nycanthro has looked up 0 words, created 2 lists, listed 117 words, written 90 comments, added 54 tags, and loved 21 words.

Comments by nycanthro

  • A way of singing popularized in the southern United States whereby some syllables were vocalized by breathing inward. Often used as a gerund (i.e., Eefing)

    April 25, 2009

  • Thanks bilby, I know I'm kinda lazy, treating this place like a wiktionary with live operators (not that my queries are generally heeded) LOL.

    That said, I doubt I could find a decent Wolof translation of 'Leprechaun'. But stranger things have happened.

    When I lived in Kalamazoo (Woolloomoolloo's much colder sister city) I had the opportunity to experience snowfall again for the first time with a Senegalese exchange student named Mamadou. I still get a chuckle remembering that giant of a man taking tentative baby steps trying to avoid a pratfall on the slippery cobblestones of Academy street.

    You make great lists.

    March 9, 2009

  • Everything I know of Wolof I learned from Senegalese cab drivers and sidewalk vendors in my city. I can't spell anything, as it was all transmitted orally, but I'm partial to an uncommon response to "How are you?" (nan ga def) "I'm walking around in circles".

    I'd love to know how to write them. Can the author of this list provide some original spellings (or anyone else for that matter)? Also, I'd love to know how to tell a Wolof speaker that they make me feel like a leprechaun because they're generally so tall and statuesque. Really lovely people, in my experience.

    March 9, 2009

  • It's the only Maldivian word in English (that I know of).

    March 6, 2009

  • As an adjective it could connote the "ultramodern" sense of having all imaginable forms of human knowledge within the breadth of a few keystrokes.

    Ex. "I thoroughly enjoy the fingertip accessibility of Wordie vocab."

    March 5, 2009

  • See also: The Bedazzler.

    March 5, 2009

  • It's a word!

    "Gently places mini-cupcake on sarra's outstuck tongue."

    --Chained_Bear

    For full convo click here.

    I imagine the infinitive would be "to outstick," which sounds less organic than "outstuck". Does anyone (e.g., qroqqa) know the term for words that are generally most accepted in an alternate tense?

    March 5, 2009

  • March 5, 2009

  • A cocktail consisting of tequila, cherry juice and buttermilk reputed to have been favored by Janis Joplin. She was also afraid of toilets, enjoyed eating live cats and had knees that bent in the wrong direction. That is, if you believe Frank (Judah Friedlander)'s Wikipedia article.

    March 5, 2009

  • I remember seeing references to this in Camille Paglia's magnum opus Sexual Personae. I think she used the "orobros" spelling. But I can't for the life of me find it. The book is nearly 1,000 pages long. Does anyone remember the context?

    March 5, 2009

  • Thanks for the hyperlink, Whichbe.

    March 5, 2009

  • I haven't had any complaints :>P But I require that you dress like an Indian, policeman, construction worker or cowboy.

    March 5, 2009

  • Or should it be "bologna"?

    March 5, 2009

  • I agree. Nice list. Runs a strange and wonderful gamut.

    March 5, 2009

  • Compare with deasil.

    March 5, 2009

  • Side-splitting. Asativum's matter-of-fact, conversational tone cinched it for me. I remember a story from Alan Lomax's ethnomusicological adventures in the Hebrides wherein he described the songs women would sing to keep rhythm while stretching wool soaked in urine. I had the same sort of question: who was the first to add urine to the recipe? Did they get their own holiday?

    March 5, 2009

  • Great list. Favorited. I had a good laugh this past week with mariquita, culture vulture and febuary. May just be me, though. I'm new here.

    March 5, 2009

  • Then there's Culluluddite, for those who fiercely believe cellulite diminishes attractiveness.

    March 5, 2009

  • See "the rural juror."

    March 5, 2009

  • Yes! And then, of course, there was the sequel to this Kevin Grisham (John Grisham's fictitious(?) brother) novel "Urban Fervor."

    I've added your words to the list, C_B. Thanks!

    March 5, 2009

  • I lived there for two non-consecutive years. It comes from a Native American language meaning "boiling cauldron". Some thing to do with the river.

