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  • something that has flaws but still is awesome .

    June 29, 2017

  • Exactly--with his aviator glasses and bomber jacket (which he'd have picked up last winter in the "seasonal" section).

    June 28, 2017

  • ruzuzu Thanks! I think Ace Bandage is a solid addition. I imagine he would be the grizzled leader constantly grumbling and shaking his head at the antics of the others.

    June 28, 2017

  • Okay

    June 28, 2017

  • Stellar list!

    June 28, 2017

  • The scheme of the vegan is gentle

    With quinoa and kale and the lentil.

    Are benefits real

    As followers feel,

    Or is its appeal nutrimental?

    June 28, 2017

  • Fantastic!

    June 27, 2017

  • Or paradelle?

    June 27, 2017

  • Nice one, qms.

    Also, I'm adding this to my hence list.

    June 27, 2017

  • Oh, fun!

    June 27, 2017

  • Alright!

    June 27, 2017

  • Compare zibet.

    June 27, 2017

  • The Word of the Day limerick for July 27, 2017 is meant to be read in the context of the comment posted at logothete on September 4, 2014.

    June 27, 2017

  • The warhorse was no longer fleet

    So had to be shrewd and discreet.

    Where stronger words failed

    Old Teddy assailed

    His foe with the slur, logothete.

    June 27, 2017

  • forever

    June 27, 2017

  • more than 4ever

    June 27, 2017

  • definition spotted on twitter "cute ugly"

    looking at March - June tweets, it seems to be used in a friendly way.

    June 27, 2017

  • sounds like a car port

    (1950's book search agrees to an extent, but also argues a difference)

    June 27, 2017

  • See porte cochère.

    June 27, 2017

  • Merriam Webster: a covered entryway into a courtyard.

    June 27, 2017

  • Yes it was. Sounds similar to a storm surge

    June 27, 2017

  • I saw something about that, too--was it about one of the Great Lakes?

    June 26, 2017

  • Stockline seems to refer to a list of livestock held by its owner, relating especially to their genealogy and blood lines.

    June 26, 2017

  • https://www.eater.com/2017/6/26/15858180/raw-cookie-dough-trend

    When pitching their idea, Schmid and Pacetti claimed their product was the only edible cookie dough on the market made to be eaten as-is. Not anymore: Between new shops, expansions, and menu upgrades, 2017 is set to be the breakout year for edible cookie dough. Dō — based in New York City, where there is a line for everything — certainly garnered a lot of publicity during its January opening, but it wasn’t the only doughy debut of the year. In February, Tart Sweets bakery in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, started selling its dough in “doughwiches” and by the scoop through its cookie dough bar, which is only open Fridays and Saturdays. Earlier this year, Yoyo Berri frozen yogurt shops in Nebraska and South Dakota started offering raw cookie dough to liven up yesterday’s snack craze. And four flavors of the stuff, served with a side of “ice milk,” will be among the newest items featured at this year’s Minnesota State Fair.

    June 26, 2017

  • "Vegan psychologist Melanie Joy would describe me as a “carnist”. It’s a neologism that means I’m conditioned to accept meat-eating is natural and that animals are categorised into edible, inedible, pets and predators, rather than equals." The Guardian

    June 26, 2017

  • At Daisy Mae's regular onfall

    The hollow resounds to her bonk call:

    "Come old men and young

    The wee and well-hung

    It don't matter none. I want y'all!"

    June 26, 2017

  • abbreviation for Starbucks

    June 26, 2017

  • early sighting of this term 1997 or 1998 in a software sense

    Department of Veteran's Affairs.

    "- Education System Replatform/Redesign

    - to replatform or redesign all Education benefit delivery systems to operate on the VBA Stage 1 environment"

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=wG0eAAAAMAAJ&q=replatform&dq=replatform

    1994 example by the IEEE

    "Determine how COBOL/SRE might help to re-platform our code and subsequently support new development within APG "


    previous non-tech sense of this word is related to trains and train platforms.

    June 26, 2017

  • I've heard this pronounced as Engine X

    For non-techies, it's a web page server thingy.

    June 26, 2017

  • website speak - from the examples "Linux, Nginx, MySQL, PHP5"

    similar to LAMP

    June 26, 2017

  • marketing, or 'marketing and communications'

    June 26, 2017

  • in software developerspeak "(MongoDB, Express, Angular, node.js)"

    June 26, 2017

  • random stranger

    June 26, 2017

  • abbreviation of marketing

    June 26, 2017

  • a software industry buzzword bingo jargon word.

    it's a term that implies that all these technical things work together nicely and flawlessly, but the reality is that a tech stack is a cross between square pegs hammered into round holes, a Rube Goldberg machine and a Jenga tower which stops working and falls apart at the slightest disturbance.

    Also, powered by hamsters. x1636

    June 26, 2017

  • All night fans in frenzy gave tongue -

    Gargantuan efforts of lung!

    Despite boastful songs

    The team failed its throngs,

    Who slouched sadly homeward, head-hung.

