Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Conveying blood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Conveying blood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Receiving and conveying blood; circulatory, as a blood-vessel. The sanguiferous system of the higher animals consists of the heart, arteries, capillaries, and veins. Also sanguiniferous.

Etymologies

Latin sanguis blood + -ferous. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Red flowers were given for disorders of the sanguiferous system; the petals of the red rose, especially, bear the "signature" of the blood, and blood-root, on account of its red juice, was much prescribed for the blood.

    Three Thousand Years of Mental Healing

  • The sanguiferous vessels underwent an extraordinary increase, or, at least, became remarkably evident.

    Cases of Organic Diseases of the Heart

  • The sanguiferous system is increased in capacity; the veins, especially, are swelled with blood; the countenance is high coloured, except in fits of dyspnÅ“a, when it becomes livid; and it is very frequently puffed, or turgid.

    Cases of Organic Diseases of the Heart

  • The former circumstance needs no illustration; since if the stimulus of the blood, or the irritability of the sanguiferous system be increased, and the strength of the patient not diminished, it is plain that the motions must be performed quicker and stronger.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • From all which it must be concluded, that some fluids have passed from the stomach or abdomen, without having gone through the sanguiferous circulation: and as the bladder is supplied with many lymphatics, as described by Dr. Watson, in the Philos.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • The conglomerate glands open their mouths immediately into the sanguiferous vessels, which bring the blood, from whence they absorb their respective fluids, quite up to the gland: but these conglobate glands collect their adapted fluids from very distant membranes, or cysts, by means of mouths furnished with long necks for this purpose; and which are called lacteals, or lymphatics.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • At length all these circumstances are increased; the quantity of pleasure introduced into the system by the increased irritative muscular motions of the whole sanguiferous, and glandular, and absorbent systems, becomes so great, that the organs of sense are more forcibly excited into action by this internal pleasurable sensation, than by the irritation from the stimulus of external objects.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • And from the same cause they are not liable to a sanguiferous menstruation.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • In this last circumstance of the torpor of the sanguiferous system consists inirritative fever; as all the others are rather accidental or concomitant symptoms, and not essential ones; as fewer or more of them may be present, or may exist with a greater or less degree of inactivity.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • The perpetual necessity of the mixture of oxygen gas with the blood in the lungs evinces, that it must act as a stimulus to the sanguiferous system, as the motions of the heart and arteries presently cease, when animals are immersed in airs which possess no oxygen.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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