    March 4, 2009

  • A few years ago I took an Italian course and was picking it up fairly easily, because it is so close to Spanish. I decided to head over to a park in Brooklyn where there is a bocce court and see if I could join the old Italian men in a game. My hope was to practice Italian and maybe even pick up some juicy, non-textbook words in the process. It didn't pan out too well. The men themselves were extremely nice, but the Sicilian and Calabrian dialects they spoke were so far removed from what is considered to be "Standard Italian" as to be unhelpful for my purposes. They told me to take heart as they often had to substitute English words even among one another because, as they put it, Sicilian Italian changes from village to village -- sometimes drastically. Still, it's a nice memory. Some of those guys were amazingly accurate players for septuagenarians.

    March 4, 2009

  • Gross. But kinda cool. Did he add garlic?

    March 4, 2009

  • We actually have an Idiotarod here in the U.S. Go figure.

    March 4, 2009

  • Can she play "my heart bleeds for you"?

    I've got one:
    How many Jewish mothers does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

    It's O.K. Bubbe, I'll just sit here in the dark.

    TB your portmanteaux are tres amusants! Are they of your own creation?

    March 4, 2009

  • That should've narrowed down the list of potential culprits. I suspect an angry Swede with a bone to pick and a love of symbolism.

    March 4, 2009

  • In noun form it signifies an imitation product, generally of lesser quality.

    March 4, 2009

  • I'm allergic to lion down. I use the knock-off, made from buzzard feathers. It's actually quite haute couture. Brand name: Culture Vulture.

    And so here we are.

    March 4, 2009

  • I think it can also have the sense of "fading" -- like a memory or an old photograph.

    Me estan gustando bastante tus palabras, Sionnach.

    March 4, 2009

  • That's a thing, right?

    March 4, 2009

  • "Now you and I know that a woman's foot, which had been twisted and scarred by the binding, would not be something you and I would find especially sexy. But for the men of China, for almost a thousand years, there was something precious about this, the lowest part of the body, shrunk down to two or three inches, done so in such a way that is was useless for walking, for moving about. Feet that were twisted and torn, exuding their own peculiar smell, and the men were struck with passion. They called it the golden lotus, in honor of the flower before it bloomed.

    The feet were carefully hidden, so that when men were finally allowed to see it, to touch it, to kiss it, to caress it, to suck nuts from between the twisted toes (often the whole dipped in tea) --- they would go bananas."

    Wang Ping
    (University of Minnesota)


    March 3, 2009

  • Hilarious. Is that a real word or are you just poo-pooing me?

    If it has a name I can get a doctor's note and take a much-needed vacation to the Library of Congress.

    March 3, 2009

  • CODE NAME: Harry A. Merkin.

    Mostly, I busted up prostitution rings. Ah, another life. *sigh*

    In related merkin news -- and in an attempt to remain true to this list -- the Spanish have separate words for head lice (piojos) and pubic lice (ladillas). Do lice count as fauna?

    Should I be worried that most of the discussions I've participated in today have quickly devolved into talk of bodily functions and afflictions?

    March 3, 2009

  • Unfortunaately I can't delete the term, as I only added the "definition". That stinks. LOL

    March 3, 2009

  • Either way, I still wind up feeling inadequate. Plus, I can't sleep now because the ugly head is trying to convince me to accompany it on a killing spree.

    March 3, 2009

  • That's really sweet, Lea. Not at all creepy. :>P

    *locks closet door*

    March 3, 2009

  • David Sedaris has a hilarious story about his adventures using the Stadium Pal. Yes people, the future is now!

    March 3, 2009

  • Oh, I thought she meant it was an antonym of bookish. And my intellectual inadequacy rears its ugly head once again.

    March 3, 2009

  • You know yarb, I think it may be the only spelling. That's why I had to define it myself, without citations from 19th century novelists. Please don't mention this to dontcry -- she already called me a dullard.

    March 3, 2009

  • Dullard?! How dare you, you culture vulture! And I thought for sure -- judging from the "more about:" section of his profile -- that qroqqa would be the first to use that word to describe me.

    March 3, 2009

  • My parents kept an extensive library when I was growing up. I found the smell of the older, musty, yellowed books to be the most intoxicating.

    There's a company called Demeter that makes strange fragrances some might find inspired, while others might place them in the same box as mandles. They have a cologne called paperback that I found uncanny in its ability to evoke such immediate, gleeful nostalgia.

    March 3, 2009

  • OMFG, I'm totally gonna employ that as a slur against Wordies who poo-poo my affinity for neologisms, folkspeak, netspeak and vocab derived from oral language and television sitcoms.

    What's the antonym of "bookish"?

    March 3, 2009

  • In its hyphenated form, this is a verb meaning 'to thumb one's nose at,' 'scoff,' 'mock' or 'treat with derision.'

