Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as weather-box.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ‘Like figures on a weather-house,’ I said quietly.

    The Vesuvius Club

  • You expect in such places as these to find the weather-house whence

    Father Goriot

  • Messrs. Bumpus and Crane are arranged on the plan of the man and the woman in the toy called a "weather-house," both on the same wooden arm suspended on a pivot, -- so that when one comes to the door, the other retires backwards, and _vice versâ_.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 22, August, 1859

  • Egad, she seemed to think it necessary, like the man and woman in the weather-house, that one sex should turn forth into the storm, so soon as the other sought a shelter from its peltings:

    The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor Volume I, Number 1

  • You expect in such places as these to find the weather-house whence a Capuchin issues on wet days; you look to find the execrable engravings which spoil your appetite, framed every one in a black varnished frame, with a gilt beading round it; you know the sort of tortoise-shell clock case, inlaid with brass; the green stove, the Argand lamps, covered with oil and dust, have met your eyes before.

    Paras. 1–99

  • My girl and I are like the little figures in the weather-house; when Amy comes out, Alice goes in.

    Alice Sit-By-The-Fire

  • But of the parlour the great attraction for us little girls was the mysterious weather-house on the mantlepiece, from which, if fine weather was to be expected there turned out "a full-dress" lady, or when storms, a gentleman.

    Autobiography and Other Memorials of Mrs. Gilbert, Formerly Ann Taylor

  • The weather-house had two little doors, out of one of which appeared an old woman when it was fine, and out of the other an old man when it was going to be wet.

    Penelope and the Others Story of Five Country Children

  • Dickie's favourite amongst all Nurse's curious possessions was what she called her "weather-house," a building of cardboard covered with some gritty substance which sparkled.

    Penelope and the Others Story of Five Country Children

  • Messrs. Bumpus and Crane are arranged on the plan of the man and the woman in the toy called a "weather-house," both on the same wooden arm suspended on a pivot, -- so that when one comes to the door, the other retires backwards, and vice versa.

    The Professor at the Breakfast-Table

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