Comments by chained_bear

Show previous 200 comments...

  • Very well! Give him... cake!

    August 16, 2011

  • I could've sworn I had a list somewhere of misspellings I saw in actual work documents. Couldn't find it. Anyway, just saw this one.

    Edit: Ho! Here it is.

    August 16, 2011

  • You are a hottie with a naughty body.

    June 26, 2011

  • That may well be, hernesheir, but my first thought is of Edgar Hansen. :)

    June 2, 2011

  • Indeed. As seen here. Schweet.

    June 2, 2011

  • Dontcry, I remember that scene very well! It isn't the first one I think of, but then there are so many others...

    May 23, 2011

  • zuzu, would that were true.

    May 20, 2011

  • As reesetee says, it's just pants! Or... maybe... PANCE.

    May 20, 2011

  • Who remembers Johnny Dangerously? "Did you know your last name is an adverb?"

    Anyway... Joe Piscopo's character was always calling people fargin iceholes. At one point they show a newspaper quoting him and it's actually spelled that way. I still think this euphemism is better than the actual phrase.

    May 14, 2011

  • I've been having "eat what I want day" for... well, going on ten months. I tell you, some whiskey-soaked fufluns en flambé sound pretty fargin good right now.

    May 14, 2011

  • Blahaha!! I forgot all about this.

    May 14, 2011

  • I should just mention, again, that as much as I am not looking forward to labor, I know that on the other side of my travail there's Proctofoam. And that makes me feel just a little bit better.

    May 14, 2011

  • See also spraints. Which you'd think, if you're an otter and you're going poo, you'd probably do more than one spraint anyhow. Right? Right?

    May 13, 2011

  • See also spraint. Apparently otters can poo just one little bit of poo at a time. What a skill!!

    May 13, 2011

  • Ah, now, *that* term belongs on this list! And thank you! It's been a long time since that list (or any of mine, really...) has had any additions. And such a good one.

    "Buck up your courage-bags, boys!"

    May 11, 2011

  • So hopelessly behind on comments that I will never, ever catch up and don't have time even to try. Missing my Wordnik buddies. :-(

    May 10, 2011

  • It has taken me six days to read this page.

    Last time I changed my answers at the last minute and got more wrong than if I hadn't changed any. So this time I refused to change any, and look! I am firmly in the middle of the herd.

    *lends extra tiaras to everyone*
    *dons crash helmet with specially-fitted tiara*
    *fufluns around on a unicycle*

    P.S. I chose wodge because it is a delightful word that makes me think of peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches. And what bear doesn't love those? But I also chose wodge because this game is too damn hard for small bear-brains and I wanted there to be at least ONE easy (I thought) entry. :)

    May 10, 2011

  • Please. Add it!

    May 4, 2011

  • "Were you looking for the rut delinquent of Wordnik? NO.

    See comments on horndog.

    May 4, 2011

  • He obviously never met my dog. (EIGHT!! Boo-yah!)

    May 2, 2011

  • I saw the picture of the building. Didn't look like a mansion at all to me, unless you define mansion as just "large building," but in that case, the Empire State Building is a mansion. Is it not. Therefore... *needs fuflun*

    May 2, 2011

  • *fufluns all around, just because*

    May 2, 2011

  • "Hair Today" and "Rapunzel's." "Shear Genius," "Shear Magic" and any number of "Shear" whatevers.

    April 29, 2011

  • Spreadsheet's done! Not that my results will be any better than they were last time...

    bilby -- sinistral
    blafferty -- hidelugged
    dontcry -- tear-resistant
    erinmckean -- calepinerienne
    fbharjo -- harlequin
    frindley -- mediæval
    frogapplause -- heartstringsplucker
    gangerh -- emordnilap
    hernesheir -- balsamaceous
    mollusque -- I wanted to say emordnilap. I'm gonna say od instead, then kick myself later.
    oroboros -- hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophile. And if it's not, it should be.
    PossibleUnderscore -- chrestomathic
    Prolagus -- panda. Again, if it's not, it should be. As huggable as any extinct lagomorph could be.
    pterodactyl -- mortsafe
    reesetee -- present
    ruzuzu -- slopseller
    seanahan -- prodigal
    sionnach -- boggy
    Wordnicolina -- greenhorn?
    Wordplayer -- ascian?
    yarb -- queasy?

