Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the seventh month of the Hindu calendar

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • Ah, a fellow publishing type. :-)

    January 23, 2009

  • @reesetee I have worked briefly for Amazon Dev Centre Scotland so asin means one and only one thing to me;)

    January 23, 2009

  • Garyth, you beat me to it. :-)

    *hungry for cheese of any sort*

    January 23, 2009

  • rolig: formàio furlàn (see first comment) means "Friulian cheese" in Friulian, so you are probably right.

    January 20, 2009

  • bilby: Ha! By the way, statues of V.E. II are pretty common in most "Piazza d'Italia" in Italy.

    January 20, 2009

  • asino = ass, donkey in Spanish as well.

    January 20, 2009

  • Friulan, or Friulian is, I believe, a ?Rhaeto-Romanch dialect/language from the NE edge of Italy that borders Austria and Slovenia. The cheese is likely a local product of that region. See this reference for a start.

    January 20, 2009

  • If I remember correctly, asino does mean donkey/ass in Italian but the emphasis is on the first syllable. Hence the accent in asìno to distinguish it.

    Little anecdote for Pro: I first came across this word one dull Sunday afternoon. My girlfriend and I decided to walk around Piazza Italia asking people sitting in the park if they could identify the man on horseback glorified with a statue in the middle of the square. Seeing as we were both foreigners it was easy enough to pretend to be tourists wanting a name for the statue in the background of our photo. We asked about 20 people, only 1 of whom was able to correctly identify the statue. But my favourite reply was a classic Italian shrug followed by 'Ero un asino alla scuola.' - 'I was a donkey at school.'

    P.S. It was Vittorio Emanuele II.

    January 20, 2009

  • There was a cheese I used to buy in Toronto that was called simply Friulano. But when I asked for it recently at a well-stocked cheese counter in Ljubljana (and Slovenia is right next-door to Friuli so I was hopeful), they didn't seem to know what it was. Perhaps I should have asked for asin?

    January 20, 2009

  • No, asìno means "from Pieve d'Asio". Read here.

    January 20, 2009

  • Amazon Standard Identification Number

    January 20, 2009

  • Does this mean "donkey" cheese (cf. asinine)?

    January 20, 2009

  • Plus, dear WordNet, a cheese from Fiuli-Venezia Giulia (also known as formaggio asìno, formaggio salato del Friuli, formadi salmistrà, and formàio furlàn). There are two varieties: asìno classico and asìno morbido.

    January 20, 2009