Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Impossible to see; not visible: Air is invisible.
  • adj. Not accessible to view; hidden: mountain peaks invisible in the fog.
  • adj. Not easily noticed or detected; inconspicuous: "The poor are politically invisible” ( Michael Harrington).
  • adj. Not published in financial statements: an invisible asset.
  • n. One that is invisible.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Unable to be seen; not visible.
  • adj. Apparently, but not actually, offline.
  • adj. That is ignored by a person.
  • n. An invisible person or thing; specifically, God, the Supreme Being.
  • n. A Rosicrucian; so called because avoiding declaration of his craft.
  • n. One of those (as in the 16th century) who denied the visibility of the church.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Incapable of being seen; not perceptible by vision; not visible.
  • adj. Not visible due to an inherent property, such as lack of color;
  • adj. hidden from view; out of sight
  • adj. Not perceptible due to lack of light
  • adj. Too small or too distant to be perceived.
  • adj. Hidden from the public.
  • adj. imperceptible to the mind.
  • n. An invisible person or thing; specifically, God, the Supreme Being.
  • n. A Rosicrucian; -- so called because avoiding declaration of his craft.
  • n. One of those (as in the 16th century) who denied the visibility of the church.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not visible; incapable of being seen; imperceptible by the sight.
  • Out of sight; concealed or withdrawn from view: as, he keeps himself invisible.
  • n. A Rosicrucian: so called because of the secret character of the organization.
  • n. One who rejects or denies the visible character or external organization of the church; specifically [capitalized], a name given to certain German Protestants because they maintained that the church of Christ might be, and sometimes had been, invisible.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. not prominent or readily noticeable
  • adj. impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The _invisible_ life on this planet is unquestionably far greater than the _visible_ but both visible and invisible doubtless belong to the planet earth.

    Cosmic Consciousness

  • Warren Samuels, a professor at Michigan University who died in August, set about investigating what the originator of the term invisible hand, the influential 18th-century economic thinker Adam Smith, meant by the term and examine how it is applied.

    The Guardian World News

  • He described how current offshoots like al-Awlaki's al-Qaedaof the Arabian Peninsula in Yemen are cooperating with militants in Somalia, describing what he called an "invisible bridge" between the two.

    Special ops chief warns of al-Qaeda 2.0

  • The atomic gear fits nicely with the thrust of Sanborn's oeuvre, which centers on what he calls invisible forces.

    Wired Top Stories

  • In such an environment with such a strong spirit of times – which I call the invisible prison – there is no critical gravitation when it comes to such results.

    Archive 2008-04-19

  • Not wanting to disappoint what he calls his invisible audience.

    CNN Transcript Oct 20, 2008

  • Even in private, he played the role of his most envied characters, not wanting to disappoint what he calls his invisible audience.

    CNN Transcript Oct 18, 2008

  • Even in private, he played the role of his most envied character, not wanting to disappoint what he calls his invisible audience.

    CNN Transcript Oct 18, 2008

  • It only happened a few times, but pilots reported hitting what they referred to as an invisible wall when they were a specific number of nautical miles out into the strait.

    State of the Union

  • They are what we call invisible rays; and not until the temperature of the wire has reached nearly 1,000°

    Fragments of science, V. 1-2

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