Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. As if dead; lifeless; spiritless; dejected; depressed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. As if dead; lifeless; spiritless; dejected; depressed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Lifeless; spiritless; depressed: usually in the phrase all amort.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. utterly cast down

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lovesick [5369] Chaerea, when he came from Pamphila's house, and had not so good welcome as he did expect, was all amort, Parmeno meets him, quid tristis es?

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  •     Or that inert that son's vigour, amort to delight,

    Poems and Fragments

  • Blanck and all amort sits the poore Cutler, and with such a pittifull countenance, as his neighbours did not a little admire his solemne alteration, and desirous to know the cause thereof, from point to point he discourseth the whole manner of the tragedie, neuer naming his new customer, but with such a farre fetcht sigh, as soule and body would have parted in sunder.

    The Third and Last Part of Conny-Catching. (1592) With the new deuised knauish arte of Foole-taking

  • Or that inert that son's vigour, amort to delight.

    The Poems and Fragments of Catullus

  • Stephen, greeting, then all amort, followed a lubber jester, a wellkempt head, newbarbered, out of the vaulted cell into a shattering daylight of no thought.

    Ulysses

  • [Not a good thing, but _a charity_.] [325] "What, sweeting, all amort" (_Taming of the Shrew_).

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 2

  • Which verses, in a word, may have a spice and volupty, may have passion's cling and such like decency, so that they can incite with ticklings, I do not say boys, but bearded ones whose stiffened limbs amort lack pliancy in movement.

    The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus

  • Modern poets have given ‘amort’ a new life; it is used by Keats, by Bailey (_Festus_, xxx), and by Browning (_Sordello_, vi). ‘Bruit’ has been revived by Carlyle and Chas.

    English Past and Present

  • And then in terms of any changes, if you were to make changes to the amort or anything else in that bank facility, is there any provision in your agreement on the Oaktree facility, where they would have any say in your ability to make any changes to that bank facility?

  • So it would be 27 to 30 on D and 10 for the amort.

    SeekingAlpha.com: Home Page

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