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  • (noun) - A bleak, cold place. A place where the frost wind finds easy admittance. Also a person with a saucy air - as much thinking that he does not care a damn for the world . . . He passes the poor with a sneer, and capsizes the infirm with a laugh - his bosom is a bleak place, a bensle - cold unfeeling blasts whistle round his frozen heart.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Or stirrup-dram also stirrup-glass, a glass of ardent spirits, or draught of ale, given by the landlord of an inn to his guest when about to depart on horseback.

    --John Jamieson's Supplement to the Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1825

    (2) Tib Mumps will be out wi' the stirrup-dram in a gliffing.

    --Sir Walter Scott's Guy Mannering, 1815

    (3) In the north of the Highlands called "cup at the door."

    --Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

    January 17, 2018

  • One who writes or discourses on heroes. From heroology, also herology, a history of, or treatise on, heroes. Heroological, pertaining to the history of heroes; heroogony, generation of heroes.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) If the stay of the guest exceeds a week, it should be called "a visitation." If it includes a dining, or a tea-drinking, or evening-spending, it may be termed "a visit," while a mere call can be mentioned as "a vis."

    --Eliza Leslie's Behaviour Book, 1859

    (2) If you cannot make me a visit, at least make me a vis, if you can.

    --Charles Southey's Life of the Rev. Andrew Bell, 1844

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A lawyer whose record would not be regarded in a desirable light; this term is equivalent to black-leg.

    --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    (2) An incompetent or unskilled or unprincipled person; frequently used of lawyers and preachers.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A feminine masterpiece; after masterpiece. Compare French maîtresse pièce, the principle piece of a work; 1640s to early 1900s.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

    (2) Rosamund . . . being the mistress-piece of beauty in that Age.

    --Thomas Fuller's History of the Worthies of England, 1662

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Pedantic expressions which "smell of the lamp."

    --Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

    January 17, 2018

  • (adverb/adjective) - To go woolward was to wear woollen next to the skin as a penance. "Wolward and wetshod went I forth" William Langland's Piers Plowman, c.1399.

    --William Toone's Glossary and Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) This punishment, which is called running the gantlet, is seldom inflicted except for crimes as will excite a general antipathy amongst the seamen, as on some occasions the culprit would pass without receiving a single blow, particularly in cases of mutiny or sedition.

    --William Falconer's Universal Dictionary of the Marine, 1771

    (2) From Ghent and Dutch loopen, to run, because the punishment was first inflicted in that place.

    --Joseph Worcester's Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - Thirsty. The puckfyst is a dried toadstool. Hence, "A feels puckfyst" means I feel as dry as a dried toadstool.

    --Appleton Morgan's Study in the Warwickshire Dialect, 1900

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Toothache and neuralgia. From Dutch zinkings, rheumatism.

    --Charles Pettman's Africanderisms: A Glossary of South African Colloquial Words and Phrases, 1913

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A very short space of time.

    --Jon Bee's Slang: A Dictionary, 1823

    (2) Synonymous with "cockstride," cock's tread.

    --John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    (3) You'll find yourself in bed in something less than a pig's whisper.

    --Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers, 1837

    January 17, 2018

  • Another word to add to the swear jar.

    I like this one. It's a fun insult.

    January 17, 2018

  • a euph. for god-damned adj.; thus gorm v, to damn.

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) An expletive denoting surprise. "Bezonter me! but aw'm fair gormed."

    --Robert Holland's Glossary of Words Used in . . . Cheshire, 1886

    (2) Also written bezounter and bezountee.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb/noun) - (1) To confuse. Halliwell says moppil is a mistake or blunder.

    --Rev. Alfred Easther's Glossary of the Dialect of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

    (2) A state of disorder.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    (3) Of an overgrown hedge, "In such a mopple."

    --Francis Havergal's Herefordshire Words and Phrases, 1887

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Mutton of a maiden sheep; Gloucestershire.

    --Samuel Pegge's Supplement to Grose's Provincial Glossary, 1814

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - Cracked. Eggs which have been set upon are said to have become spretched a day or two before the liberation of the chicken is effected. Lincolnshire.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 17, 2018

  • (adverb) - A proverbial expression in America signifying "to the utmost." The allusion is to a vehicle sunk in the mud to the hub, which is as far as it can go.