    April 28, 2011

  • Oh shit, I never finished my spreadsheet. Wait till I get home tonight!!

    April 27, 2011

  • Seen here.

    April 23, 2011

  • You know, reesetee, I don't think there'll be many changes. Not sure about additions, but I'll keep a list if I come up with any. I think the dearth is because, rather prosaically, we are too exhausted to come up with new ones.

    April 21, 2011

  • And one of my friends did say that any name with diacritical marks gets 2 points...

    April 21, 2011

  • See Mjöllner.

    April 21, 2011

  • My very serious friend comments on this name: "The "j" is pronounced like a "y." Mjöllner was the name of the Hammer of Thor that was imbued with magical powers, not unlike the dorje in the Buddhist tradition. Actually, Dorje is a good name too. Thor used his hammer to smite the ice giants. It has other meanings too...."

    April 21, 2011

  • (psst!! Link please!)

    April 21, 2011

  • "We don't have any matching examples for how to say ghostbusters upon cue of who you gonna call, but we're constantly adding material, so please check back soon."

    April 21, 2011

  • See comments on my list, at right, for an explanation. That is, if you feel you really need one....

    April 21, 2011

  • Ooh! You should pillage from this list and this list. I mean, if you want to. :)

    April 21, 2011

  • Wordniknack is pretty cool.

    April 21, 2011

  • Seen here. Who knew they were spheres?

    April 21, 2011

  • reesetee... you forgot Broccolino.

    April 21, 2011

  • ... this was a real person.

    April 21, 2011

  • I see no vegetable-based names at all on this list. Add away! ;)

    Edit: I mean... except for Kale.

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Archer."

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Shadow." ... Isn't this a better name for a cat?

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Advises."

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Council." (I wonder if he meant to say "Counsel"?)

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Friend."

    April 21, 2011

  • According to my friend, this name means "Iron."

    April 21, 2011

  • You know, nobody puts this person in a corner.

    April 21, 2011

  • ... for Thaddeus Stevens and Charles Sumner.

    April 21, 2011

  • ... for the Grimké sisters.

    April 21, 2011

  • Around :50, I was muttering, "Omigosh omigosh omigosh omigosh..." That's teh alsome, Pro. Thanks!

    (p.s. apropos of nothing... isn't the Roman one spelled Colosseum?)

    April 19, 2011

  • Wow, really? I actually stopped working on this list because I got grossed/creeped out. But I'm still glad I made it. :)

    April 19, 2011

  • reesetee, I've spent the last few years developing an immunity to adding words to lists.

    April 19, 2011

  • Discussion/explanation can be seen here.

    April 19, 2011

  • Yes, I found it hard to stop adding terms! I think you can find this on Google Books if you want more. :)

    April 18, 2011

  • You're probably looking for iroquoisy.

    April 14, 2011

  • There's a Woody Guthrie song about that day.

    April 14, 2011

  • Umm...?

    April 6, 2011

  • Sure, it's expensive till you figure out pounds-per-square-inch. Those greedy bastards had no right! How the hell do they think my tiara looks with all that damn camo around?!

    April 6, 2011

  • Also the town my great-grandmother was born in. :)

    April 6, 2011

  • You know what? You're right.

    March 23, 2011

  • ruzuzu, that's disgusting. Added. :)

    March 23, 2011

  • If these weren't real, and real disturbing, they ought to be in the Arsenal of Civil Defunse.

    March 17, 2011

  • I'll play, despite my earlier protests, but only if there's no poop-slinging. (bilby...) ;)

    March 17, 2011

  • Hey. Hey. I don't wear dresses unless in extreme duress--like the late months of pregnancy, or someone's damn wedding.

