Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of recent origin; modern.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Modern, new-fangled.
  • adj. New; recent.
  • n. A modern author (especially as opposed to a classical writer).
  • n. Someone with new or modern ideas.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Recent in origin; modern; new.
  • n. One of modern times; a modern.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • New; recent in origin; modern.
  • n. A modern.

Etymologies

Late Latin neōtericus, from Greek neōterikos, from neōteros, younger, comparative of neos, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Late Latin neotericus, from Hellenistic Greek νεωτερικός, from comparative of Ancient Greek νέος ("new"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In point of fact, the clash between outmoded newsgathering and neoteric tech-wizardry is a long time coming.

    Rob Fishman: Old Dogs, New Media: Why J-School Apps Are Up

  • Gaiman explores the vast and bloody landscape of myths and legends where the gods of yore and the neoteric gods of now conflict in modern-day America ....

    American Gods: Summary and book reviews of American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

  • Considering the manhours dedicated to practicing, I think it's an absolute bargain given that neoteric (and often times, mediocre) music sell for $15 and up (in fine department stores across the country, no doubt).

    Paranoid Pedestrian Ponderings

  • Its very shape was changing, twisting and buckling with neoteric forces it did not understand.

    A Triumph of Souls

  • The Aeneid has none of the meretricious involutions of plot, none of the puzzling half-uttered allusions to essential facts, none of the teasing interruptions of the neoteric story book.

    Vergil

  • It is not, as has been held, a result of rhetorical studies alone; it reveals rather a native good sense tempered with a neoteric interest in psychology and a neoteric exactness in formal composition.

    Vergil

  • That “shepherd” at least is an actual person, a friend of Cinna, and a member of the neoteric group; that indeed it is Cornificius is exceedingly probable.

    Vergil

  • In a word, it was Catullus and Calvus, the lyric poets, who made it possible for the next generation to reject Catullus and Calvus the neoteric romancers.

    Vergil

  • His action, when all is said and done, was merely typical of that "every man for himself, and the devil take the hindmost" attitude assumed by latter-day neoteric Government institutions.

    Experiences of a Dug-out, 1914-1918

  • I suppose, is in the neoteric fashion of spending a honeymoon on a railway: apt image, exposition and perpetuation of the state of mania conducting to the institution!

    Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith

Comments

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  • I just noticed that the edit distance between this word and neotenic is absurdly small.

    March 1, 2008

  • "Of recent origin, modern".

    February 29, 2008

  • "It was an update. The guards listened in shock.
    Apparently there were troubling new developments which could not be shared on-air, but the camerlengo had decided to break tradition and enter conclave to address the cardinals. Never before in history had this been done. Then again, Chartrand realized, never before in history had the Vatican been sitting on what amounted to some sort of neoteric nuclear warhead."
    - 'Angels and Demons', Dan Brown.

    February 28, 2008