    --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    January 17, 2018

  • The Arabs press curds and butter together to store in vats, and the Scots have Crowdie or Cruddy Butter.

    January 17, 2018

  • are deceptive glimpses of sunlight between dark clouds. The word itself is derived from OE 'deofol', and ultimately, via the Latin 'diabolus', from the Greek 'diabolos', which originally meant an accuser or slanderer, from the corresponding verb meaning literally to throw across.

    January 17, 2018

  • An overcoat put on to cover the defects of one's underclothing.

    January 17, 2018

  • is a genus of livebearing fishes belonging to the Cyprinodontiform family Poeciliidae.

    January 17, 2018

  • chiromantic. : of or relating to chiromancy or chiromancers.

    January 17, 2018

  • Possibly porphyr- L. fr Gr. porphyra, purple fish, murex, purple

    Prefixes meaning purple, dark red. & ferous

    -ferous; suffix: -iferous having, bearing, or containing (a specified thing).

    January 17, 2018

  • An old Cornish word for pipedreams, or ridiculous thoughts or ideas.

    January 17, 2018

  • In the 1880s, the alliterative shilling shocker — also called a shilling dreadful — began to appear for a type of more substantial short sensational novel, often by writers of some ability (Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was placed in this category when it first came out).

    January 17, 2018

  • (Lincolnshire) a horse that is apt to be shy

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - Delightful, amusing. From French chatouiller, to tickle, to provoke with delight.

    --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A piece of bread eaten immediately after bathing.

    --Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1911

    (2) From chitter, to shiver; to tremble. Hence, boys are wont to call that bit of bread which they preserve for eating after bathing a chittering-piece.

    --John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A concluding piece or movement played at the end of an oratorio or the like; formed on post, and ludus, play, on analogy of prelude, interlude.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1909

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Patch was at one time a term of contempt. It did not . . . necessarily mean a fool, but signified what we now mean by a contemptible fellow. Shakespeare has A Midsummer Night's Dream: "A crew of patches, base mechanicals." Crosspatch is the only remnant of the word. It is very expressive of a cross, ill-tempered, disagreeable person.

    --Eliezer Edwards' Dictionary of Words, Facts, and Phrases, 1882

    January 17, 2018

  • A wonderfully prosperous season, when even the bad farmer has good crops

    January 17, 2018

  • Alternative form of slughorn. (obsolete) A battle cry.

    January 17, 2018

  • s. Grating in the hearth, through which the ashes fall, leaving the cinders.

    January 17, 2018

  • That children dying unbaptized (called Tarans) wandered in woods and solitudes, lamenting their hard fate, and were often seen. It cannot be doubted, that many of these stories concerning apparitions, tarans, &c., came out of the cloisters of Monks and Friars, or were the invention of designing Priests, who deluded the world with their stories of Purgatory and Limbics Infantum. - The History of the Province of Moray: Comprising the Counties of Elgin and Nairn, the Greater Part of the County of Inverness and a Portion of the County of Banff,--all Called the Province of Moray Before There was a Division Into Counties, Volume 3

    January 17, 2018

  • adj. A term applied to clouds which mix together in thick and gloomy succession

    January 17, 2018

  • ...The mysterious lady Frau Bertha is ever attended by troops of unbaptized children, and she takes them with her when the joins the wild huntsman, and sweeps with him and his wild pack across the wintry sky. In North Devon the local name is "Yeth hounds". heath and heathen being both "Yeth" in the North Devon dialect (...) and the belief seems to be that their unbaptized children's spirits, having no admittance into Paradise, unite in a pack of "Heathen" or "Yeth" hounds, and hunt the Evil One to home they ascribe their unhappy condition. These Yeth Hounds or Wisht Hounds were well known in west country folk lore. - The Blessed and the Damned: Sinful Women and Unbaptised Children in Irish Folklore by Anne O'Connor

    January 17, 2018

  • To get drunk.

    January 17, 2018

  • (n) a strange sight fit only to be stared at

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A wanton wench that is ready to ride upon the men's backs, or else passively to be their rompstall. The word mutton, when applied to a woman, whether alone or as part of a compound epithet, seems always to have been opprobrious, as in Shakespeare's Two Gentlemen of Verona: "Ay, sir; I, a lost mutton, gave your letter to her, a laced mutton; and she, a laced mutton, gave me, a lost mutton, nothing for my labour." From rig, rigging, ready to bestride any inactive stallion, and give him a quickening spur.

