Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Finely chopped fish, usually whitefish, pike, or carp, mixed with crumbs, eggs, and seasonings, cooked in a broth in the form of balls or oval-shaped cakes, and usually served chilled.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dish of stuffed fish, or of fish cakes in broth.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. well-seasoned balls of ground fish and eggs and crushed crumbs simmered in fish stock

Etymologies

Yiddish : gefilt, past participle of filn, to fill, stuff + fish, fish.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Yiddish געפֿילטע־פֿיש (gefilte fish, "stuffed fish"), from געפֿילט (gefilt, "stuffed"), from German gefüllter ("stuffed") + Fisch ("fish"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Even though Bubbe Mary was a rogue capitalist, she dropped every spare dime and quarter into a blue and white tin charity box that she kept in her pantry, right next to the jars of gefilte fish and red beet horseradish.

    Roseanne Archy

Comments

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  • Gefilte fish (Yiddish: געפֿילטע פֿיש) are poached fish patties or balls made from a mixture of ground deboned fish, mostly carp (common carp). They are popular in the Ashkenazi Jewish community.
    In traditional recipes for gefilte fish, the fish is first deboned, often while still at the market. Next, the fish is ground together with eggs, onions and flour, matzoh meal or challah, and then stuffed into the skin of the deboned fish, giving it the name gefilte (filled or stuffed, compare the German gefüllte). The whole stuffed fish is then poached with carrots and onions. When prepared this way, it is usually served in slices. This form of preparation eliminated the need for picking fish bones at the table and stretched the fish further, so that even poor families could enjoy fish on the Sabbath.

    _Wikipedia

    February 3, 2008