Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Brilliance, as of intellect or artistic performance.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a shining quality; brilliance.
  • n. An act of being brilliant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a quality that outshines the usual

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It occurred to Wyllard that Gregory had, at least, made no great success of farming; but that occupation, as practised on the prairie, demands a good deal more than quickness and what some call brilliancy from the man who undertakes it.

    Hawtrey's Deputy

  • It occurred to Wyllard that Gregory had, at least, made no great success of farming; but that occupation, as practiced on the prairie, demands a great deal more than quickness and what some call brilliancy from the man who undertakes it.

    Masters of the Wheat-Lands

  • The heather on the hill came in deep russet tones of glory defeated, and the withered bracken with tints of gold, all gaining a double brilliancy from the liquid medium that returned their image.

    Kirsteen: The Story of a Scotch Family Seventy Years Ago

  • But while most of the foliage is gaining in brilliancy, bare limbs are already seen here and there; the Virginia creepers are all but leafless, so are the black walnuts; and the balm of Gilead poplar is losing its large leaves.

    Rural Hours

  • On the following Sunday, the sun himself scarcely exceeded in brilliancy the flashing Weathercock, which hovered gently between point and point on the old church-tower by the sea, as if to exhibit his splendour to the world.

    Parables From Nature

  • The official entry surpassed in brilliancy even the istikbāl of Tabreez: the same crowd, rush and crush; the same coffee, tea, and kalleeons; the meerzas, the merchants, the beggars, the lootees.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Cleves would exonerate him from all pecuniary hardships, his very deficiency in brilliancy of parts, and knowledge of mankind, which though differently modified, was equal to that of Sir Hugh himself, would obviate regret of more cultivated society, and facilitate their reciprocal satisfaction.

    Camilla: or, A Picture of Youth

  • a son of Dr. Anderson, and several other young men have carried the art to very great perfection; their performances rival in brilliancy and spirit the finest productions on copper.

    Letter 16

  • To measure its attractions one must recall the brilliancy and eloquence of Diderot; the wit, the taste, the learning, the courtly accomplishments of Grimm; the gaiety and originality of d'Holbach, who had "read everything and forgotten nothing interesting;" the sparkling conversation of the most finished and scholarly diplomats in Europe, many of whom we have already met at the dinners of Mme. Geoffrin.

    The Women of the French Salons

  • It shows well for the simplicity and effectiveness of the perfected burners that Mr. Grimston's experimental example, although necessarily imperfect In many ways, burns with a remarkably steady light, of great brilliancy, which is assured by the fact that the products of combustion are robbed of all their heat to magnify the useful effect, so that the hand may be borne with ease over the outlet of the chimney.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882

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  • "A spectacular and beautiful game of chess, generally featuring sacrificial attacks and unexpected moves." Used in a sentence: "Fischer's achievements are legendary. At 13, he won a brilliancy that became known as the Game of the Century." from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_fischer)

    July 7, 2009