Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A stopper especially for the hole through which a cask, keg, or barrel is filled or emptied.
  • n. A bunghole.
  • transitive v. To close with or as if with a cork or stopper.
  • transitive v. Informal To injure or damage: fell on skis and bunged up my leg.
  • transitive v. Chiefly British To fling; toss: "The Hungarian director bungs star Klaus Maria Brandauer once more into the breaches of past Teuton history” ( Nigel Andrews).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A stopper, alternative to a cork, often made of rubber used to prevent fluid passing through the neck of a bottle, vat, a hole in a vessel etc.
  • n. A cecum or anus, especially of a slaughter animal.
  • n. A bribe.
  • v. To plug, as with a bung.
  • v. To put somewhere without care; chuck.
  • v. To batter, bruise; to cause to bulge or swell.
  • v. To pass a bribe.
  • adj. Broken, not in working order.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The large stopper of the orifice in the bilge of a cask.
  • n. The orifice in the bilge of a cask through which it is filled; bunghole.
  • n. A sharper or pickpocket.
  • transitive v. To stop, as the orifice in the bilge of a cask, with a bung; to close; -- with up.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A large cork or stopper for closing the hole in the side of a cask through which it is filled.
  • n. The hole or orifice in a cask through which it is filled; a bung-hole.
  • n. A pickpocket; a sharper.
  • n. A brewer.
  • n. A pile of seggars or setters in a porcelain-kiln.
  • To stop the orifice of with a bung; close.
  • To beat severely; exhaust by hard blows or strenuous effort; bruise; maul: used chiefly in the phrase bunged up: as, he was all bunged up in the fight; the day's work has completely bunged me up.
  • Dead.
  • To fail; go to smash; collapse; become bankrupt: as, the bank has gone bung.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. close with a cork or stopper
  • v. give a tip or gratuity to in return for a service, beyond the compensation agreed on
  • n. a plug used to close a hole in a barrel or flask

Etymologies

Middle English bunge, from Middle Dutch bonge, from Late Latin pūncta, hole, from Latin, feminine past participle of pungere, to prick.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Medieval Dutch bonge, bonne or bonghe ("stopper"), or perhaps from French bonde, which may itself be either of Germanic origin, or from Celtic *bunda - either way probably from puncta ("hole"), the feminine singular form of Latin punctus, perfect passive participle of pungō ("pierce into, prick"). (Wiktionary)
From Yagara bang ("dead"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • "This American Life producer, Ben Calhoun, got a hot tip about a farmer, who is in charge of 'a pork producing operation that spans several states.' This farmer has was visiting a pork processing plant one day in Oklahoma, and noticed boxes stacked on the floor labeled 'artificial calamari.' Asked what that meant, the plant’s manager replied, 'Bung. It’s hog rectum.' For clarity, Calhoun adds, 'Rectum that would be sliced into rings, deep fried, and boom, there you have it.'”
    - Eric Steinman, Is it Calamari or Pig Bung?, care2.com, 16 Jan 2013.

    January 18, 2013

  • Also a stopper, alternative to a cork, often made of rubber used to prevent fluid passing through the neck of a bottle, a hole in a vessel etc.

    August 22, 2009