    Don't call it wordshowers. That feels spiky.

    March 17, 2011

  • Far as I can tell, this is the 600th word on my Dinosaurs list. :)

    Newly discovered; this news seen in this article.

    March 17, 2011

  • Goddamn, this s#$% is some good-ass s#$%. I haven't had Korean food in way too long. *sniff*

    March 10, 2011

  • *wonders if Skip dispenses curling tips to his sugar-making buddies*

    March 10, 2011

  • Fat Tuesday. Though in my case, I don't see how that's different from any other day.

    March 10, 2011

  • I thought it was herdshos.

    March 10, 2011

  • See Euphrates.

    March 10, 2011

  • I love this word. However, it always makes me think of a town, Ephrata (pronounced kind of like EFF-erta, though you hardly hear the R at all), near my hometown. And then I always think of this girl at an indoor-guard competition at some huge high school miles and miles away from both Ephrata and my hometown, who misread the sign on the classroom door that was meant for the kids from Ephrata H.S., and said aloud, "Eupharta."

    March 10, 2011

  • It would also be cool, if there's going to be a formal, if you could let us know ahead of time. It's pure chance I wore a nice dress today. *pouts*

    P.S. On the bright side, thanks for recognizing my request!

    March 10, 2011

  • Across the site, in IE8.

    (I just tried Firefox and it doesn't do it there! Instead, every last blessed comment is in bold type. Grr.)

    March 10, 2011

  • Seen in the first line of page 2 of this article.

    March 10, 2011

  • Nice new homepage!
    However, I'm distraught over a disabled feature that made life on Wordnik worth living. Why can't I right-click and open a window(on a list, comments, another word, etc.) in a new tab? When I do so, I get a tab window saying "unrecognized request formal."

    The same thing happens when I use the back button. Or reload. Why? Why?

    Now, I have never been to an unrecognized request formal, but surely it's just like other formals. Right? Surely what I'm wearing today would be appropriate.

    Also, the new homepage is cool and all... but it takes forever to load on my super-fast work computer with a T1-whatever connection. I shudder to think of the speed at home on my dinosaur computer. :( Is there an option for dinosaur luddites?

    March 10, 2011

  • Seen here, with thanks to Prolagus. :)

    March 3, 2011

  • But laser elbows and laser kneecaps would be way more fun.

    March 2, 2011

  • Or that Australian eco-horrible film, Cane Toads.

    February 24, 2011

  • I refuse.

    February 24, 2011

  • Just saw this in a document I was editing about the War of 1812. Priceless mental images arose.

    February 24, 2011

  • hernesheir, tits are not always, or even often, entirely... uhh... symmetrical.

    I'll leave it at that.

    February 24, 2011

  • With thanks to Prolagus, here is an article about this new (?) "thunder-thighs" dinosaur.

    I guess I mean "newly discovered species of" rather than "new."

    February 24, 2011

  • Hm. Paging through a list that's more than 100 words long presents a problem for me at the moment. I'll get the count (e.g. "Words 101 through 200 of 335") but the list that appears is still actually words 1 through 100.

    Maybe I clicked it wrong. Or maybe it's really showing all 335 and the numbers, not the list, are what's wrong.

    Signed, Too Lazy to Actually Count 335 Words.

    February 14, 2011

  • We also spell this wubby.

    February 14, 2011

  • Also insultiment.

    February 14, 2011

  • I have collected some on my list "Favorite Words that Aren't Really Words." Only, they're not all my coinages. :)

    I don't feel qualified to add anything to this list, but I will submit that teh alsome got some serious play at one point. I vaguely recall I had some ulterior purpose for inventing hexadodecaroon too.

    Npydyuan invented nosestickinery, which I love.

    Would reesetee's "Only on Wordie/Wordnik" list be helpful, at all? If nothing else, it's a hoot to read.

