet.

    --William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

    January 19, 2018

  • Tripudist, one given to "tripudiating."

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1919

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A rural wedding to which all are invited but expected to bring contributions, the smallest, that of a child, being a penny.

    --Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - The term circumlocution office carries with it the same idea as "red tape." It was originated by Dickens in Little Dorrit as a skit on the dilatoriness of government offices in transacting business. It was an office where business was habitually muddled up and delayed by high-salaried officials who shirked duties by passing them on to other departments, who in turn passed them elsewhere.

    --J.B. Lippincott's Everyday Phrases Explained, 1913

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To quarrel; argisome, quarrelsome.

    --Thomas Sternberg's Dialect and Folk-Lore of Northamptonshire, 1851

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - Corpulence; formed on Latin ventrem, belly.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) An obsolete variant of cludder, a crowd, heap, cluster. Clouder is probably the same word as clutter, and is evidently the proper term for "a lot of cats."

    --C.E. Hare's Language of Field and Sport, 1939

    (2) Cludder, cluther, a large quantity, or mass of anything, gathered together.

    --John Atkinson's Cleveland Yorkshire Glossary, 1868

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Cross, irritable.

    --Thomas Sternberg's Dialect and Folk-Lore of Northamptonshire, 1851

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) The act of putting to death every twentieth man. Related to decimate.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Rarely shown or exhibited; from Saxon seld; Shakespeare.

    --Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A sand-grinder.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    (2) This occupation was formerly much more common in Lancashire than now, sand being more frequently used, not only for the purpose of cleaning but as a kind of ornament, and to preserve cleanliness. After a floor had been washed, to "sand" it by scrubbing with loose sand was almost the universal custom.

    --J.H. Nodal's Glossary of the Lancashire Dialect, 1882

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - It was the custom for persons much employed in writing to carry ink, pens, &c. in a horn. Hence inkhorn terms, studied expressions that savour of the inkhorn. A very favorite expression, for a time.

    --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - People, after they have been fou, feel as they are returning to their wits again, a buzzing and singin' in the head, which are called bees o' the brain. Also, when they are getting intoxicated they feel these fanciful insects.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - Sour beer . . . formed by acetous fermentation; from French aigre, sour.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - To dress grossly or inelegantly. Sometimes written mable, perhaps by a ludicrous allusion to the French je m'habille I get dressed.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    January 19, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) To laugh idiotically; hence, goffeny, a fool, silly person. Yorkshire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    (2) Goister, to laugh loudly.

    --Jabez Good's Glossary of East Lincolnshire, 1900

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - Merry, sportive. "How crauky the boy is!"

    --Rev. R.E.G. Cole's Glossary of Southwest Lincolnshire, 1886

    January 19, 2018

  • Possessing or characterized by rokes . . . smoke, steam, vapour, mist, fog, drizzling rain.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1914

    January 19, 2018

  • Trollmydames \Troll"my*dames`\, n. F. trou-madame pigeon holes. The game of nineholes. Written also trolmydames. Obs.

    --Shak.

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A call for a truce by one who has fallen in play; improperly for "fall, tumble."

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 19, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Used of a cow who, when she lifts her back is said to "hump her gruffins."

    --Thomas Darlington's Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A thick pottage made of whole wheat hulled, steeped, and boiled in milk.

    --Thomas Dyche's New General English Dictionary, 1740

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Talk, muttering. Of Teutonic mummelen; old word.

    --Nathaniel Bailey's Etymological English Dictionary, 1749

    (2) Explained as "muttering talk." Error for moublienies, in "ne moubliemies," forget-me-nots, about 1500. Momble, mumble.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, List of Spurious Words, 1933

    (3) "Ne momblysnesse and souenesse," no mumbling talk nor noisy sound.

    --Charles Richardson's New Dictionary of the English Language, 1836-1837

    The passage, "Ne momblysnesse and souenesse," found in a 1532 edition of Chaucer's works, was perhaps the origin of the long-lived confusion about this faux word. As late as 1889, William Whitney carelessly included momblishness in his Century Dictionary as the same "muttering talk" of his predecessors, citing an early 1731 edition of Bailey's dictionary as the source.

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - A hasty tidying of the house between the time you see a neighbor and the time she knocks on the door.

    --John Gould's Maine Lingo: Boiled Owls, Billdads, and Wazzats, 1975

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - Cold weather which makes men hunch up their shoulders, and animals contract their limbs and look as if they were hunch-backed.

    --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    January 19, 2018

  • (adjective) - (1) As cold as a key, on account of the coldness of the metal of which it is composed; a key was anciently employed to stop any slight bleeding. The epithet is common to many old writers.

    --Rev. Alexander Dyce's Glossary to the Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    (2) Lifeless.

    --Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - He that wil sweare & maintain oathes. This is such a lying knave that none wil beleve him, for the more he sweareth, ye les is to be beleved.

    --John Awdeley's Fraternitye of Vagabondes, 1565

    January 19, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Sweating places, or baths.

    --Joseph Worcester's Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

    January 19, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Term for difficult or cramped writing.