    March 3, 2009

  • Butterfly? Is that an Aussieism? Here in Mer'ca we calls 'em 'Lardwasps.'

    On another note, the word for the 'monarch butterfly' has an almost invariably equivalent meaning across the board in European languages. Some examples:

    Portuguese - Barboleta-monarca
    Spanish - Mariposa monarca
    Czech - Monarcha stěhovavý
    Dutch - Monarchvlinder
    German - Monarchfalter
    Italian - Monarca
    Polish - Monarcha
    Hungarian - Pompás királylepke (the latter word meaning 'monarch')
    Finnish - Monarkkiperhonen
    Swedish - Monark
    Romanian - Fluture Monarh
    Danish - Monark

    and so on.

    March 3, 2009

  • I don't recall ever hearing this song. Although the title rings a bell. Should I YouTube it or leave my ears worm free?

    You know, a co-worker actually yelled at me when I told her I'd never seen The Godfather or On The Waterfront. Jeez, I seem to be doing my damndest to reveal my appalling lack of culture. Did I mention I majored in anthropology?

    *ponders peddling his Godfather virginity on ebay for a quick buck*

    March 3, 2009

  • Sounds like it means "unembellished stories." Literally, "tales without feathers." Am I right?

    March 3, 2009

  • Castilian Spanish word for ladybug (known as 'ladybird' in the English-speaking world outside of North America). It is also a mildly offensive term for gay men. In certain contexts it can be meant affectionately.

    In Catalonia, they are known as 'marietes' or 'poriols,' while in Galicia they are called 'xoaniñas' as well as 'maruxiñas' and 'reirreis.'

    Anyone know the Basque term?

    March 3, 2009

  • Feel free to add words and phrases to the list.

    I must confess, I have no television, but rent Netflix. When seasons 1 and 2 of 30 Rock became available to watch online, I got addicted. Now I just incessantly play them in the background on my computer while doing housework and have subsequently memorized A LOT of the dialogue. Lame, I know. Meh.

    March 3, 2009

  • Nycanthro is NYC (because I live in Brooklyn) plus ANTHRO (because I was an anthropology/ethnology major many moons ago). I checked your Flickr link. You're a Brooklynite too?! Awesome. Small world. What 'hood are you from?

    P.S. that Sailor Moon list is hilarious. The mere IDEA is funny enough. I think I might change my story regarding the derivation of my name now. Also, why did you choose to name yourself after a defunct branch of the rabbit family (I had to look it up, obviously).

    March 3, 2009

  • Susurrar. A beautiful Spanish word meaning "to whisper." It can also be applied to the lazy ebb and flow of ocean tides, rustling leaves or a velvety springtime zephyr. Mmmmmh.

    March 2, 2009

  • Any time I've heard this word uttered, it was as a playful insult suggesting that a person of English (i.e., non-Celtic) extraction was somehow 'lesser than'. I've always found it weird how sometimes a word for what a person is, can be transformed into an epithet by mere tone or context without needing to be qualified by an adjective. For example, "Jew," "goy," and, ever increasingly, "American." LOL.

    March 2, 2009

  • Available here if you're interested. Sung by Tracy Morgan as his character Tracy Jordan.

    March 2, 2009

  • I rather like "chillax". Reminds me of languid summer nights on my friend's rooftop listening to Marley and drinking gin&tonics;.

    Feminazi is pretty deplorable. And way too broadly applied.

    Any opinions on infotain, imagineer or Blacksploitation?

    March 2, 2009

  • There's a bakery/restaurant near my campus with decent coffee and overpriced, delicious pastries and breads called Le Pain Quotidien, which, of course is from the French meaning "daily beating." Reminds me of my childhood in the 1980's New York City school system.

    March 2, 2009

  • How about "wocka wocka wocka"? I guess it would be more aptly attributed to Fozzie Bear, but the Seinfeldian 'yada yada yada' sense is purely Savage's. So glad to see this list. It's the first column I flip to when I pick up The Village Voice. Now that the newspaper has fired almost all of their writers, it's often the only thing I flip to. *sigh*

    Oh, and Savage has a podcast, too!

    March 2, 2009

  • I realized that a bit later. Still learning the ropes around here and trying not to drown in this logophilic wellspring. I'm guessing now that you're Aussie? Anyhow, it's a pleasure to make your cybernetic acquaintance.