    February 14, 2011

  • Fucking capital letters!

    February 10, 2011

  • sea mink.

    February 10, 2011

  • For years, those stores will do that to you. "Would you like a bag for that? Thanks for coming in. I'll most likely kill you in the morning." It's important to have something else going on, like learning to fence.

    February 10, 2011

  • But do you know the fuflun man? He lives on Dreary Lane. (It's one street over from Drury.)

    February 9, 2011

  • I love fuflunderwear. It's soooooo sooooooft and icing-full.

    February 9, 2011

  • Well, not anymore, of course--habitat destruction. Have you seen a fireswamp lately? I didn't think so.

    February 9, 2011

  • I don't think so... Neither are Rodents of Unusual Size, though, so you can't really count this as complete.

    February 9, 2011

  • Seen here, it's an insult dressed up like a compliment. Complementing the apolobuke.

    February 4, 2011

  • Apology + rebuke. Seen here. Complements the insultiment nicely.

    February 4, 2011

  • This came up in a staff meeting yesterday, not for any particular newsworthiness but because some people from there might be visiting our workplace soon. And today I saw this news online--very iroquoisy!

    February 4, 2011

  • Moton Museum. Seriously.

    February 4, 2011

  • Damocritis the stuff; Democritus the dude? I don't know. At this point you'll have to ask Stephen Maturin. It seems he took it with his fictional self to his fictional grave.

    February 1, 2011

  • ... Did I say that? I don't even *know* Leonard Cohen.

    February 1, 2011

  • ... One of these things is not like the other.

    Wait...

    None of these things is really at all like any of the others.

    February 1, 2011

  • ... Cheetoism?

    February 1, 2011

  • Confectio Damocritis.

    February 1, 2011

  • May God and the saints (and the Virgin Mary, as an extra helper) preserve you, sionnach.

    February 1, 2011

  • This is a great list idea!

    February 1, 2011

  • Great. Now I'll spend the rest of the day singing that song from 1776: Pencilinaaaaa, pencilinaaaaa... refuuuuuse to uuuuuuuse ... the pennnnn!

    February 1, 2011

  • You were actually looking for grape riffles. No, trust me—you were.

    January 28, 2011

  • I don't know. Were you looking for grape riffle?

    January 28, 2011

  • Have you seen this book? Great fun. Not as much as the actual novels, but easier to lug around.

    January 28, 2011

  • ... do you smell something on this page?

    January 28, 2011

  • Of all the damn things to be Iroquoisy.

    January 28, 2011

  • I love the list this is on. What a delightful page.

    January 28, 2011

  • At last!!! At last, someone made me the perfect list!! Oh please let it be comprehensive, please, please, please...

    January 28, 2011

  • Yes! Spawn wanted to adopt Drogo as a confirmation name.

    January 28, 2011

  • I've heard it too. I hereby corroborate.

    January 28, 2011

  • *sings* Thanks, frindley!

    January 27, 2011

  • Why the hell not? Confectio Damocritis to you too.

    January 26, 2011

  • Either that, or it means "same to you." (Making it slightly more useful in everyday conversation, at least with non-Wordnikkers.)

    January 26, 2011

  • Aw, confectio Damocritis to you too.

    ... That must be what that phrase means. It must mean "fufluns with grape riffles on top." Hm. Learn something every day.

    January 26, 2011

  • Good. As soon as I figure out what the hell that means, you'll get some.

    January 26, 2011

  • Would you like your fuflun with grape riffles on top?

    January 26, 2011

  • Also, just for fun, see grape riffles.

    January 26, 2011

  • "Employed in Repairing the Redoubts & Erecting Battries now within reach of the Enemies Grape Riffles grapeshot'>cannons firing grapeshot and wall artillery Pieces."
    —Anonymous Letter, “Siege of York & Gloucester Virginia,” September 14–October 17, 1781. Housed in the John D. Rockefeller Library, Williamsburg, Virginia.