    --Robert Mayne's Expository Lexicon of the Terms . . . of Medicine and General Science, 1853-1860

    (2) Writer's cramp now graphospasm; also in anglicized form, mogigraphy; hence, mogigraphic. From Greek mogi, with toil and pain, used in a few modern Latin pathological terms, as mogilalia, mogilalism, stammering, and mogiphonia, "a difficulty in producing loud vocal sounds with the larynx, ordinary speech remaining," from the Sydenham Society Lexicon.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

    January 19, 2018

  • This makes me feel somewhat more charitable toward the garter toss thing, for some reason.

    January 18, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) To pull about, especially applied to any rough dalliance with a female.

    --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    (2) Touzly, ruffled, shaggy. In the phrase, "to touzle one's top," to make one's hair stand on end.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 18, 2018

  • once ran from this day, the Feast of Epiphany, through Ash Wednesday, when marriages commonly took place in Britain. They were frowned on during Lent, especially on March 19, and were all but forbidden during the Christmas season, from late November until Epiphany. June nuptials remained in vogue and were blessed by the Church, but those during the "lusty month of May" were condemned as a holdover from pagan times, as this couplet reminds us:

    Married in May, and kirked dressed in green,

    Both bride and groom won't long be seen.

    John Brand's Observations on Popular Antiquities (1813) noted: "There was formerly a custom in the North of England, which will be thought to have bordered very closely upon indecency, and strongly marks the grossness of manners that prevailed among our ancestors. It was for the young men . . . to strive immediately after the ceremony to see who could first pluck off the Bride's Garters from her legs. This was done before the very altar . . . Whoever were so fortunate as to be victors in this . . . contest, during which the bride was often obliged to scream out, and was very frequently thrown down, bore the garters about the church in triumph."

    January 18, 2018

  • (adjective) - Said of women who after their marriage . . . become . . . miserable-looking.

    --Georgina Jackson's Shropshire Word-Book, 1879

    January 18, 2018

  • https://beyond-mogai-pride-flags.tumblr.com/post/169210869700/recugender-pride-flag

    Recugender: to identify with your birth gender, but you refuse to be cis; to be used as recugirl or recuboy. From the latin word “recuso”, meaning “to refuse”.

    January 18, 2018

  • amparsy.

    January 18, 2018

  • The symbol &, which rhymes with V for usage at the end of the alphabet.

    "...L M N O P

    Q R S and T U V

    W (you may have to pronounce it "dub") X Y Z amparsy..."

    See ampersand.

    January 18, 2018

  • see anparsy.

    January 18, 2018

  • It starts as a commonplace meme,

    Repeated, becomes a grand theme.

    Its freshness once past

    It settles at last

    Retired as a philosopheme.

    January 18, 2018

  • He is speaking so often now, and what he says is so closely scrutinized by supporters and detractors alike, that he fears one inartfully phrased remark could be used to pull him down from his new perch.

    January 18, 2018

  • At the same time, health problems that have long plagued him, including bouts of debilitating fatigue, have resurfaced.

    January 18, 2018

  • It would be hard to ferret out anything to protest in these pages.

    transitive v. To uncover and bring to light by searching. Often used with out: "Their work merely points the way for others to ferret out the core components of all proteins” ( Natalie Angier).

    January 18, 2018

  • On the table in his den is a copy of his new book, 12 Rules for Life.

    January 18, 2018

  • Pepe is a smirking cartoon frog that was originally conceived as an innocent illustration but has been appropriated as a tongue-in-cheek icon by aggressively pro-Trump types.

    January 18, 2018

  • His frenetic, freewheeling approach is the antithesis of a rehearsed TED talk.

    January 18, 2018

  • His audience likes the no-frills urgency, the sense that he’s digging to the heart of impossibly complex conundrums, the feeling that they’re observing a bona fide philosopher sweat out the truth under pressure.

    sweat out Slang To endure anxiously: sweat out an exam.

    sweat out Slang To await (something) anxiously: sweat out one's final grades.

    January 18, 2018

  • He’s lost the beard he sported in years past, along with a lot of weight — 50 pounds, he says, since he changed his diet and stopped taking antidepressants.

    transitive v. To display or show off: "His shoes sported elevated heels” ( Truman Capote).

    January 18, 2018

  • In the early 2000s, Peterson began buying these paintings on eBay because the irony of bidding for communist agitprop on the most capitalist marketplace ever devised was too delicious to resist. But he also bought them to remind himself of how glorious utopian visions often descend into unspeakable horror.

    January 18, 2018

  • Peterson was quick to shut down students who used "facile ideological arguments" from either end of the political spectrum. "He would dispatch them readily and was unafraid to do so," Hurwitz says.

    January 18, 2018

  • Hurwitz thinks Peterson’s knack for extracting life lessons from lofty concepts helps account for his appeal.

    January 18, 2018

  • Hurwitz thinks Peterson’s knack for extracting life lessons from lofty concepts helps account for his appeal.

    January 18, 2018

  • aad, a professor of marketing at Concordia University, has likewise sparked the ire of some on the left with his critiques of feminism and Islam.

    January 18, 2018

  • He believes that the humanities and the social sciences in particular have become corrupted — a term he employs with relish — by left-wing ideology, and that they are failing to adequately educate students.

    January 18, 2018

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