Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to the Netherlands or its people or culture.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Dutch language.
  • adj. Archaic German.
  • adj. Archaic Of or relating to any of the Germanic peoples or languages.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Pennsylvania Dutch.
  • n. The people of the Netherlands.
  • n. Archaic A Germanic people.
  • n. The Pennsylvania Dutch.
  • n. The official West Germanic language of the Netherlands and one of the official languages of Belgium.
  • n. Archaic One or more of the West Germanic languages of Germany, Switzerland, and the Low Countries.
  • n. See Pennsylvania Dutch.
  • n. Slang Anger or temper.
  • idiom go Dutch To pay one's own expenses on a date or outing.
  • idiom in Dutch In disfavor or trouble.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. German.
  • adj. Pertaining to the Dutch, the Germans, and the Goths; Germanic, Teutonic.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Netherlands, the Dutch people or the Dutch language.
  • adj. In a shared manner; of a shared expense.
  • proper n. The main language of the Netherlands and Flanders (i.e., the northern half of Belgium).
  • proper n. The people from the Netherlands.
  • proper n. The main language of the Holy Roman Empire (Germany, Austria, Alsace, Luxembourg)
  • proper n. A German.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants.
  • n. The people of Holland; Dutchmen.
  • n. The language spoken in Holland.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to the Teutonic or German race, including the Low German (Low Dutch) and the High German (High Dutch). See II. Specifically
  • Of or pertaining to the Low Germans or to their language, particularly to the inhabitants of Holland; Hollandish; Netherlandish: formerly called specifically Low Dutch.
  • The word Dutch in this sense came to have in several phrases an opprobrious or humorous application, perhaps due in part to the animosity engendered by the long and severe contest for the supremacy of the seas waged by England and the Netherlands in the seventeenth century. See Dutch auction, courage, defense, etc.
  • Of or pertaining to the High Germans or to their language: formerly called specifically High Dutch.
  • n. The Teutonic or Germanic race; the German peoples generally: used as a plural.
  • n. Specifically The Low Germans, particularly the people of Holland, or the kingdom of the Netherlands; the Dutchmen; the Hollanders: called specifically the Low Dutch: used as a plural.
  • n. The High Germans; the inhabitants of Germany; the Germans: formerly called specifically the High Dutch: used as a plural.
  • n. The Teutonic or Germanic language, including all its forms. See 5, 6.
  • n. The language spoken in the Netherlands; the Hollandish language (which differs very slightly from the Flemish, spoken in parts of the adjoining kingdom of Belgium): called distinctively Low Dutch.
  • n. The language spoken by the Germans; German; High German: formerly, and still occasionally (as in the United States, especially where the two races are mingled), called distinctively High Dutch.
  • n. The common white clover, Trifolium repens: an abbreviation of Dutch clover.
  • n. [lowercase] A kind of linen tape.
  • To clarify and harden by immersing in heated sand, as goose-quills.
  • n. A form of the child's game of jumping the rope in which two ropes are used.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the people of the Netherlands
  • adj. of or relating to the Netherlands or its people or culture
  • n. the West Germanic language of the Netherlands

Etymologies

Middle English Duch, German, Dutch, from Middle Dutch Dūtsch.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English Duch ("German, Low Countryman"), from Middle Dutch dūtsch, duutsc (modern Duits ("German")), northern variant of dietsc (compare modern Diets ("Dutch language")), from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (compare German Deutsch ("German"), Old English þēodisc ("of the people")), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō ‘people’, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂. See also Derrick, Teuton, Teutonic. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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