    --Frederick Elworthy's Specimens of English Dialects: Devonshire, 1879

    (2) Rigmutton rumpstall, a wanton girl. West Country.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A leader, a great man.

    --J.H. Nodal's Glossary of the Lancashire Dialect, 1882

    (2) One possessing more knowledge than the common people. Lancashire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 17, 2018

  • I like all these words you're listing Gammerstang.

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - (1) In the phrase to take eggs for money, to accept an offer which one would rather refuse . . . Farmers' daughters would go to market, taking with them a basket of eggs. If one bought something worth . . . three shillings, fourpence, she would pay the three shillings and say - "will you take eggs for the rest of the money?" If the shopman weakly consented, he received the value of the fourpence in eggs, usually . . . at the rate of four or five a penny. But the strong-minded shopman would refuse. Eggs were even used to pay interest for money.

    --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    (2) A proverbial expression, when a person was either awed by threats or overreached by subtlety, to give money upon a trifling or fictitious consideration.

    --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    (3) Mine honest friend, will you take eggs for money?

    --William Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, 1611

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A discourse on bells or bell-ringing; from Italian campana, bell.

    --James Donald's Chambers' Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, 1877

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A lock or key to a door or gate, a padlock.

    --J. Robertson's Glossary of Dialect and Archaic Words Used in . . . Gloucester, 1890

    January 17, 2018

  • fanciful, kooky, entertainer.

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - (1) That may be rendered into English.

    --John Ogilvie's Imperial Dictionary, 1865

    (2) Capable of being translated into, or expressed in, English.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - If you ask a Scotchman the distance to any place he will reply, after asking you in return where you came from, that it is so many miles and a bittock.

    --James Maitland's American Slang Dictionary, 1891

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A blasphemer; from French blasphémateur. Blasphemeress, a woman who blasphemes; from Old French blasphemeresse. Blasphement, blasphemy.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A garden or orchard.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - The unpleasant aftereffects of overindulgence, especially drinking.

    --Lester Berrey's American Thesaurus of Slang, 1942

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - Unlucky . . . Perhaps corrupted from hazard.

    --William Holloway's Dictionary of Provincialisms, 1838

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Equivalent to the breeches of a Highlander, or the dress of a naked Pict; upon the presumption that Welchmen wear no hose.

    --Thomas Fielding's Select Proverbs of All Nations, 1824

    (2) In phrases like "to make a Welshman's hose of" and "to make like a Welshman's hose," to stretch or wrest the meaning of a word, sentence, etc.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A chamber utensil enclosed in a stool or box.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A metaphor for a pleasant experience, perhaps because a supply of chips gives promise of a good fire.

    --Richard Thornton's American Glossary, 1912

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Widowhood; from Latin viduus.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Murmuring in an undertone; Shropshire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 17, 2018

  • From debacchate, to revile one after the manner of drunkards.

    Henry Cockeram's Interpreter of Hard English Words, 1623

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A young thief; from grinche, a thief . . . Other varieties of the tribe of thieving malefactors go by the appellations of chevalier de la grippe, limousineur, voleur de bonjour, droguiste, &c. The English brethren are denominated: prig, cracksman, crossman, sneaksman, moucher, hooker, flash cove, bug-hunter, cross-cove, buz-faker, stook-hauler, toy-getter, prop-nailer, area-sneak, lob-sneak, lully-prigger, thimble-twister, conveyancer, pudding-snammer, beak-hunter, ziff, buttock-and-file, poll-thief, little snakesman, mill-ben, cove on the cross, flashman and, formerly a good fellow, a bridle-cull.

    --Albert Barrère's Dictionary of Slang, Jargon, and Cant, 1889

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - True, straightforward, correct.

    --Edward Fraser's Soldier and Sailor Words and Phrases, 1925

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A quick motion, between running and walking when one, on account of fear or weakness, is not able to run at full speed. The term seems to have had its origin from the flight of those who, living in a country subject to many inroads and depredations, were often obliged to escape from their enemies, while in consequence of hot pursuit their lives were in jeopardy every moment.

