Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A disorder marked by loss of the ability to write.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A loss of the ability to write (usually referring to a brain injury)
  • n. The inability to write

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The absence or loss of the power of expressing ideas by written signs. It is one form of aphasia.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A form of cerebral disorder in which there is a partial or total loss of the power of expressing ideas by written symbols.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a loss of the ability to write or to express thoughts in writing because of a brain lesion

Etymologies

a-1 + Greek graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots + -ia1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Head injuries that harm the parietal lobe can also impair the ability to focus on one object at a time, write words ( '' agraphia ''), and name objects ( '' anomia '').

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • (I can quite understand that the reader will rub his eyes at these words and suspect the printer of some sort of agraphia.)

    The Shape of Things to Come

  • If the patient is enable to write, the condition is known as agraphia.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • [8] Head injuries that harm the parietal lobe can also impair the ability to focus on one object at a time, write words (agraphia), and name objects (anomia).

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Head injuries that harm the parietal lobe can also impair the ability to focus on one object at a time, write words (agraphia), and name objects

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Head injuries that harm the parietal lobe can also impair the ability to focus on one object at a time, write words (agraphia), and name objects (anomia).

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • [10] Head injuries that harm the parietal lobe can also impair the ability to focus on one object at a time, write words (agraphia), and name objects (anomia).

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Pure alexia, unaccompanied by any difficulty in writing ("alexia sine agraphia") is not that uncommon, although it usually comes on suddenly, following a stroke or other brain injury.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Two of the four have essentially the same disorder, "alexia sine agraphia", which means inability to read while retaining the ability to write.

    The Guardian World News

  • Pure word blindness (alexia no agraphia): Here the patient can speak normally and comprehend what is spoken; he can also write spontaneously and to dictation, but reading comprehension is impaired.

    British Blogs

Comments

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  • Foreman used this word in an episode once when a patient had trouble writing something.

    June 10, 2012