Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view: a desert landscape.
  • n. A picture depicting an expanse of scenery.
  • n. The branch of art dealing with the representation of natural scenery.
  • n. The aspect of the land characteristic of a particular region: a bleak New England winter landscape.
  • n. Grounds that have been landscaped: liked the house especially for its landscape.
  • n. An extensive mental view; an interior prospect: "They occupy the whole landscape of my thought” ( James Thurber).
  • adj. Of or relating to a landscape or landscapes: landscape painting.
  • adj. Of or relating to landscaping: a nursery offering landscape services.
  • adj. Of or relating to the orientation of a page such that the shorter side runs from top to bottom: printed the document in landscape mode in order to accommodate the wide columns of a table.
  • transitive v. To adorn or improve (a section of ground) by contouring and by planting flowers, shrubs, or trees.
  • intransitive v. To arrange grounds artistically as a profession.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A portion of land or territory which the eye can comprehend in a single view, including all the objects it contains.
  • n. A picture representing a scene by land or sea, actual or fancied, the chief subject being the general aspect of nature, as fields, hills, forests, water. etc.
  • n. The pictorial aspect of a country.
  • n. a mode of printing where the horizontal sides are longer than the vertical sides
  • n. A space, indoor or outdoor and natural or man-made (as in "designed landscape")
  • n. a situation that is presented, a scenario
  • v. Create or maintain a landscape.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A portion of land or territory which the eye can comprehend in a single view, including all the objects it contains.
  • n. A picture representing a scene by land or sea, actual or fancied, the chief subject being the general aspect of nature, as fields, hills, forests, water. etc. Compare seascape.
  • n. The pictorial aspect of a country.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A view or prospect of rural scenery, more or less extensive, such as is comprehended within the scope or range of vision from a single point of view. See also landskip.
  • n. A picture representing a view or prospect of rural or natural inland scenery as it appears within the range of vision from a single point of view; also, such pictures collectively, as distinguished especially from marine and architectural pictures and from portraits.
  • n. A compendious view or manifestation; an epitome; a compend. (Compare quotation from Bishop Hacket under landskip.)
  • n. Synonyms Prospect, Scene, etc. See view, n.
  • To represent or delineate in landscape.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a genre of art dealing with the depiction of natural scenery
  • n. an extensive mental viewpoint
  • n. painting depicting an expanse of natural scenery
  • v. do landscape gardening
  • n. an expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view
  • v. embellish with plants

Etymologies

Dutch landschap, from Middle Dutch landscap, region : land, land; + -scap, state, condition (collective suff.).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From an alteration (due to Dutch landschap) of earlier landskip, lantschip, from Middle English *landschippe, *landschapp, from Old English landscipe, landsceap ("region, district, tract of land"), equivalent to land +‎ -ship; in some senses from Dutch landschap ("region, district, province, landscape"), from Middle Dutch landscap, lantscap ("region"), from Old Dutch *landskepi, *landskapi (“region”). Cognate with Scots landskape, landskep, landskip ("landscape"), West Frisian lânskip ("landscape"), Low German landschop ("landscape, district"), German Landschaft ("landscape, countryside, scenery"), Swedish landskap ("landscape, scenery, province"), Icelandic landskapur ("countryside"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Some might call it a green belt, or use the term "landscape urbanism."

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • That's the name landscape painter Frederic Edwin Church gave to the Persian-style pile he built in Hudson, New York, after visiting Damascus, Jerusalem and Beirut.

    BusinessWeek.com -- Top News

  • A part of the landscape is an interesting phenomenon; in amongst the endless fields, you will find the occasional lonely hill, rising abruptly from the earth and coming to a broad flat top ... utterly alien in that flat land, and upon reflection, very hard to explain.

    Archive 2010-04-01

  • For most Timorese, the landscape is also populated by powerful spirits who are called rai na'in, literally meaning owners of the land.

    Global Voices in English » East Timor: The land was freed, but who owns it?

  • The masterplan for 2012, headed by Jason Prior, landscape architect and managing director of Edaw, clearly started with the proposition that this landscape is the context within which the huge variety of Olympic developments will take shape - the transport infrastructure, stadiums, housing.

    Prunings XXI

  • Now this landscape is a stage removed, half-blurred by dreams, its shades and shapes encroach on our security.

    Archive 2005-12-01

  • "I've fished a lot of places, but this might be the only one where the landscape is as interesting as the fishing," he said.

    Trout Fishing in the Desert of Marble Canyon

  • As I said, the landscape is absolutely magnificent.

    Romania—The Bright Future and Present Problems

  • During the delivery of one of his lectures, in which he calls landscape painters the topographers of art, Beechey admonished Turner with his elbow of the severity of the sarcasm; presently, when Fuseli described the patrons of portrait painting as men who would give a few guineas to have their own senseless heads painted, and then assume the air and use the language of patrons, Turner administered a similar hint to Beechey.

    Anecdotes of Painters, Engravers, Sculptors and Architects, and Curiosities of Art, (Vol. 2 of 3)

  • The entire landscape is melting into a totally smooth ice rink.

    Archive 2009-02-01

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