Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A member of a Germanic people that invaded northern Italy in the sixth century A.D. and established a kingdom in the Po River valley. Also called Langobard.
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
  • n. A banker or moneylender.
  • Lombard, Peter 1100?-1160? Italian theologian whose four-volume Sentences (1148-1151) served as the standard textbook in theology for several centuries.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A member of a Germanic people who invaded Italy in the 6th century; a Langobard.
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
  • n. A banker or moneylender.
  • proper n. A romance language spoken in northern Italy and southern Switzerland, see Wikipedia:Lombard language.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Lombardy, or the inhabitants of Lombardy.
  • proper n. A native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
  • proper n. A money lender or banker; -- so called because the business of banking was first carried on in London by Lombards.
  • proper n. Same as Lombard-house.
  • proper n. A form of cannon formerly in use.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A native or an inhabitant of Lombardy in Italy; more specifically, a member of the Germanic tribe (Longobards) who about a. d. 568, under Alboin, conquered the part of northern Italy still called Lombardy, and founded the kingdom of that name, which was afterward extended over a much larger territory, and was finally overthrown by Charlemagne in 774.
  • Of or pertaining to Lombardy or the Lombards.
  • n. A banker or money-broker or -lender.
  • n. [lowercase] A bank for loans; a broker's shop; a pawnbroker's shop. See lumber.
  • n. Hence [lowercase] A public institution for lending money to the poor at a moderate interest on articles deposited and pledged; a montde-piété.
  • n. Milit., a cannon of heavy caliber in the later middle ages and in the sixteenth century: probably derived from northern Italy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th century

Etymologies

Middle English Lumbarde, from Old French lombard, from Old Italian lombardo, from Medieval Latin lombardus, from Latin Langobardus, Longobardus. Sense 3, from the prominence of Lombards in 13th-century banking.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English Lombard, Lumbard, from the merger of Old English Longbeard ("Lombard"); and Old French Lombard, Lombart ("a Lombard"), from Late Latin Longobardus, Langobardus ("a Lombard"), of Germanic origin, derived from the Proto-Germanic elements *langaz + *bardaz; equivalent to long +‎ beard. Some sources derive the second element instead from Proto-Germanic *bardōn, *barduz (“axe”), related to German Barte ("axe"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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