Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Capable of igniting and burning.
  • adj. Easily aroused or excited.
  • n. A substance that ignites and burns readily.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Capable of burning
  • n. A material that is capable of burning.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Capable of taking fire and burning; apt to catch fire; inflammable.
  • adj. Easily kindled or excited; quick; fiery; irascible.
  • n. A substance that may be set on fire, or which is liable to take fire and burn.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Capable of taking fire and burning; capable of undergoing combustion: as, wood and coal are combustible.
  • Hence Easily excited; fiery; irascible; inflammable: said of persons.
  • n. A substance that will take fire and burn: as, wood and coal are combustibles; the building was full of combustibles. See combustion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a substance that can be burned to provide heat or power
  • adj. capable of igniting and burning

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As used in steam engineering practice, however, the term combustible is applied to that portion of the fuel which is dry and free from ash, thus including both oxygen and nitrogen which may be constituents of the fuel, though not in the true sense of the term combustible.

    Steam, Its Generation and Use

  • Barkey pointed out that since the 1990s, young Kurds have spread across Turkey, including to shantytowns on the outskirts of Istanbul, where they represent what he calls a combustible addition to the country's fragile ethnic mix, which includes disaffected Turkish youth under the sway of ultra-nationalists.

    Turks Hope For Lasting Cease-Fire With Kurds

  • Jerry Lee Lewis, a pianist Isacoff classifies as a 'combustible,' performs at the Rainbow in London in 1972.

    News

  • It has long been known as a combustible substance, but it is within these few years only that the product of its combustion has been proved to be pure carbonic acid.

    Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2 In Which the Elements of that Science Are Familiarly Explained and Illustrated by Experiments

  • Also, he says that what the fire department calls combustible weeds were actually fire-resistant, native California plants.

    AroundTheCapitol.com

  • Since that time, OSHA has conducted inspections at many of these facilities, of which 80\% were, in fact, identified as a combustible dust hazard, according to a recent article published by the Combustible Dust Policy Institute.

    PRWeb

  • By making our communities self-sustainable with clean energy such as solar, wind, geothermal, and magnetic - forever replacing the obsolete 80-year long enterprise known as the combustible engine -, we make ourselves and our families less dependent on the broken state-enterprise apparatus.

    Dissident Voice

  • In order that carbon might serve as the solid substratum of all organized beings, it was necessary that it should be made unalterable by the air within the limits of terrestialtemperature, but at the same time the economy of nature required that it should be made combustible, that is, endowed with strong affinities for oxygen; yet these affinities have been so carefully regulated, that they are called into play only at a high temperature, and are thus placed entirely under the control of man.

    Religion and Chemistry

  • It consists of a small wooden cylinder, about three quarters of an inch in diameter, and 3 in. long; at one end of the cylinder is a cavity which holds the combustible, which is confined only by pasteboard or membrane, so that, when ignited, it will blow straight into the heart of the principal charge; the two wires of the electric circuit, entering at the other end of the cylinder, terminate upon the little wooden disc which forms the bottom of this cavity, so that the end of one wire is about a quarter of an inch from the other; the electric circuit is completed by drawing a dash with a blacklead-pencil across the tiny space of the wooden surface connecting the two ends of wire; and the fusee is then charged.

    Experiments with the American Torpedo-Shells at Chatham

  • Pacino returned to the kind of combustible, high-intensity role that had made him famous.

    Five People Born on April 25 | myFiveBest

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