Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Growth or increase in size by gradual external addition, fusion, or inclusion.
  • n. Something contributing to such growth or increase: "the accretions of paint that had buried the door's details like snow” ( Christopher Andreae).
  • n. Biology The growing together or adherence of parts that are normally separate.
  • n. Geology Slow addition to land by deposition of water-borne sediment.
  • n. Geology An increase of land along the shores of a body of water, as by alluvial deposit.
  • n. Astronomy An increase in the mass of a celestial object by the collection of surrounding interstellar gases and objects by gravity.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of increasing by natural growth; especially the increase of organic bodies by the internal accession of parts; organic growth.
  • n. The act of increasing, or the matter added, by an accession of parts externally; an extraneous addition; as, an accretion of earth.
  • n. Something added externally to promote growth the external growth of an item.
  • n. concretion; coherence of separate particles; as, the accretion of particles so as to form a solid mass.
  • n. A growing together of parts naturally separate, as of the fingers or toes.
  • n. The gradual increase of land by deposition of water-borne sediment.
  • n. The adhering of property to something else, by which the owner of one thing becomes possessed of a right to another; generally, gain of land by the washing up of sand or sail from the sea or a river, or by a gradual recession of the water from the usual watermark.
  • n. Gain to an heir or legatee, failure of a coheir to the same succession, or a co-legatee of the same thing, to take his share.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of increasing by natural growth; esp. the increase of organic bodies by the internal accession of parts; organic growth.
  • n. The act of increasing, or the matter added, by an accession of parts externally; an extraneous addition.
  • n. Concretion; coherence of separate particles.
  • n. A growing together of parts naturally separate, as of the fingers or toes.
  • n.
  • n. The adhering of property to something else, by which the owner of one thing becomes possessed of a right to another; generally, gain of land by the washing up of sand or soil from the sea or a river, or by a gradual recession of the water from the usual watermark.
  • n. Gain to an heir or legatee, by failure of a coheir to the same succession, or a co-legatee of the same thing, to take his share.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of accreting or accrescing; a growing to; an increase by natural growth; an addition; specifically, an increase by an accession of parts externally.
  • n. In pathology, the growing together of parts normally separate, as the fingers or toes.
  • n. The thing added; an extraneous addition; an accession: commonly used in the plural, and restricted to accessions made slowly and gradually by some external force.
  • n. In law: The increase or growth of property by external accessions, as by alluvium naturally added to land situated on the bank of a river, or on the seashore.
  • n. In Scots law, the completion of an originally defective or imperfect right by some subsequent act on the part of the person from whom the right was derived.
  • n. In forestry, increase in diameter or height: distinguished from increment, increase in volume.
  • n. In petrol., a term proposed by Johnston-Lavis for a mass formed in solution by deposition about a nucleus, as in oölite, or upon the walls of a cavity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. something contributing to growth or increase
  • n. (biology) growth by addition as by the adhesion of parts or particles
  • n. (geology) an increase in land resulting from alluvial deposits or waterborne sediment
  • n. (astronomy) the formation of a celestial object by the effect of gravity pulling together surrounding objects and gases
  • n. (law) an increase in a beneficiary's share in an estate (as when a co-beneficiary dies or fails to meet some condition or rejects the inheritance)
  • n. an increase by natural growth or addition

Etymologies

Latin accrētiō, accrētiōn-, from accrētus, past participle of accrēscere, to grow; see accrue.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The Reserve's marshes and beaches are among the best-studied sites nationally with regard to long-term accretion and erosion (over thousands of years).

    Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, Maine

  • Analysts said even with the lack of immediate accretion to earnings per share as a potential negative, Williams can make a compelling case for long-term accretion from the deal.

  • And it seems that people are anticipating a turn in the commodity cycle, and private enterprises that don't have to worry at all about near-term accretion dilution or a mass in power plants on the idea that the forward price curve is about to turn in a positive direction.

  • Maybe talk about what type of intermediate-term accretion you expect to get from both the Omnium and the Bank of Ireland securities deal.

  • BGH unitholders would result in dilution of BPL's distributable cash flow per unit of approximately 6 percent to 7 percent in 2011, but expects long-term accretion due to the benefits of the merger, including the elimination of incentive distributions currently being paid to BGH.

    Marketwire - Breaking News Releases

  • What could be more extreme than the conditions of the swirling cloud of matter surrounding a black hole, known as the accretion disk?

    Could a Black Hole Fit in Your Computer or In Your Pocket? | Universe Today

  • The accreted matter forms a disk called accretion disk.

    Launchpad Day 3: More WIRO, now with open dome

  • The scientists for the first time, observed the vertical launch of rotating winds from glowing disks of gas, known as accretion disks, surrounding supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies.

    Speedlinking 11/1/07

  • The earth at first was a ball of red-hot, semimolten material formed by accretion, which is the violent accumulation of heavy debris left over from the exploding star.

    The Source

  • She had grown weary and detached, and since she affected me as more impressed with the evil of the world than with the good, this was a gain; in other words her accretion of indifference, if not of cynicism, showed a softer surface than that of her old ambitions.

    Louisa Pallant

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