Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A rapidly expanding suburb

Etymologies

Blend of boom and suburb (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Lang says he coined boomburb for a 2001 report published by the Fannie Mae Foundation.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

  • "Boomburb was first used by Robert E. Lang, Ph. D., a professor of urban affairs and planning at Virginia Tech. Lang says he coined boomburb for a 2001 report published by the Fannie Mae Foundation.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

  • A boomburb is a rapidly growing, sprawling city of 100,000 or more on the edge of a major metropolitan area ..

    Consumer Reports Morning Update

  • A boomburb is a rapidly growing, sprawling city of 100,000 or more on the edge of a major metropolitan area.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

  • A boomburb is a rapidly growing, sprawling city of 100,000 or more on the edge of a major metropolitan area..

    Consumer Reports Morning Update

  • The word exurb dates from at least the 1950s; newer words on the model of "exurb" include "boomburb" (a rapidly growing, sprawling city of 100,000 or more on the edge of a major metropolitan area) and "slurb" (an area of unplanned suburban sprawl).

    Week in Words

  • "The place looked like somebody's utopia," he writes of Bellevue, Wash., a clean but characterless "boomburb" across Lake Washington from Seattle, "more a model city than an actual one, and it appeared to be inhabited by the kinds of people whom architects like to place as strolling figures in the foregrounds of watercolor sketches of their projects."

    An Englishman Lights Out

  • Boomburg and boomburb are often used interchangeably even though they're not one and the same.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

  • Boomburg and boomburb have returned to prominence as the battered housing market continues to plunge.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

  • A boomburb has the look and feel of a big city but generally lacks a large, vibrant downtown.

    Buzzword: Boomburg/Boomburb

Comments

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  • BLDGBLOG: 'In their 2007 book, Boomburbs: The Rise of America’s Accidental Cities, Lang and LeFurgy explain that many of the largest cities in the United States today are simply hypertrophied suburbs—they are boomburbs. The mayors of established cities have had a hard time adjusting to this fact. Mesa, Arizona, for instance, an otherwise anonymous tumescence on the air-conditioned desert edge of Phoenix, is a "stealth city": Its population, incredibly, is larger than both Minneapolis–St. Paul and Miami. The authors also describe how the mayor of Salt Lake City once "dismissed the idea" that his city might have anything in common with suburban North Las Vegas, "despite the fact that North Las Vegas is both bigger and more ethnically diverse than Salt Lake City." What these boomburbs have, in lieu of historic centrality and international name-recognition, is a flexible legal and financial infrastructure. They have water rights boards and waste disposal networks, even local schools and sales tax—and though they don’t necessarily have mayors (though some do), they have "landscape management" committees and homeowners associations. These are cities made up less by buildings than by tax codes and the law.'

    October 10, 2008