Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One serving as an officer or owner of a bank.
  • n. Games The player in charge of the bank in some gambling games.
  • n. One engaged in cod fishing off Newfoundland.
  • n. A workbench used by a mason or sculptor.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who conducts the business of banking; one who, individually, or as a member of a company, keeps an establishment for the deposit or loan of money, or for traffic in money, bills of exchange, etc.
  • n. A money changer.
  • n. The dealer, or one who keeps the bank in a gambling house.
  • n. The stone bench on which a mason cuts or squares his work.
  • n. A vessel employed in the cod fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.
  • n. A ditcher; a drain digger.
  • n. A railway locomotive that can be attached to the rear of a train to assist it in climbing an incline.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who conducts the business of banking; one who, individually, or as a member of a company, keeps an establishment for the deposit or loan of money, or for traffic in money, bills of exchange, etc.
  • n. A money changer.
  • n. The dealer, or one who keeps the bank in a gambling house.
  • n. A vessel employed in the cod fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.
  • n. A ditcher; a drain digger.
  • n. The stone bench on which masons cut or square their work.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A vessel employed in the cod-fishery on the banks of Newfoundland.
  • n. The bench or table upon which bricklayers and stone-masons prepare and shape their material; a banket.
  • n. In sculpture, a modeler's bench provided with a circular platform turning on wheels so that the work can be revolved to expose any portion to the light.
  • n. A covering for a bench or seat, made of tapestry, rich stuff, or embroidered cloth.
  • n. A hanging for a church wall or screen; specifically, the curtains placed at the ends of an altar.
  • n. A ditcher; one engaged in embanking.
  • n. In hunting, a horse which can jump on and off field-banks too large to be cleared.
  • n. In Australia, a river full to the brim.
  • n. One who keeps a bank; one who traffics in money, receives and remits money, negotiates bills of exchange, etc.
  • n. The holder of the funds of a gaming establishment; in games of chance, that player who deposits a certain sum of money against which bets are made, or that player who for the sake of convenience receives and pays out bets won and lost.
  • n. One who makes a business of picking up wreckage on the coast.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a financier who owns or is an executive in a bank
  • n. the person in charge of the bank in a gambling game

Etymologies

From bank3, bench (obsolete).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From bank + -er, after French banquier (Wiktionary)
From bank (An elevation, or rising ground, under the sea) + -er (Wiktionary)
From bank (“an incline or hill”) +‎ -er. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Young company Waking Exploits are reviving this boisterous comedy and taking it out on tour at a moment in time when people's faith in financial institutions is at an all-time low and the word banker has almost become synonymous with villain.

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  • Banks will shave three hours from their business day whenever Brazil is on the pitch, adding new meaning to the term banker's hours.

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  • After several years of financial crisis, during which the word banker had become a catchall epithet for the undeserving rich, the global economy appeared to be on the mend.

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  • The piquancy of all this is that if the term banker is ever to be restored to its former prestige, the public and Wall St might reflect on one highly relevant example of a banker who was not a bankster.

    British Blogs

  • I agree with Mike Diehl those Gyrojets were as accurate as a banker is a warm caring human being.

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  • But if being a banker is a personal privilege, it is also a public right.

    The Business of Bank Mergers: A Sound Strategy for Canada

  • Of course, "banker" is hardly the right word -- these big corporations aren't exactly George Bailey's Building & Loan.

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  • LIMBAUGH: To some people, "banker" is code word for Jewish; and guess who Obama is assaulting?

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  • So for some people, "banker" is code word for "Jewish," and guess who Obama's assaulting?

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  • "To some people, 'banker' is code word for Jewish; and guess who Obama is assaulting?"

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