Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Used as a stage direction to indicate that two or more performers leave the stage.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A stage direction for more than one actor to leave the stage.
  • v. they leave the stage (a stage direction to two or more actors, the plural counterpart of exit)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • They go out, or retire from the scene. See 1st exit.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. They go out: a word used in the text of plays to denote that point in the action at which two or more actors leave the stage.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin, third person pl. of exīre, to go out; see exit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

from Latin exeunt ("they leave"), the third-person plural present active indicative of exeō ("leave").

Examples

Comments

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  • At the least, those illuminated emergency signs in theatres should have this instead of EXIT.

    January 12, 2013

  • it was used to best advantage as a stage direction in Sir Horace Walpole's "The Mysterious Mother": exeunt severally

    April 13, 2009

  • I like the word, but the spelling always makes me think of fleur-de-lis.

    January 25, 2008

  • Right, A.

    January 24, 2008

  • You can stick to exit; I'm afraid we must use exeunt -- isn't it the plural?

    January 24, 2008

  • Let's just stick to exit, shall we?

    January 24, 2008

  • Well, none of us seem to be using it, koldewyse, so...go ahead. You can use it. I think it's still working. ;-)

    January 24, 2008

  • Is this still usable? Or is it archaic?

    January 24, 2008