Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A light, late medieval helmet with a brim flaring in the back, sometimes fitted with a visor.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A type of light spherical helmet, also sometimes called a salade or celate.
  • n. Archaic form of salad.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A light kind of helmet, with or without a visor, introduced during the 15th century.
  • n. Salad.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of salad.
  • n. A kind of helmet, first introduced at the beginning of the fifteenth century, lighter than the helm, and having an intermediary form between this and the chapel-de-fer.
  • n. As much as a sallet will hold.
  • n. Lettuce, Lactuca sativa.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a light medieval helmet with a slit for vision

Etymologies

Middle English salet, from Old French sallade, from Old Spanish celada or Old Italian celata, both probably from Latin caelāta (cassis), engraved (helmet), feminine past participle of caelāre, to engrave, from caelum, chisel.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French salade, from Spanish celada, thought to be from Latin caelāta ("ornamentally engraved (helmet)") (although the Latin word is not attested in this sense). (Wiktionary)
Alternative forms. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And, I think, this word sallet was born to do me good: for, many a time, but for a sallet, my brain-pan had been cleft with a brown bill; and, many a time, when I have been dry, and bravely marching, it hath served me instead of a quart-pot to drink in; and now the word sallet must serve me to feed on.

    Highways & Byways in Sussex

  • For starters, we'll have a "sallet" -- salad -- from Margaret Huntington Hooker's 1896 book, "Early American Cookery," reprinted in 1981 by Americana Review.

    post-gazette.com - News

  • III. -- and find at their place of supper nothing but a 'sallet' and two or three bones of mutton provided for ten of us, 'which was very strange.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Volume 1

  • And I think this word 'sallet' was born to do me good: for many a time, but for a sallet, my brainpan had been cleft with a brown bill; and many a time, when I have been dry and bravely marching, it hath served me instead of a quart pot to drink in; and now the word 'sallet' must serve me to feed on.

    The Second Part of King Henry VI

  • I realized that maybe once a week for breakfast or lunch I eat a poke sallet-like dish — a kind of spinach frittata that is more spinach than egg.

    Polk Poke Salad Sallet | clusterflock

  • “The Allens” line of canned vegetables still included canned ‘poke sallet greens’ till just a few years ago.

    Polk Poke Salad Sallet | clusterflock

  • Next, notice the helmet, the Duc d'Alencon specifically remarks that her helmet he calls it a calotte a sallet had no visor.

    Archive 2008-02-24

  • The typical later 15th-centuy (Wars of the Roses era) knightly headwear is the sallet and bevor combo.

    Long Tall Sallet

  • I do look now for a Spanish fig, or an Italian sallet, daily.

    The White Devil

  • Then they sat silent all four; and thereafter Birdalone arose and did off her sallet, and kissed and embraced Gerard and his sons, and bade them farewell, and she and the young men wept.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • This bugged me for a while until I found the word I was thinking of instead: solleret. (Not related, really, except that they're both medieval armor-type thingies.)

    August 1, 2009