Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Ice hockey.
  • n. Field hockey.
  • n. Street hockey.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Ice hockey, a game on ice in which two teams of six players skate and try to score by shooting a puck into the opposing team's net, using their sticks.
  • n. Field hockey, a team sport played on a pitch on solid ground where players have to hit a ball into a net using a hockey stick.
  • n. A variation of hockey, such as roller hockey, street hockey, or shinny.
  • n. Variation of oche.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A game in which two parties of players, armed with sticks curved or hooked at the end, attempt to drive any small object (as a ball or a bit of wood) toward opposite goals.
  • n. The stick used by the players.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A game of ball played with a club curved at one end. Also called shinny, shinty.
  • n. The stick or club used in playing this game. Also called hockey-stick, hockey-club.
  • n. Harvest-home; the harvest-supper.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a game resembling ice hockey that is played on an open field; two opposing teams use curved sticks try to drive a ball into the opponents' net
  • n. a game played on an ice rink by two opposing teams of six skaters each who try to knock a flat round puck into the opponents' goal with angled sticks

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Unknown origin, 16th century, possibly related to hook due to the curvature of the stick. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I'm relieved to see that hockey resembles ice hockey.

    September 29, 2008

  • "Drunk with strong stale beer, called old hock."
    - Francis Grose, 'The Vulgar Tongue'.

    September 8, 2008