    I really would prefer if grape riffles meant a kind of flavored icing used on fufluns.

    January 26, 2011

  • *tenting fingers* Mwahahahaha...

    January 19, 2011

  • You might try checking out this site for a definition.

    January 19, 2011

  • See Old New York.

    January 17, 2011

  • milos... Mister Adams, leave me a-LOOOOOOOONE!!

    January 17, 2011

  • If you can't believe it isn't listed, can you believe there's a perfect list for it?

    January 11, 2011

  • That's what I always say.

    January 11, 2011

  • It's hard not to love a dancing bear.

    January 11, 2011

  • Not me, pterodactyl, though I have heard caterwauling used to describe pipes too. :)

    January 11, 2011

  • But now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople.

    January 11, 2011

  • Why'd they change it?

    January 11, 2011

  • So, if you have a date in Constantinople...?

    January 11, 2011

  • How should I know? On the old Wordie there was a glitch that if you had dupe words on a list and deleted one, it would delete both. So I don't bother with duplicates anymore.

    January 5, 2011

  • Citrul'? (short for citrulo? I don't know if I spelled that right.) Also holy rollers.

    January 5, 2011

  • Seen here.

    January 5, 2011

  • Yarb's definition can be found in the comments on this list.

    January 5, 2011

  • Also, I think that whole concept came up on the Aubrey/Maturin list, which (if you think THIS is a black hole) I recommend not delving too deeply or greedily, because a balrog may come up.

    January 4, 2011

  • Ah. I was operating on the older definition of smallclothes, meaning anything worn under the outer garments, which would include (for example) a woman's shift and a man's long shirt (long enough that the shirttails covered the crotchal area and almost down to the knees). I know from my very brief days wearing re-enactor clothes (don't ask) that "smallclothes" meant (means?) the whites that go under one's regimental coat, so obviously that could include the close-fitting knee breeches aforesaid.

    January 4, 2011

  • Well, no, because I still haven't found out WTF it is.

    January 4, 2011

  • Not all smallclothes are worn below the belt, however.

    January 4, 2011

  • (Holy shit. Four years ago??)

    January 4, 2011

  • A fossil bivalve shell of the genus Caprinella (OED).

    January 4, 2011

  • Also misspelled (by me---thank you very much, I'll be here all week) as icthyoacanthotoxism.

    January 4, 2011

  • The difference between ichthyoacanthotoxism, which I misspelled when adding it to my list, and ichthyosarcotoxism is that the former is poisoning resulting from the bite or sting of a fish, while the latter is poisoning resulting from eating a toxic fish.

    January 4, 2011

  • When I have clothes to wash, I do laundry. I don't think I ever say "launder" as a verb, unless I'm referring to someone's ability or tendency to run illegal funds through a legitimate business.

    My understanding is western PA-Ohio folks also say warsh. I know this because someone I work with is from that area and in my job we frequently refer to George Warshington. *nerves grating*

    January 4, 2011

  • Oh, I already have a couple lists about the crotchal area.

    Wait... that's not what you meant.

    January 4, 2011

  • We have been enjoying "The Wire" on DVD. I love that it's such a great show and that it's set in Baltimore--which doesn't get enough attention. The other night was an episode where the gang of cops was all eating crabs at a particularly famous crab restaurant (which I know only from an episode of "No Reservations").

    Sorry if this seems completely out of the blue--your comment about Baltimore on another page reminded me of your geographic-ness. :)

    On further thought, it is depressing how much of my knowledge comes from TV. *sigh*

    January 4, 2011

  • This is brilliant. I wonder how many other elegantly simple solutions are out there that could improve countless people's lives.

    January 4, 2011

  • gaiters? spatterdashes? or their shortened version, spats? legwarmers?

    Of course all these don't involve what a TSA official recently called "the crotchal area," so I could see if they don't fit those made-up rules in your head.

    January 3, 2011

  • I suppose it's somewhat better (though probably as ineffective) as squirting mercury up one's penis (the old treatment for syphilis).

