Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Flexible body armor of small metal plates or rings, often covered with cloth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A coat of armor for the body, consisting of scales or plates, sometimes overlapping each other, generally of metal, and sewn to linen or other material.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A coast of armor for the body, consisting of scales or plates, sometimes overlapping each other, generally of metal, and sewed to linen or other material. It was worn in the Middle Ages.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A medieval coat of fence made of linen or leather upon which overlapping scales of steel were sewed. The plates of steel were generally quilted between two thicknesses of stuff.
  • n. A foot-soldier wearing a brigandine; a brigand.
  • Made like a brigandine; of the nature of a brigandine: as, a brigandine garment.
  • n. An old form of brigantine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a medieval coat of chain mail consisting of metal rings sewn onto leather or cloth

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, armor for a skirmisher, from brigand, skirmisher; see brigand.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French brigandine, from brigand + -ine. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "But not," returned Monteith, "till I have disengaged you from your wet garments, and preserved your arms and brigandine from the rust of this night."

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • His clothing -- an olive-colored tunic, fawn breeches that tucked into calf-high leather boots, and skirted, scaled brigandine armor -- was expensive and immaculate.

    Stalling

  • He had finished adjusting and cleaning the hauberk and brigandine, and was now busily employed on a broad pavesse, or buckler, of unusual size, and covered with steel-plating, which Richard often used in reconnoitring, or actually storming fortified places, as a more effectual protection against missile weapons than the narrow triangular shield used on horseback.

    The Talisman

  • On his upper body he wore a long brigandine for armor, constructed from small metal plates riveted to a textile covering, for his build was too deformed for the fitted protection worn by his allies.

    The Black Angel

  • * One suit of Kydex -- plastic -- brigandine for chest and back 10-15 lbs

    Time to get back in the groove...

  • Etant en mailles, elle pouvoit 阾re fauss閑 plus ais閙ent que la brigandine, qui 閠oit de fer plein ou en

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • The same day that part of the host came to the sayd place, the reuerend lord great master ordeined a great brigandine to send into the West, to certifie our holy father the pope, and the Christian princes how the Turks army was afore Rhodes.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Against him that bendeth let the archer bend his bow, and against him that lifteth himself up in his brigandine: and spare ye not her young men; destroy ye utterly all her host.

    Jeremiah 51.

  • Her clothing was patently that of a fighting mercenary; plain brown leathers and brigandine armor.

    Oathblood

  • He still dressed, by preference, in the same boiled-leather armor and homespun he'd always worn, though he could more than afford the kind of expensive riveted brigandine and doeskin Idra and Tarma had chosen.

    Oathbreaker

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