Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You must have seen the mustard in the shop windows: it is a thick conserve of fruits, flavored with mustard; and the mandorlato is a candy made of honey, and filled with almonds.

    Venetian Life

  • Well, they buy fish, as many as they will, and a vase of mustard, and a box of mandorlato, and make presents of them, one family to another, the day before Christmas.

    Venetian Life

  • It is not too much for a rich family to present a hundred boxes of mandorlato and as many pots of mustard.

    Venetian Life

  • More than half the campo was paved with crockery from Rovigo and glass-ware from Murano; clothing of every sort, and all kinds of small household wares, were offered for sale; and among the other booths, in the proportion of two to one, were stalls of the inevitable Christmas mustard and mandorlato.

    Venetian Life

  • A simple rectilinear coffin, of smooth Verona _mandorlato_, raised on four thick columns, and closed by a heavy cippus-cover.

    New Italian sketches

  • If the _mandorlato_ gives a smile to those majestic Lombard buildings, the terra-cotta decorations add the element of life and movement.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • It took the name of _mandorlato_, I suppose, from a resemblance to almond blossoms.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • The polish, lastly, which it takes, makes the _mandorlato_ shine like a smile upon the sober face of the brickwork: for, serviceable as terra-cotta is for nearly all artistic purposes, it cannot reflect light or gain the illumination which comes from surface brightness.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • They called to their aid the _mandorlato_ of Verona, supporting their porch pillars on the backs of couchant lions, inserting polished slabs on their fa├žades, and building huge sarcophagi into their cloister alleys.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • To their quarries of _mandorlato_ the Veronese builders owed the peach-bloom colours of their columned aisles.

    Renaissance in Italy Volume 3 The Fine Arts

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • marble with almond shaped patches of color

    January 4, 2013