    January 3, 2011

  • This is incredibly useful.

    January 3, 2011

  • ... eeeeeeeeyeeeeeeeww ...

    January 3, 2011

  • Interesting comment about coffee beans on salutiferous.

    January 3, 2011

  • Interesting comment can be found on salutiferous.

    January 3, 2011

  • Re: the coffee bean: "As for this salutiferous berry, of so general a use through all the regions of the east, it is sufficiently known, when prepared, to be moderately hot, and of a very drying attenuating and cleansing quality; whence reason infers, that its decoction must contain many good physical properties, and cannot but be an incomparable remedy to dissolve crudities, comfort the brain, and dry up ill humors in the stomach."
    Coffee-Houses Vindicated, 1675, seen here.

    January 3, 2011

  • Hee! See of Orient are. (It's on another list--one I completely forgot about!)

    December 16, 2010

  • When I went to the liquor store* in Boston, I couldn't believe the wide variety of beverages. I was Pakistunned.

    *See packie.

    December 16, 2010

  • *(hacking cough)*

    December 16, 2010

  • Yes. Yes, we do.

    December 16, 2010

  • I disagree, rolig. "To daze or render senseless" certainly can apply to the level of complexity in Afghanistan/Pakistan, without there necessarily being a blow to one's head about it. I think the result is similar to the result of a blow to one's head--in the same way people say "I can't think about that right now--it gives me a headache." They don't mean it *literally* hurts their head, but that its complexity is... well... stunning.

    Also, as I read definition 2, I think it really only applies/is commonly used in reference to a person's attractiveness, and actually relates to definition 1 in the sense that the person is SO attractive, their beauty SO amazing, that it's as if one is stunned (rendered senseless) to look at them.

    I agree the journalist could have found a better term, but this one's rather more neutral than others that could apply here, and given the political undertones of the Af/Pak situation and the fact that the article was about Holbrooke--not the situation itself--the relative neutrality of the term was probably a good thing.

    P.S. nice to see these kinds of conversations--and have time to read them. :)

    December 16, 2010

  • Seen in this New York Times article.

    December 16, 2010

  • Wow. A word to describe how I've been feeling lately.

    December 15, 2010

  • Nothing can stop me!! Grrrr!!

    December 15, 2010

  • Here's my underwear.

    November 26, 2010

  • salee rover. I seem to have lost the ability to add to this list. :-(

    November 19, 2010

  • Aaaaagh!

    November 19, 2010

  • (psst... is it Rembrandt?)

    November 19, 2010

  • ... or when they're swooping your head in spring. The fuckers.

    November 19, 2010

  • It sounds like this: blrbth thrbl? Nmi-nmi-nm.

    November 19, 2010

  • Cole slaw!!

    November 18, 2010

  • You know, ████████ is probably the single best comment I've seen on Wordie.

    November 17, 2010

  • I want a picture.

    November 16, 2010

  • Also seen in this nifty article.

    November 16, 2010

  • I never tried it. My lactation consultant told me that in her experience working with nursing moms over the years, it hasn't usually resulted in gaining more than around an ounce a day--and while that sounds like a lot, if you're struggling to produce enough milk for your baby, there are other methods that seem to work better for more people. Of course, some women swear by it, so... *shrug*

    November 16, 2010

  • "Were you looking for H.I. there?"

    (Is this feature the Wordnik.com version of WeirdNet?)

    November 16, 2010

  • Hork if you like. It is also used as an herbal supplement by women who need to increase their milk supply.

    November 12, 2010

  • Excellent point, leather-ears. Very cogently put.

    November 12, 2010

  • Maybe it has to do with the "finishing" sound of each word, e.g. "fly" is going to have a long-I sound no matter what follows it, because it's the end of that word. "Ice" wouldn't, because it's the S-sound that finishes that word.

    I bet qroqqa has something better.

    November 9, 2010

  • Now declared eradicated, according to this article in the NY Times.