    --John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - A practical joke was to secure someone's door from the outside with long coffin-screws. The victim was said to be screwed in or screwed up. Hence, screwed up came to mean defeated, baffled, incapable of retaliation. Oxford.

    --Morris Marples' University Slang, 1950

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A drummer. A form corrupted from drumslager . . . Dutch trommelslager.

    --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Light rubbish wood; a perquisite to hedgers. Norfolk and Suffolk.

    --Samuel Pegge's Supplemental Glossary, c.1800

    (2) Refuse, esp. for burning; light refuse wood, cinders, etc. used for fuel.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    (3) Shruffe, the undergrowth of the swamps; shruffey meadowe, shruffey upland. Dedham Records, 1659-1660.

    --George Krapp's English Language in America, 1925

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A weather prophet.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    (2) By the colour or hue of the scaum atmospheric haze do watherwiseakers guess about coming weather.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    (3) From wiseacre, a wise or learned person; a sage.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb) - To change, transform.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Kid leather. Hence, a very flexible conscience was called a chevril conscience. From French cheveril, goat.

    --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb) - A prisoner is said to stand mute when, being arraigned for treason or felony, he either makes no answer, or answers foreign to the purpose. Anciently, a mute was taken back to prison, placed in a dark dungeon, naked, on his back, on the bare ground, and a great weight of iron placed on his body . . . By statute 12 George III, judgment is awarded against mutes, in the same manner as if they were convicted or confessed. A man refusing to plead was condemned and executed . . . on a charge of burglary, at Wells, 1792.

    --Joseph Haydn's Dictionary of Dates, 1841

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A travelling hawker, who sells by Dutch auction, i.e., reduces the price of his wares until he finds a purchaser. From Anglo-Saxon chepe, a market. Sometimes cheap-John.

    --Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

    (2) Cheap-jackery, that which is characteristic of a cheap-jack.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A passion, a rage. In a panshard, in a rage, out of temper. Pansheet, a state of excitement, confusion, sudden passion. Panshite in West Yorkshire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    (2) You have no need to get into a panshard.

    --John Wise's New Forest: Its History and Its Scenery, 1883

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A scrivener, a clerk; satirical phrase similar to "steel bar driver," a tailor.

    --John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    (2) A clerk, scribe, or hackney writer. Brother of the quill, an author.

    --Francis Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1796

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - Elated with liquor.

    --William Cope's Glossary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb/noun) - A whining beggar is a cadger. "On the cadge" is applied to the regular "rounders" who wander from town to town telling in each place a pitiful story of distress. In Scotland a cadger is an itinerant peddler of fish.

    --James Maitland's American Slang Dictionary, 1891

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - The true expression of a word; the etymology or right meaning of a word.

    --Thomas Blount's Glossographia, 1656

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A skating-rink with ice artificially produced, as in aquarium, vivarium.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - The bitterest grief; extreme affliction. The ancients taught that grief and joy were subject to the gall, affection to the heart, knowledge to the kidneys, anger to the bile one of the four humors of the body, and courage or timidity to the liver. The gall of bitterness, like the heart of hearts, means the bitter centre of bitterness, as the heart of hearts means the innermost recesses of the heart of affections.

    --Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A thick slice of bread on which butter is spread with the thumb.

    --Sidney Addy's Glossary of Words Used in Sheffield, 1888

    January 17, 2018

  • so called by the Saxons because a chief ingredient in their malt-liquor instead of hops.

    --Daniel Fenning's Royal English Dictionary, 1775

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - An ambiguous expression; a quibble; from Latin œquivocus, ambiguous.

    --Joseph Worcester's Comprehensive Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - (1) Of the wind, blowing with cold chilly gusts.

    --G. Story's Dictionary of Newfoundland English, 1982

    (2) Faff, to blow in sudden gusts; Scotland, English North Country. Hence faffment, nonsense, balderdash; Lancashire.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Time or season; the divisions of the 24 hours. From an ancient book in the old German dialect, Speygel der Leyen, or the Mirrour of Laymen, it appears that the 24 hours were divided into prime, tierce, sext, none, vesper, fall of night, and metten (nightly mass). Our ancestors also had certain divisions of the artificial day, as undertide, &c.

    --William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - (1) Old age, spent to a considerable extent resting in a chair.

    --Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

    (2) In thy Reverence, and thy Chaire-dayes, thus to die in Ruffian battel.

