Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See alluvium.
  • n. The flow of water against a shore or bank.
  • n. Inundation by water; flood.
  • n. Law The increasing of land area along a shore by deposited alluvium or by the recession of water.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The increase in the area of land due to the deposition of sediment (alluvium) by a river.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Wash or flow of water against the shore or bank.
  • n. An overflowing; an inundation; a flood.
  • n. Matter deposited by an inundation or the action of flowing water; alluvium.
  • n. An accession of land gradually washed to the shore or bank by the flowing of water. See Accretion.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Formerly— The wash of the sea against the shore, or of a river against its banks.
  • n. The material deposited by seas or rivers; alluvium (which see).
  • n. In modern legal use, an increase of land on a shore or a river-bank by the action of water, as by a current or by waves, whether from natural or from artificial causes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry land
  • n. clay or silt or gravel carried by rushing streams and deposited where the stream slows down
  • n. gradual formation of new land, by recession of the sea or deposit of sediment

Etymologies

Latin alluviō, alluviōn-, from alluere, to wash against : ad-, ad- + -luere, to wash; see leu(ə)- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The accessions, which are made to land, bordering upon rivers, follow the land, say the civilians, provided it be made by what they call alluvion, that is, insensibly and imperceptibly; which are circumstances, that assist the imagination in the conjunction.

    An Enquiry into the Principles of Morals

  • The accessions, which are made to lands bordering upon rivers, follow the land, say the civilians, provided it be made by what they call alluvion, that is, Insensibly and Imperceptibly; which are circumstances that mightily assist the imagination in the conjunction.

    A Treatise of Human Nature

  • The soil of the alluvion is warm, rich and productive; that of the uplands rather wet and cold, but excellent for pasture and meadow.

    Living in Dryden: July 2004 Archives

  • There is also another small stream, and there is an abundance of mill seats with considerable tracts of alluvion; though the general character is hilly with pretty lofty ridges.

    Living in Dryden: July 2004 Archives

  • Except at the season of floods, it is not navigable; but the alluvion through which it flows is very productive, while the pine forest immediately to the west is sterile.

    Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War

  • The Bayou Pierre, three hundred feet wide and too deep to ford, leaves the Red River a few miles below Shreveport, and after a long course, in which it frequently expands into lakes, returns to its parent stream three miles above Grand Ecore, dividing the pine-clad hills on the west from the alluvion of the river on the east.

    Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War

  • The alluvion between these rivers, protected from inundation by levees along the streams, is divided by many bayous, of which the Tensas, with its branch the Macon, is the most important.

    Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War

  • Navigable for more than a hundred miles, preserving at all seasons an equal breadth and depth, so gentle is its flow that it might be taken for a canal, did not the charming and graceful curves, by which it separates the undulating prairies of Attakapas from the alluvion of the Atchafalaya, mark it as the handiwork of Nature.

    Destruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War

  • The vale below, like that they had left, opened into a wider bottom-land, the bed of a creek, which they could see shining among the trees that overshadowed the rich alluvion; and into this poured a rivulet that chattered along through the glen at their feet, in which it had its sources.

    Nick of the Woods

  • There are two denominations of prairie: the upland, and the river or bottom prairie; the latter is more fertile than the former, having a greater body of alluvion, yet there are many of the upland prairies extremely rich, particularly those in the neighbourhood of the Wabash.

    A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America

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