    June 25, 2017

  • spotted in news as a weather generated tsunami

    June 25, 2017

  • an air filter for marijuana smokers to exhale without stinking up the place.

    June 25, 2017

  • DICHTUNG means "Poetry" in German.

    June 24, 2017

  • Some think that the Donald's an odd man,

    But others, a sweet-natured Lord's man.

    I must give the nod

    To the party of odd;

    His piety reeks of the fraudsman.

    June 24, 2017

  • I think it refers to when something is 'brought into existence,' which makes sense when you say "He fathers-forth all things that shine."

    June 24, 2017

  • I don't know why. The 19th c. Had whiskey as part of frostbite treatment.  (google book search "whisky frostbite" 19th c.)

    June 23, 2017

  • See citation on pyrosome.

    June 23, 2017

  • "Each pyrosome is made up of individual zooids – small, multicellular organisms – linked together in a tunic to form a tube-like colony that is closed on one end. They are filter feeders and use cilia to draw plankton into their mucous filter."

    -- "Researchers probe explosion of pyrosomes off the Northwest Coast" (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/features/pyrosomes/index.cfm)

    June 23, 2017

  • I haven't had enough coffee for a limerick, so I'll default to haiku:

    qms plants seeds

    and encourages us to

    cultivate our own.

    June 23, 2017

  • While "nut job" and "loon" are dismissive

    Yet "mad" and "insane" echo fictive.

    The language amazes

    With terms for our crazes;

    It's supple and locodescriptive.

    June 23, 2017

  • ruzuzu and bilby combine

    Lamenting my poor withered vine,

    But if there's an ointment

    For cruel disappointment

    That comforting unction is mine.

    For limericks are careless of clime

    And ripen regardless of time.

    Their happiest chore

    Is spreading of spore

    To generate offspring in rhyme.

    June 23, 2017

  • emoji poetry

    most emoji poetry is non english

    June 23, 2017

  • Why a cocktail? Wouldn't jam make more sense?

    June 22, 2017

  • Chimps and fruit bats are picky.

    When it comes to their lunch, it's sticky.

    Why eat cheese or meat?

    Choose fruits or a beet.

    (But maybe not a durian--they're icky.)

    June 22, 2017

  • I was thinking something more like the university from Rocky and Bullwinkle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSVq7X7OPeQ

    June 22, 2017

  • Maghrirat is nothing but to get forgiven from the GOD i.e.ALLLAH

    June 22, 2017

  • kjdnq

    June 22, 2017

  • But what about fruit, mister qms?

    From bananas and grapes you digress

    I'll pop me a melon

    When breakfast desire is swellin'

    And laugh like a pineapple, more or less

    June 22, 2017

  • Rubbish, there must be something like 60 billion toes on the planet.

    June 22, 2017

  • The pattern is hard to ignore:

    Buy local and you are a locavore;

    If seeking cheap eats

    In veggies and meats

    You're frugal and known as a frugivore.

    June 22, 2017

  • This refers to the sourtoe drink which has a mummified toe.

    Fron the Guardian article:

    "For more than 40 years the Downtown hotel in Dawson City has served up the sourtoe cocktail, a shot of whisky with a blackened toe – nail and all – bobbing inside. Those who manage to touch the gnarled, severed toe to their lips earn a certificate.

    On Saturday a customer took it one step further, allegedly making off with the wrinkled digit after swallowing his drink. “We are furious,” said Terry Lee of the hotel. “Toes are very hard to come by.”"

    June 22, 2017

  • Ruzuzu, you need to meet Joe Dolce: https://youtu.be/9jwPqDVtsTU

    June 22, 2017

  • Wikipedia says kyphobic refers to a curvature of the spine past 45 degrees. The medical condition is called kyphosis.

    June 22, 2017

  • physics - "Other physicists figured out that this quantum state represented spin.

    And the up and down degrees of freedom with direction of pointing along the angular momentum axis. We now call these component waveforms spinors"

    June 22, 2017

  • https://twitter.com/Delafina777/status/877637588529561600

    (And that's for cis women--for society that has trouble remembering trans women, enbys, etc. exist, the HORROR that they would take the mic)

    June 21, 2017

  • Arrived here after getting liftman as a random word. What a nice list!

    June 21, 2017

  • Spotted as "no f'ing idea"

    Has nfi, had nfi. Or nfi as an adjective.

    June 21, 2017

  • What's a matta?

    June 21, 2017

  • Your lists are lovely.

    June 21, 2017

  • In Australia a half-job Harry.

    June 21, 2017

  • Expressions of disapprobation

    Have many a nasty mutation:

    The cold look that lingers,

    The wagging of fingers,

    But worst is the endless jobation.

    June 21, 2017

  • most of the examples point to the boat being called a gilnetter.

    June 21, 2017

  • LBD twitterspeak for 'little black dress'.

    June 21, 2017

  • See also ifrit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ifrit

    June 20, 2017

  • Also shankjob via Urban Dictionary: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=shankjob

    "A shankjob is someone who can't do anything correctly and/or does really shoddy work."

