Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly British A zucchini.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small marrow (UK)/squash (US).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a marrow squash plant whose fruit are eaten when small; -- called also zucchini.
  • n. a small cucumber-shaped vegetable marrow; typically dark green; -- called also zucchini.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. small cucumber-shaped vegetable marrow; typically dark green
  • n. marrow squash plant whose fruit are eaten when small

Etymologies

French dialectal, diminutive of courge, gourd, from Old French cohourde, from Latin cucurbita.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Borrowing from French courgette, diminutive of courge ("vegetable marrow, marrow squash"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Of course, but it's funny because they're typically trying to imitate an accent that has all but disappeared from common use (received pronunciation or BBC English), rather than simply doing a bad job of it.

    Am I alone in finding Hugh Lawrie's pseudo-American accent on "House" rather strange to listen to?

    July 4, 2008

  • I agree with chained_bear -- it's wonderful to hear people with British accents try to pronounce an American R. I once heard a guy on the BBC try to do a George Bush impression, and boy, that was downright hilarious.

    And how about the opposite situation? When an American tries to do a British accent, is it amusing to British ears?

    July 4, 2008

  • That's an hilarious, Asativum.

    July 4, 2008

  • There's an hairy guy named Herb just down the street. He's an hoot.

    July 3, 2008

  • I say "an urrb." I don't really do that crazy RRRRR thing. But I love to hear people with British accents try to do an American R. It always makes me laugh till I cry. :) Especially the word "dork."

    July 3, 2008

  • How about "an harmonica"? ;->

    July 3, 2008

  • But do you pronounce it "anurrrrrb"?

    July 3, 2008

  • An herb sounds ugly to me, like a fake Cockney affectation. Gives me an hissy fit.

    July 3, 2008

  • Yes, I say "an herb." I do NOT say "an historian."

    July 3, 2008

  • Yes, but I'm half-Brit and grew up there. Canada seems to be split on this as on other Brit / Yank linguistic divides. Some people drop the h, but I think a majority pronounce it.

    July 3, 2008

  • Hey yarb, aren't you in Vancouver? I thought they pronounced it "erb" in Canada, just like we do in the States.

    July 3, 2008

  • In the UK we just call the seeds "coriander seeds"...

    I notice you say "an herb" - does this mean that you pronounce it "urrrrrb"? I LOVE that.

    July 3, 2008

  • Coriander in the U.S. is actually a spice (not an herb) from the seeds of the cilantro plant. The herb (leaves) is cilantro.

    That's odd, though, yarb. I know scallions are called spring onions, because that's the phrase I grew up with. I only learned they were called scallions or green onions later on.

    July 3, 2008

  • Here corgi, corgi.

    July 3, 2008

  • I had blank looks asking for spring onions (scallions or green onions) and coriander (cilantro) soon after leaving the UK.

    *Imagining dontcry stalking young female corgis*.

    July 2, 2008

  • Yeah, I had a similar experience using an Australian cookbook that calls for capsicum. But I figured it out pretty quick.

    July 2, 2008

  • I remember when I first was reading a cookbook from England and the recipe called for courgettes. The only thing I could come up with, in my mind, were the dogs those royal people keep around all the time! Still makes me laugh -- 'cause it was a vegetarian cookbook!

    July 1, 2008

  • And they're both vegetables!

    Itsy-bitsy teeny-weeny
    don't forget courgette's zucchini

    July 1, 2008

  • Hey! It's a mnemonic device! Eggplant and Elton John both begin with E!!!

    *very excited about this*

    July 1, 2008

  • Zucchini. But I only know that because of the recent conversation on eggplant, and because Elton John is still playing in my head.

    "Goodbye aubergine, though I never knew you at all..."

    July 1, 2008

  • Alright ptero, what is it? No WordNET cheating now!

    June 30, 2008