Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of rebetiko.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • By the early '30s, Keromytis took it pro in Piraeus, ultimately gaining acclaim for his rebetika (acoustic blues) and laïkó (pop music) techniques.

    Phil Ramone and Danielle Evin: Dog Ears Music: Volume 202

  • Later, I'll try to look up this possible theme in rebetika and Sefardi traditions and Arabic language songs, too--all great poetry.

    Songs of Disrobing and Exploration (youTube Homework Helper)

  • "Smyrna endures today," his narrator, Cal Stephanides, tells us, "in a few rebetika songs and a stanza from The Waste Land."

    The Gender Blender

  • He entertained an ephemeral image of himself, liberated from his grotesque folds of lard, singing bawdy rebetika in the brothels of Athens, swigging kokkinelli and charming the young girls.

    Captain Corelli's Mandolin

  • Smyrna endures today in a few rebetika songs and a stanza from The Waste Land:

    Middlesex

  • For her, the song conjured only the disreputable bars her brother went to down in the city, those hash dens where they played rebetika and American music and where there were loose women who sang .

    Middlesex

  • Where there was rebetika music there was always hashish.

    Middlesex

  • There was no gambling, no potted palms, but there was rebetika and, on many nights, hashish.

    Middlesex

  • At night he listened to his rebetika records in the attic and smoked his hookah pipe.

    Middlesex

  • Stylianos (Stelios) Kazantzides was one of the leading vocalists of late rebetika and laika from 1955 through the 60s and beyond.

    WN.com - Articles related to Turkish PM visits troubled Greece, backs arms cuts

Comments

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  • I spent a happy road-trip through Greece slapping the dash in time to this.

    August 6, 2008

  • For her, the song conjured only the disreputable bars her brother went to down in the city, those hash dens where they played rebetika and American music and where there were loose women who sang....
    --Jeffrey Eugenides, 2002, Middlesex, p. 23

    August 6, 2008