    March 2, 2009

  • Thanks for the research Chained_Bear! Oh, and thanks for the warm welcome, too. I actually rated on the "most comments" list, at a mere 152 comments less than bilby (is he gainfully employed?) By the by, I did in fact mean Acadian. And my Kentuckian co-worker had no idea what I was talking about, even when I threw in the 'nuts' reference.

    March 1, 2009

  • True story: I recently hosted two beautiful women visiting from the Netherlands. They went out to a movie while I was at work. We planned to meet up afterwards at an old Irish pub to have a pint and discuss the day's events. I got there about a half hour before they did and downed a pint of Guinness, looking a tad pathetic surrounded by merry couples.

    When they finally did arrive we grabbed a table and started talking about all of the new vocabulary they were picking up during their trip. They thanked me for introducing them to the phrase "chick flick" and inquired about another word they heard in the movie.

    "What does 'fez' mean?" Katrien asked.

    "What, like the hat?"

    "No, it's a word that I think means sperm," she said in a hushed voice.

    "You mean jizz?" I asked.

    Their faces lit up with glee.

    "Jizz! YES! Jizz!" they exclaimed in unison.

    All heads turned in our direction. Then, a minute or two later, a man got up to leave and patted me on the shoulder on his way out without saying a word.

    March 1, 2009

  • My bad. Thought I was on to something.

    March 1, 2009

  • Add capers and mwah!

    February 28, 2009

  • P.S. Biff!

    February 28, 2009

  • Question -- and I may be on a completely different wavelength here -- but did the hypothermia reference elicit your "I want to go there" quote? Are you American, even?

    February 28, 2009

  • The only known synthetic aphrodisiac.

    February 28, 2009

  • Yes!! A 30 Rock fan!! Has HULU been worded yet? This is fun.

    February 28, 2009

  • I found it here and elsewhere on the net. Seems to run dangerously close to the sentiments behind the embarrassing, ill-fated Gay Bomb fiasco.

    February 28, 2009

  • Chess rates very high on some people's libidometers. Have faith, Bilby! (But hold on to that jacket).

    February 28, 2009

  • I nearly plotzed when I came upon manorexia and bromance -- multiple times! Not that I enjoy gossip columns. It's just for research, you see.

    February 28, 2009

  • Always makes me think of Blanche Devereaux carrying a tray of ice tea.

    February 28, 2009

  • *discreetly places page in pocket*

    February 28, 2009

  • Great list! I've got "up, near, shadow, case and scumbag" on mine.

    February 28, 2009

  • Hey Bilby, go grab your jacket, YOU'VE SCORED!!!

    February 28, 2009

  • Working for attorneys, I've often marked the definitions section of a document with the phrase "please transpose (these words) to retain alphabeticity." It's supposed to be a tongue-in-cheek comment on legalese, but no one gets it. I'm such a rebel.

    February 28, 2009

  • Mittelschmerz!

    February 28, 2009

  • Interesting article. I love how it concludes with the story of "a middle-aged Australian woman had no idea she was leaving her house at night and having sex with random strangers." Wonder what finally tipped her off.

    February 28, 2009

  • Actually, he was forced to change his surname as

    Hamburger University
    has "McLearn" copyrighted and threatened to sue.



    *ponders adding "Hamburgerology" to his list*

    February 28, 2009

  • Wow, thanks for all the helpful hints re: Doric and Scots. You're obviously a major player on the Wordie circuit. And Scottish to boot. Lucky us.

    February 28, 2009

  • I'm still fond of the purple stuff. And Sunny D!! *Young group of racially mixed kids with skateboards begins to cheer*

    February 27, 2009

  • I place my American tongue in the R position, but at the speed of sound it rarely if ever comes out more intelligibly than Feb-oo-erry. I've given in. Excetera is next. Like hypothermia, it's a lot more pleasurable if you just let yourself go limp with acceptance. The numb comfort of knowing that March is just around the corner. Although, even March is not without its ides, so beware.

    February 27, 2009

  • Nice word. Never heard it before. I will attempt to use it nonchalantly with a Kentucky-born coworker and let you know how it turns out (cus direct askin ain't no fun no how, shoot). Merriam-Webster says it comes from the French 'galimafree' meaning a type of stew; hence the hodgepodgey notion. Could it be Arcadian in origin?

    February 27, 2009

  • Don't give up. You can work it out! Marriage is hard, but that's what makes it a valuable institution.

    Signed,

    Jimmy Singleton

    February 27, 2009

  • Is this word not of Jamaican origin?