    June 20, 2017

  • Wiktionary: "One who fishes using a gillnet."

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gillnetter

    June 20, 2017

  • Wikipedia suggests egule is of Manchurian origin and refers to a cloud of suspended water droplets.

    June 20, 2017

  • ""|Hélène| Grimaud doesn't sound like most pianists: she is a rubato artist, a reinventor of phrasings, a taker of chances. "A wrong note that is played out of élan, you hear it differently than one that is played out of fear," she says.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=H%C3%A9l%C3%A8ne_Grimaud&oldid=778559561

    June 20, 2017

  • A poet who's really astute

    Is neither obscure nor too cute.

    His work ought to dart

    Straight to the heart

    Not needing a shrewd hermeneut.

    June 20, 2017

  • See goodman.

    June 20, 2017

  • Nov 1st.

    June 20, 2017

  • spotted in 1787 as a Mr Thingamy

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=leo5AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA457&dq=Thingamy

    spotted again in 1851 as Mr. Thingamy along with Mr. So-and-so and Mr. Thing'embob

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=-MVNAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA305&dq="what%27s+his+name";

    and again in 1870 as Mr. What's-his-name Thingamy

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=sdFZAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA104&dq="what%27s+his+name";

    June 20, 2017

  • thanks.

    new words discovered are ihy, aftselakhis ,Meteorological Summer,

    burlesquercise , Malama Honua , cishet , ponv , resilient Thessaloniki , covfefe

    June 20, 2017

  • A Goodman is an old word meaning "owner of a house," or there about.

    June 20, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • Rhythm and meter are the engine driving virtually all music, and it is likely that they were the very first elements used by our ancestors to make protomusics, a tradition we still hear today in tribal drumming, and in the rituals of various preindustrial cultures. While I believe timbre is now at the center of our approciation of music, rhythm has held supreme power over listeners for much longer..
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 55

    June 19, 2017

  • The organ player typically has control over which of these supplementary pipes he wants to blow air through by pulling and pushing levers, or drawbars, that direct the flow of air. Knowing that clarinets have a lot of energy in the odd harmonics of the overtone series, a clever organ player could simulate the sound of a clarinet by manipulating drawbars in such a way as to recreate the overtone series of that instrument.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 48

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • When you hear a saxophone playing a tone with a fundamental frequency of 220 Hz, you are actually hearing many tones, not just one. The other tones you hear are integer multiples of the fundamental: 440, 660, . . . . These different tones—the overtones—have different intensities, and so we hear them as having different loudnesses for these tones is distinctive of the saxophone, and they are what give rise to its unique tonal color, its unique sound—its timbre. . . . Indeed, for each instrument, there exists a unique pattern of overtones. . . . Virtually all of the tonal variation we hear—the quality that gives a trumpet its trumpetiness and that gives a piano its pianoness—comes from the unique way in which the loudnesses of the overtones are distributed.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 46

    June 19, 2017

  • If a musician is playing the white keys, how do I know if he is playing the A minor scale or the C major scale? The answer is that—entirely without our conscious awareness—our brains are keeping track of how many times particular notes are sounded, where they appear in terms of strong versus weak beats, and how long they last. A computational process in the brain makes an inference about the key we're in based on these properties. This is another example of something that most of us can do even without musical training, and what psychologist call declarative knowledge—the ability to talk about it . . . .
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 38

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The basilar membrane of the inner ear contains hair cells that are frequency selective, firing only in response to a certain band of frequencies. These are stretched out across the membrane from low frequencies to high; low-frequency sounds excite hair cells on one end of the basilar membrane, medium frequency sounds excite the hair cells in the middle, and high-frequency sounds excite them at the other end. . . . Because the different tones are spread out across the surface topography of the membrane, this is called a tonotopic map.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 28

    June 19, 2017

  • The notion of relative pitch values is seen readily in the way that we speak. When you ask someone a question, your voice naturally rises in intonation at the end of the sentence, signaling that you are asking. . . . This is a convention in English (thought not in all languages—we have to learn it), and is known in linguistics as a prosodic cue.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 27

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • Sound waves impinge on the eardrums and pinnae (the fleshy parts of your ear), setting off a chain of mechanical and neurochemical events, the end product of which is an internal mental image we call pitch.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 24

    Sing. pinna

    June 19, 2017

  • The official definition of the Acoustical Society of America is that timbre is everything about a sound that is not loudness or pitch. So much for scientific precision!
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 19

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • Psychophysicists—scientists who study the ways that the brain interacts with the physical world—have shown that these attributes are separable. Each can be varied without altering the others, allowing the scientific study of one at a time.
    Daniel J. Levitin, This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession (New York: Penguin Random House, 2007), p. 17

    June 19, 2017

  • What are words worth

    June 19, 2017

  • I've added it to my list.

    June 19, 2017

  • I'm fairly sure aftselakhis are things ruzuzu puts on an overhead projector in order to make interesting shapes, colours and patterns.

    June 19, 2017

  • This is great!

    June 19, 2017

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