JimPeters has looked up 108 words, created 0 lists, listed 0 words, written 12 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 0 words.

Comments by JimPeters

  • Some examples:

    "Oporanthus differs from Zephy-ranthes in a lower insertion of the filaments, a sesile flower, a flattened and erect germ, rounder ovules, and no sejunction of a filament; probably in capsule and ripe seeds still more." -- Oporanthus Herb. An Appendix 38. 1821. - <http://www.amaryllidaceae.org/biblio/1821-Herbert/38.htm>

    "Gross also theorized there that dementia praecox should properly be called dementia sejunctiva, from sejunction, i.e., splitting of consciousness and isolation of ideational and emotional complexes, as later used by Jung and Bleuler." -- Lothane: The Schism between Freud and Jung over Schreber: Its Implications for Method and Doctrine - <http://psychoanalyse.narod.ru/english/lothschr.htm>

    "Carl Wernicke ... suggested that, whereas neurological disorders are associated with brain lesions, psychiatric disorders are associated with disruptions of connectivity, which he called sejunctions." -- Research: Is Autism a Disconnection Disorder? - <http://www.scribd.com/doc/19479744/Is-Autism-a-Disconnection-Disorder>

    "...as death is the separation or sejunction of the soul and the body, so the resurrection is the reunion of them in and unto life..." -- Carm Discussion Forums - <http://forums.carm.org/vbb/showthread.php?34573-Houston-We-Do-Have-a-Problem!>

    "Institutional self-government is distinguished by its tenacity, assimilative power, and transmissible character. It can be successfully exported. But it increases only slowly and it depends on the conscientious willingness of citizens to obey lawful exercises of authority. It is threatened by "sejunction" (schism) if local interests begin to dominate, as in the Netherlands after it had won independence, and it may perish if the institutions themselves become corrupted or degenerate." -- Francis Lieber on the Sources of Civil Liberty - <http://www.nhinet.org/samson.htm>

    May 8, 2011

  • The examples shown for "stive" are errors, typos of "strive" or "stove"--with the exception of example #15, which may be applicable to some definitions.

    Valid example for meaning "stuffed, crowded":

    His chamber was commonly stived with friends or suitors of one kind or other. - Sir H. Wotton. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Stive

    For the above meaning, the word seems to have come down from Middle English, maybe from French "estiver, Spanish "estivar", Latin "stipare".

    It is also Danish and Norwegian for "starch, stiffen".

    The noun meaning "floating dust" comes from Danish.

    May 6, 2011

  • The first example is useless without full quote:

    "Yet, it will be observed, the message was, in its inception, wholly "veridical" — the fault lying in the erroneous symbolic interpretation of the medium."

    April 22, 2011

  • The audio pronunciation of "cicisbeo" offered here does not agree with those I have heard or seen. Dictionary.com offers:

    chee-chiz-bey-oh or, older, si-sis-bee-oh; It. chee-cheez-be-oh

    April 16, 2011

  • Yes, I am new and I didn't know about the case sensitive aspect (or the Community page). I explore word usages (beyond just looking up words) using OneLook as my base. Some online dictionaries listed there will always offer choice of link for cap or lower case; but usually it makes no difference which you click, both bring up the same entry (as Dictionary.com). Same for Wordnik in the case of "sybarite".

    April 14, 2011

  • Thanks for your reply about the proper name problem. I think it is a good idea to have separate entries for proper name versions of words. However, most people are accustomed to entering lower case, as Google is not case sensitive. Therefore, being case sensitive here may not fully serve. An alternative would be a "disambiguation" page, as used on Wikipedia, allowing a choice of entries.

    I note, though, that in the case of "sybarite", both capped and lower case bring the same entry with both proper and lexical definitions.

    April 14, 2011

  • Thank you for tending to the problem of too many inappropriate proper name entries for "sybarite." I am so glad to find comments are taken seriously, and someone cares to correct problems.

    I must add that in eliminating the capitalized examples, many good ones were also removed. In this case, the word is sometimes capitalized in its lexical usage, so some capped entries may be acceptable. If you google "rather a sybarite", you will see this. In addition, some of the capitalized examples were appropriate to the definition of the the word as "a native or inhabitant of Sybaris". Some examples of this would be desirable.

    Unfortunately there is no substitute for reviewing entries.

    April 14, 2011

  • In answer to your comment at "brogan", asking where the proper name entries I had mentioned were, I entered the following:

    To Progasus: They were removed, along with my complaint (as it should). I am gratified to see that comments are attended to. However, in this case, although the capitalized entries were apparently blanket removed, the three citations one first sees are also useless for other reasons. Although I can appreciate that culling the caps is a practical approach, it is not a substitute for reviewing the examples.

    April 14, 2011

  • To Progasus: They were removed, along with my complaint (as it should). I am gratified to see that comments are attended to. However, in this case, although the capitalized entries were apparently blanket removed, the three citations one first sees are also useless for other reasons. Although I can appreciate that culling the caps is a practical approach, it is not a substitute for reviewing the examples.

    April 14, 2011

  • As I explore this site, I find many entries whose examples are poor or useless. In this case, what few citations there are usually have too little context to provide a guide to usage.

    April 14, 2011

  • The citations using for Felucca (in Ultima Online) and La Felucca (a resort in Spain) need to be culled out of the examples. Proper name entries should be separate from the lexical entries, as the mix only confuses matters.

    April 14, 2011

  • Something needs to be done about the words which are so commonly used as proper names that the usage examples are predominantly useless for our purpose here. I assume that there is an automatic gathering of citations from the internet. There needs to be some way of filtering the inappropriate ones out, or else someone needs to review entries and cull them.

    April 14, 2011

  • The examples given for "Ghazi" are for its use as a proper name, not relative to the definitions given. Clearly, the citations are derived automatically without review. I suggest that review is done on all word examples and the useless ones culled out.

    April 13, 2011

  • The examples given are for the use of "Versant" as a proper name, not relative to the definitions given above. Are the citations acquired automatically, without review?

    April 13, 2011

Comments for JimPeters

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  • Hello again! I just read your comment about the pronunciation of the word "cicisbeo." I've left a note for you there about Wordnik's resident orthoepist.

    April 16, 2011

  • Dese guys will tell you it's not a Disguise.

    April 15, 2011

  • Bilby, I refuse to answer until you explain what a "diguise" is.

    April 15, 2011

  • Hang on, who's this ruzuzu? Are you Ruzuzu in diguise or just slumming it as a common noun?

    April 15, 2011

  • What ruzuzu said, both times.

    April 14, 2011

  • P.S. Your comments led me to "versant," which I was delighted to discover is a word from heraldry. Thanks--and welcome to Wordnik!

    April 14, 2011

  • Hello, JimPeters! Your comments have generated some interesting discussion on the community page. Wordnik is case-sensitive, which means that searching for "Polish" will yield results about the country and searching for "polish" will yield results about smoothness and fingernails. Hope that helps!

    April 14, 2011