Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To destroy a metal or alloy gradually, especially by oxidation or chemical action: acid corroding metal.
  • transitive v. To impair steadily; deteriorate: "Doubt and mistrust could creep into our lives, corroding personal and professional relationships” ( Philip Taubman).
  • intransitive v. To be eaten or worn away.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To eat away by degrees; to wear away or diminish by gradually separating or destroying small particles of, as by action of a strong acid or a caustic alkali.
  • v. To consume; to wear away; to prey upon; to impair.
  • v. To have corrosive action; to be subject to corrosion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To eat away by degrees; to wear away or diminish by gradually separating or destroying small particles of, as by action of a strong acid or a caustic alkali.
  • transitive v. To consume; to wear away; to prey upon; to impair.
  • intransitive v. To have corrosive action; to be subject to corrosion.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Literally, to eat or gnaw away gradually; hence, to wear away, diminish, or disintegrate (a body) by gradually separating small particles from (it), especially by the action of a chemical agent: as, nitric acid corrodes copper: often used figuratively.
  • Synonyms To canker, gnaw, waste.
  • To gnaw; eat or wear away gradually.
  • Figuratively, to become gradually impaired or deteriorated; waste away.
  • To act by or as if by corrosion or canker, or a process of eating or wearing away.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. become destroyed by water, air, or a corrosive such as an acid
  • v. cause to deteriorate due to the action of water, air, or an acid

Etymologies

Middle English corroden, from Latin corrōdere, to gnaw away : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + rōdere, to gnaw; see rēd- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Latin corrodere ("to gnaw"), via the French corroder. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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