    --William Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI, 1593

    (3) Drooping chair, chair fit for old age; 1 Henry VI.

    --C. Herford's Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    January 17, 2018

  • A pourquoi story ("pourquoi" means "why" in French), also known as an origin story, pourquoi tale or an etiological tale, is a fictional narrative that explains why something is the way it is, for example why a snake has no legs, or why a tiger has stripes. Many legends and folk tales are pourquoi stories.

    January 17, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Low, idle, scandalous tales.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 17, 2018

  • (verb) - To tumble lewdly with women in open day.

    --John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A distemper peculiar to sailors in hot climates wherein they imagine the sea to be green fields, and they throw themselves into it if not restrained.

    --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

    (2) A species of furious delirium to which sailors are subject in the torrid zone; a kind of phrenitis, the attack of which comes on suddenly after a broiling day.

    --Robley Dunglison's Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844

    (3) From French calenture, heat; from Latin caleo, to be hot.

    --John Ridpath's Home Reference Library, 1898

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A satisfying meal; adopted from Old French bouffage defined in its original sense by Cotgrave below. "His inwards and flesh remaining could make no bouffage, but a light bit for the grave." Letter of Sir Thomas Browne, 1672.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    (2) Any meat that, eaten greedily, fils the mouth, and makes the cheeks to swell; cheeke-puffing meat.

    --Randle Cotgrave's Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues, 1611

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A chair in which an offender was placed to be hooted at or pelted by the mob; or it might be used for ducking its occupant; from Icelandic kuka, to ease oneself, and kukr, dung.

    --Charles Annandale's Dictionary of the English Language, 1897

    (2) An instrument of punishment formerly in use for scolds, disorderly women, fraudulent tradespeople, etc.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - The participle kilted is sometimes used metaphorically to denote language that borders upon indecency. Derived from kilt, to lift up the petticoats or clothes to avoid wetting them when going on foot. From this verb comes kilt, the English or Saxon name for the most conspicuous portion of the Highlander garb, called by the Highlanders themselves the fillibeg, or little coat.

    --Charles Mackay's Lost Beauties of the English Language, 1874

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A storm consisting of several days of tempestuous weather, believed by the peasantry to take place periodically about the beginning of April, at the time that the gowk, or cuckoo, visits this country. Metaphorically used to denote an evil or obstruction which is only of short duration.

    --John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A man thief; filching-mort, a woman thief.

    --Capt. Alexander Smith's History of the Lives and Robberies of the Most Notorious Highwaymen, Footpads, Shoplifts and Cheats of Both Sexes, 1719

    January 17, 2018

  • (adjective) - (1) Fire-bitten. Spoken of oatmeal &c. that is overdried.

    --Francis Grose's Glossary of Provincial and Local Words, 1811

    (2) Burnt, overheated, dried; fire-fangitness, the state of being overheated, burnt.

    --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

    (3) Cheese is said to be firefangit when it is swelled and cracked, and has received a peculiar taste in consequence of being exposed to much heat before it has been dried.

    --John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A circus.

    --Maurice Weseen's Dictionary of American Slang, 1934

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A state of baldness; found in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

    --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Originally, a rhyme or piece of poetry used in charming and killing rats. The term . . . came to mean halting metres, doggerel, a tirade of nonsense.

    --David Donaldson's Supplement to Jamieson's Scottish Dictionary, 1887

    (2) The fanciful idea that rats were commonly rhymed to death, in Ireland, arose probably from some metrical charm or incantation used there for that purpose.

    --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    (3) Rhime them to death, as they do in Irish rats / In drumming tunes.

    --Ben Jonson's Poetaster, 1601

    January 17, 2018

  • (adverb) - In arrears as to the discharge of one's liabilities; probably formed on the analogy of beforehand.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - Marriage; from yoke-mate, a yoke-fellow.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

    January 17, 2018

  • (noun) - A father-in-law; also, a step-father; 1500s-1600s.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    January 17, 2018

  • was the Anglo-Saxon name for May because in that month they began to milk their cows three times daily. William Carr's Dialect of Craven (1828) described beesting pudding as "a pudding made of beest, the first milk after a cow calves." When this happened, it was customary for a farmer to offer beest to his neighbors.

    January 17, 2018

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