Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The horizontal member that bears the upright portion of a frame, especially the horizontal member that forms the base of a window.
  • n. Geology An approximately horizontal sheet of igneous rock intruded between older rock beds.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A horizontal slat which forms the base of a window.
  • n. A horizontal, structural member of a building near ground level on a foundation (sense #3) or pilings or lying on the ground in earth-fast construction and bearing the upright portion of a frame. Also spelled cill. Also called a ground plate, groundsill, sole, sole-plate, mudsill. An interrupted-sill fits between posts instead of being below and supporting the posts in timber framing.
  • n. A horizontal layer of igneous rock between older rock beds.
  • n. A young herring.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The timber or stone at the foot of a door; the threshold.
  • n. The timber or stone on which a window frame stands; or, the lowest piece in a window frame.
  • n. The floor of a gallery or passage in a mine.
  • n. A piece of timber across the bottom of a canal lock for the gates to shut against.
  • n. The shaft or thill of a carriage.
  • n. A young herring.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A stone or piece of timber on which a structure rests; a block forming a basis or foundation: as, the sills of a house, of a bridge, of a loom; more specifically, a horizontal piece of timber of the frame of a building, or of wood or stone at the bottom of a framed case, such as that of a door or window; in absolute use, a door-sill. See door-sill, ground-sill, mudsill, port-sill, window-sill.
  • n. In fortification, the inner edge of the bottom or sole of an embrasure. See diagram under embrasure.
  • n. In mining: The floor of a gallery or passage in a mine.
  • n. A term used by miners in the lead districts of the north of England as nearly equivalent to bed or stratum. Thus, the basaltic sheets intercalated in the mountain-limestone are called whin -sills.
  • n. A young herring.
  • n. A variant of sell.
  • n. The thill or shaft of a carriage.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (geology) a flat (usually horizontal) mass of igneous rock between two layers of older sedimentary rock
  • n. structural member consisting of a continuous horizontal timber forming the lowest member of a framework or supporting structure

Etymologies

Middle English sille, from Old English syll, threshold.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English sille, from Old English syll, threshold. Cognate with German Schwelle ( > Danish svelle), Old Norse svill and syll ( > Danish syld, Norwegian syll). (Wiktionary)
Compare sile. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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