Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To offer for acceptance; tender. See Synonyms at offer.
  • n. The act of proffering; an offer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship.
  • n. Essay; attempt.
  • v. To offer for acceptance; to propose to give; to make a tender of; as, to proffer a gift; to proffer services; to proffer friendship.
  • v. To essay or attempt of one’s own accord; to undertake, or propose to undertake.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To offer for acceptance; to propose to give; to make a tender of
  • transitive v. To essay or attempt of one's own accord; to undertake, or propose to undertake.
  • n. An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender.
  • n. Essay; attempt.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bring or put forward; hold forth.
  • To hold forth so that a person may take; offer for acceptance: as, to proffer a gift; to proffer services; to proffer friendship.
  • Synonyms To tender, volunteer, propose.
  • To dodge.
  • n. An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another: as, proffers of peace or friendship.
  • n. In law, an offer or endeavor to proceed in an action.
  • n. An essay; an attempt.
  • n. A rabbit-burrow.
  • n. Synonyms Tender, proposal.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. present for acceptance or rejection
  • n. a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection

Etymologies

Middle English profren, from Old French poroffrir, profrir : por-, forth (from Latin prō-; see pro-1) + offrir, to offer (from Latin offerre; see offer).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English proferen, from Old French proferer, from Latin proferre ("to bring forth"), from pro ("forth") + ferre ("to bring"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I think that at the very least Mark Geragos or someone on his team will have to what we call proffer to the judge -- in other words, they'll have to tell the judge really what they're thinking and what's at stake here so that the judge will know this isn't just hype, this isn't just, you know, a spin on the case, that they're really close and what evidence they have to show that.

    CNN Transcript Jun 6, 2003

  • Much of what this book has to proffer is indeed true.

    Review of the Day: Scary

  • Even if they don't, prosecutors likely can get an order to keep him detained through a "proffer" -- providing evidence to the judge that would be offered by witnesses, rather than having to put an FBI agent on the stand, said Daniel C. Richman, a professor at C.lumbia Law School in New York C.ty.

    detnews.com - Local

  • The ground rules, spelled out in a standard agreement called a proffer, explained that the government could still prosecute Birkenfeld, and that at least indirectly it could use his own evidence to build a case against him.

    UBS whistleblower ended up with a prison sentence

  • The two assistants were interviewed by the U.S. attorney's office for the Southern District of New York through what are called proffer agreements, in which prosecutors agree not to use their statements against them as long as they tell the truth, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Madoff Aide Allegedly Got Fake 'Tickets' of Trading

  • Lourie said based upon the proffer that misprison of a felony was the best fit in terms of a plea and that Richard would just have to add a new portion to his proffer, that is, Richard would have to change his statement to the government.

    David Fiderer: Don Siegelman's Prosecutor Lied to Whom? It's Either the Court or Congress

  • “A proffer is an offer into evidence,” said Bryan A.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • He passed whole hours in melancholy silence beside that heartbroken old man, not daring to proffer a word or a caress, he was so afraid that his consolation would seem misplaced or trivial.

    Indiana

  • The sit-down, known as a proffer session, typically signals that adefendant has begun cooperating in a bid for a plea deal.

    ajc.com - News

  • The sit-down, known as a proffer session, typically signals that a defendant has begun cooperating in a bid for a plea deal.

    CBS 4: World News Videos

Comments

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  • Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
    Pronunciation: \ˈprä-fər\
    Function: transitive verb
    Inflected Form(s): prof·fered; prof·fer·ing \-f(ə-)riŋ\
    Etymology: Middle English profren, from Anglo-French profrer, proffrir, porofrir, from por- forth (from Latin pro-) + offrir to offer
    Date: 14th century
    : to present for acceptance

    February 14, 2008

  • April 9, 2007