Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An arrangement of five objects with one at each corner of a rectangle or square and one at the center.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An arrangement of five units in a pattern corresponding to the five-spot on dice, playing cards, or dominoes.
  • n. An angle of five-twelfths of a circle, or 150°, between two objects.
  • n. A bronze coin minted during the Roman Republic, valued at five-twelfths of an as.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An arrangement of things by fives in a square or a rectangle, one being placed at each corner and one in the middle; especially, such an arrangement of trees repeated indefinitely, so as to form a regular group with rows running in various directions.
  • n. The position of planets when distant from each other five signs, or 150°.
  • n. A quincuncial arrangement, as of the parts of a flower in æstivation. See Quincuncial, 2.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An arrangement of five objects in a square, one at each corner and one in the middle (thus, ); especially, an arrangement, as of trees, in such squares continuously.
  • n. In botany, same as quincuncial estivation (which see, under quincuncial).
  • n. In astrology, the position of planets when distant from each other five signs or 150°.
  • n. A Roman brass coin of five unciæ.
  • n. A reliquary in the shape of a cross, the four parts of which can be folded over the central one.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin quīncūnx, quīncūnc-, five twelfths : quīnque, five; see penkwe in Indo-European roots + ūncia, twelfth part of a unit; see ounce1.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin quincunx

Examples

Comments

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  • Also inconjunct.

    April 17, 2018

  • It particularly relates to the laying out of orchards, the alternating rows of trees being arranged in groups of five as on dice.

    April 6, 2009

  • JM walks to each corner of the room, then stands in the exact centre and mutters 'Quincunx'

    February 1, 2009

  • An arrangement of five objects with one at each corner of a rectangle or square and one at the center.

    it's like the 5 on a die

    December 9, 2008

  • Hmm... in fact, it's a lot like "crunchysaviour." ;)

    August 15, 2008

  • This is a brilliant word. It sounds suggestive and rude, but in a very abstract way. It is, of course, neither.

    August 15, 2008

  • In Astrology, Quincunx:

    One of several possible aspects or relationships between planets in a horoscope.

    An arc of 150 degrees. Also known as the inconjunct; this aspect creates a certain uneasiness and a feeling of discomfort and has karmic lessons to teach us. It is a minor aspect.

    Otherwise known as Inconjunct.

    This aspect is the only one not measured by celestial longitude. It is of two or more planets having the same distance in declination in degrees, north or south of the celestial equator.

    February 3, 2008

  • Quincunx is also the name of the holding company for a large outdoor amphitheatre in western Clark County, Washington. The amphitheatre-building project was not very popular in its neighborhood because of the noise and traffic it would bring. I think they adopted the name "Quincunx" rather than something less mysterious (e.g. "Clark County Amphitheatre Company") so that they could hide from their detractors.

    December 4, 2007

  • Nice. How did your opponenet react? Were they upset?

    November 30, 2007

  • I played this in Scrabble once. It was my proudest Scrabble moment.

    November 30, 2007

  • Actually, I first learned this word when I came across the book by the same name (by Charles Palliser). A maddening novel.

    September 19, 2007

  • This is a popular word, especially amongst the wordocracy, but no love from the comment crowd.

    September 19, 2007