Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An implement consisting of a wooden shaft with a metal point and a hinged hook near the end, used to handle logs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of peavy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A cant hook having the end of its lever armed with a spike; it is used for handling logs.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A lumberman's cant-hook having a strong spike at the end.
  • n. A stout lever from 5 to 7 feet long, fitted at the larger end with a metal socket and pike, and a curved steel hook which works on a bolt: used in handling logs, especially in driving. A peavey differs from a cant-hook in having a pike instead of a toe-ring and lip at the end.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a stout lever with a sharp spike; used for handling logs

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

After Joseph Peavey (fl. 1875), American inventor.

Examples

Comments

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  • Since lumberjacks don't often mingle
    They tend to be lonely and single.
    When not plying the peavey
    They watch porn on TV
    And polish the trusty swing-dingle.

    December 13, 2014

  • PV

    June 3, 2011

  • It's hard to visualize these tools without photos.

    June 2, 2011

  • A peavey is as different from a pulaski as water is from fire. One wonders if the former tool was named after a person, as the latter was.

    June 2, 2011

  • A lumberman's cant-hook having a strong spike at the end.

    A stout lever from 5 to 7 feet long, fitted at the larger end with a metal socket and pike, and a curved steel hook which works on a bolt: used in handling logs, especially in driving. A peavey differs from a cant-hook in having a pike instead of a toe-ring and lip at the end.

    June 2, 2011