    February 27, 2009

  • (Alt. Aristoblack) I first heard it used to describe Andre Leon Talley, the African-American Vogue editor-at-large, but have subsequently heard it used to refer to very wealthy black people, especially older men and women associated with 'high culture'.

    February 27, 2009

  • Does it really mean "glowing sole" in Icelandic?

    February 27, 2009

  • In Spanish, it means "affectionate" (feminine form). It's used to describe a dog who nuzzles or licks a lot, for example. The verb "mimar" means to pamper or spoil. But I think the drink is related to the Brazilian Portuguese word for a tangerine-like citrus fruit. Maybe I'm wrong. I'm no help. Had one too many mimosas tonight.

    February 27, 2009

  • Bilby, what's the difference between Doric and Scots? I mentioned Scots because my mother is from Aberdeen and she used the word 'quine' to mean a young girl (the male equivalent being 'loon'). My mother referred to her language (when she wasn't speaking American English) as Scots. I've never heard people refer to themselves as speaking "Doric".

    February 27, 2009

  • This is more of a Scottish Gaelic or Irish word. I think it comes from their word for "Saxon". Can someone confirm this? My Googling finger has gang agley. Ta.

    February 27, 2009

  • A young girl in Scots language.

    February 21, 2009

  • Uttered, no doubt, while plucking petals from a tulip.

    February 12, 2009

  • I'm a fan of 'niggardly.' It's been known to get people fired.

    January 27, 2009

  • Crap, yes, infix. D'oh!

    January 21, 2009

  • -damn- is English's lesser known second interfix.

    see also guaran-goddamn-tee

    January 20, 2009

  • Most often used in the plural. (I personally have never heard it used otherwise NorthAtlantic U.S.) Mischief attributed to a person.

    January 20, 2009

  • In Brooklyn, New York (and other parts of the metropolitan north Atlantic region) the verb 'to scumbag' means to mislead, betray or fool another person. It is synonymous with the equally colloquial 'fuck over.' Often used in the past tense.
    Ex. I got scumbagged by a couple of Israelis running blow by Coney Island. Half that shit was corn starch."

    or

    The car service tried to scumbag me. $27.50 from Flatbush to Stillwell! I took the train.

    January 20, 2009

  • Can someone use the last two verb forms of this word in a sentence?

    January 20, 2009

  • I dig it in verb form, as in 'stakes,' 'ante,' 'dose,' etc.

    January 20, 2009

  • All vowels used once, plus it sounds cool.

    January 20, 2009

  • 1888, "motion picture theater," from nickel "five-cent coin" (the cost to view one) + -odeon, as in Melodeon (1840) "music hall," ult. from Gk. oideion "building for musical performances." Meaning "nickel jukebox" is first attested 1938. (From etymonline.com)

    January 20, 2009

  • Cool, it uses all of the vowels once. I hadn't noticed that. Oneupmanship.

    December 30, 2008

Comments for nycanthro

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  • Nycanthro! Let's say I have something to do with New York, Brooklyn (where I live) and (physical) anthropology. This is why I was curious.
    For more info on Prolagus, and the reason why I chose this username, visit that page, ça va sans dire. *smiles*

    March 6, 2009

  • If I could get away with it I'd have it playing in the background too!

    March 3, 2009

  • I'm guessing notorious yellow canoodling anthropophagus beast.

    March 2, 2009

  • Just one question: does Nycanthro mean what one could imagine? If so, please have a look at my Flickr sets. :)

    March 2, 2009

  • You're fitting in just fine. My pleasure too.

    March 2, 2009

  • HAHAHA i just giggled for about two minutes or so

    March 2, 2009

  • Actually I'm not Scottish. I did live in Inverness for 3 months in 2007, during which time I:
    - became addicted to Wordie
    - learned to appreciate rain, rain
    - started my list of Scots words
    - watched a bit of football, and giant seagulls joyriding on city buses, and derived pleasure from both
    - etc.; you can ask me more, for most of my life consists of secrets closely guarded from my own fears.

    March 1, 2009

  • An Australian politician, in fact candidate for Prime Minister, once ran a campaign on the basis of Incentivation, his plan for the reviving the country. The campaign bombed, largely because no-one really grokked the word and those who did abhorred it anyway.
    Somewhat later John Howard did in fact become PM. He'd learnt his lesson and ran a campaign that wasn't based firmly upon a nonce word.

    February 27, 2009

  • I guess it was a mistake: see mistagging.

    January 21, 2009