Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Irish Black magic; sorcery.
  • n. Irish An evil spell; an incantation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. magic, witchcraft; a spell, especially one designed to cause or cure illnesses to man or beast, or to increase or decrease the quantities of farm products such as butter or milk.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Witchcraft; incantation; charm.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Irish Gaelic píseog, from Middle Irish pisóc, piseóc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Anglo-Irish, from Irish piseog ("witchcraft"), from Middle Irish piseóc, pisóc.

Examples

Comments

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  • The latent thought arises - is that what pish is short for? Capital!

    March 13, 2018

  • The old gent’s a bit of a rogue

    And knows that the occult’s in vogue,

    So ply him with toasts

    And he’ll talk of ghosts,

    Or fairies and such rich pishogue.

    As in all of the supplied usage examples, and contrary to the formal definitions, the word is used dismissively to mean superstitious nonsense.

    March 12, 2018

  • var. pishoge

    July 16, 2009

  • "pishogue, usually plural, also pisherogue, fizoge, etc. Ir. Joyce 302; piseog 'witchcraft, sorcery, superstitious acts.' Incredible story, foolish talk; complaint.

    1968 Dillon 138 Fishogues, pisharogues—superstitions about ghosts, fairies, etc.; matters a person complains about. 'Them are only some of your old fishogues.'"

    Dictionary of Newfoundland English

    January 27, 2009

  • I know this word as a superstition, though Wiktionary defines it as witchcraft or a magic spell.

    December 10, 2007