Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That which is brewed; as much liquor as is brewed at one time.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When A. came to take in her liquor, she found her tub empty, and from the cow's staggering and staring, so as to betray her intemperance, she easily divined the mode in which her 'browst' had disappeared.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • “I am glad the plottie pleases ye, sir — but I think I kend gay weel how to make it before I saw your honour — Maister Tirl can tell that, for mony a browst of it I hae brewed lang syne for him and the callant Valentine Bulmer.”

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • “I am thinking, Doctor,” said he, “you might have brewed a bitter browst to yourself if I had not come in as I did.”

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • As the browst (or brewing) of the Howff retained, nevertheless, its unrivalled reputation, most of the old customers continued to give it a preference.

    Old Mortality

  • “It was decided in a case before the town bailies of Cupar Angus, when Luckie Simpson's cow had drunk up Luckie Jamieson's browst of ale, while it stood in the door to cool, that there was no damage to pay, because the crummie drank without sitting down; such being the circumstance constituting a Doch an Dorroch, which is a standing drink for which no reckoning is paid.”

    Sir Walter Scott

  • When A. came to take in her liquor, she found the tub empty, and from the cow's staggering and staring, so as to betray her intemperance, she easily divined the mode in which her ` ` browst '' had disappeared.

    The Waverley

  • 'Here's a browst (brewage)!' thought Robert to himself; and, still on the principle of flying at the first of mischief he saw -- the best mode of meeting it, no doubt -- addressed his grandmother at once.

    Robert Falconer

  • Ye breed o 'the baxters, ye loe your neighbour's browst better than your ain batch.

    The Proverbs of Scotland

  • Cupar-Angus, when Luckie Simpson's cow had drunk up Luckie Jamieson's browst of ale while it stood in the door to cool, that there was no damage to pay, because the crummie drank without sitting down; such being the very circumstance constituting DOCH AN DORROCH, which is a standing drink, for which no reckoning is paid.

    Redgauntlet

  • 'You have been good bairns to-night, gentlemen,' said Mrs. Crosbie; 'I am afraid, Summertrees, that the provost has given you a bad browst; you are not used to quit the lee-side of the punch-bowl in such a hurry.

    Redgauntlet

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • It's Angus's dream to be doused

    In the finest distillery's browst,

    To float and submerge

    In gluttonous splurge,

    Emerging quite perfectly soused.

    December 29, 2016