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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Middle English sinne, from Old English synn; akin to Old High German sunta sin and probably to Latin sont-, sons guilty, est is -- more at IS

    Julie Daley: The Courage To Sin: What Mary Daly Taught Me About Being A Woman

  • Tack för Larm, Feber, skivtips, och ett alltid ungt och nyfiket sinne.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • Etymology: Middle English sinne, from Old English synn; akin to Old High German sunta sin and probably to Latin sont-, sons guilty, est is — more at IS

    This Is Spot-On « Lean Left

  • God, ought all to be performed purely, and without any blemish of the minde; what otherwise is done, savoureth of sinne.

    The Decameron

  • A woman, so farre stept into yeeres, as shee is, to give such an evill example to younger women, is it not a sinne beyond all sufferance?

    The Decameron

  • Gossip Monna Mita, with whom (when you remained in this life) I knew you to be very familiar: let me intreat you then to tell me, what punishment is inflicted on you there, for that wanton sinne committed heere?

    The Decameron

  • And therefore seeing I must needs sinne in the Law established by my selfe; I tender my submission, as worthy of punishment, or what amends else you please to enjoyne mee.

    The Decameron

  • You cannot then chuse but call to minde, and say within your own soule: Alas, what a sinne have I committed, in being so unmercifull to my Magnifico.

    The Decameron

  • Nor let me lay this blamefull imputation uppon men onely, for offending in many through over lavish desires: because you your selves (gracious Ladies) sinne highly in one, as namely, in coveting to be beautifull.

    The Decameron

  • Who knoweth not, I pray you, that I am as subject to sinne, as any other Woman living in the world?

    The Decameron

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