    November 9, 2010

  • Okay, really it should be cape horn voice.

    November 9, 2010

  • ring ring ring ring ring ring ring, banana-birrrrrd...

    November 9, 2010

  • I have only ever seen this word in a modern cookbook featuring medieval recipes, that says "Ask your butcher to chine the joint." "WTF," I thought—first off it's assuming I even have a butcher—and didn't do anything of the kind.

    Recipes are more like guidelines anyway.

    November 9, 2010

  • Teh alsome, John. Thanks.

    November 9, 2010

  • qroqqa (as always) put it better than I could, but I concur: where you mentally place the S-sound has an effect on the preceding vowel.

    I think I may have posted a similar conundrum re: "writer" vs. "rider" (for Americans who don't pronounce the T as a T but more like a D). But I can't remember where (and it isn't on either writer or rider).

    November 8, 2010

  • Interestingly, and most people don't know this, the Nazi government insisted that the Zeppelin company put a swastika on the tail fin. The company put it only on one side of the ship. IIRC, when the ship was ordered to fly over the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, the pilot flew in a circle over the gathering as ordered, but turned the ship in such a way that the swastikas were not displayed to the crowd. I honestly can't remember where I read that, but I think it was in the book The Great Dirigibles by John Toland. (Excellent book, BTW.)

    P.S. Cool pics of the ship and a short clip of it flying over NYC can be found here.

    November 5, 2010

  • The ship (and the person) are actually spelled Hindenburg.

    November 5, 2010

  • :-)

    November 3, 2010

  • Rolig, I agree with the capping, and I've had the same difficulty. I see a couple of "old" Wordizens on Facebook but it's not the same.

    November 3, 2010

  • Is it just me, or is the option/pulldown menu to add a word to your lists not appearing on word pages right now?

    Edit: Nevermind. It's me.

    November 3, 2010

  • Rolig. How I've missed you. *yoinks word*
    (note: it's also listed under its non-capitalized version, hottentottenpotentatentantenattentat)

    November 3, 2010

  • That's an amazing accomplishment--to have one's hiccups charged with murder. How do I do that?

    November 3, 2010

  • I should not have clicked on this page.

    November 3, 2010

  • I'm going to tell a political joke now, so if you don't like those, cover your eyes.

    Q: What's the difference between Rush Limbaugh and the Hindenburg?

    A: One is a gigantic Nazi gasbag, and the other is an airship.

    November 2, 2010

  • Dude!! I found a Diet of Worms joke!!! My people... :)

    November 2, 2010

  • This describes my twenty-pound dog. See the hopes and dreams of a neighborhood of trick-or-treaters.

    November 2, 2010

  • My dog is so eaty!!

    November 2, 2010

  • Keyboard plaque sounds like exactly what it is.

    November 2, 2010

  • Can see a clip here. I remember this show.

    October 27, 2010

  • Seen on this Wordnik page.

    October 27, 2010

  • LOL Tapirs. I kid you not. (Note: Not surprisingly, they are unfunny.)

    October 27, 2010

  • Yeah? Do you get your lovin' in the evenin' time?

    October 27, 2010

  • "Send your picturrrres... to dear old Captain Noaaaaaaaah...
    Send todaaaaaaaay, send riiiiight awaaaaaaaaay..." (Very bad recording here.) Totally SFW.

    October 27, 2010

  • Truly, it's more correctly spelled Cap'n Crunch. But that's stupid, so we should let it slide. :)

    October 27, 2010

  • Wow. Well... I'm just glad he didn't eat the seasoning packet--that would have made him horribly sick. Though, admittedly, if I were a dog, I'd probably just eat the plain noodles, too.

    October 27, 2010

  • I was going to, but can't. That doesn't mean that I don't know about a dozen people who *are* going. Post pictures!

    October 27, 2010

  • Really? That's the one that got you?

    October 27, 2010

  • A.K.A. a bunch of Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, Almond Joys, and Milk Duds.

    October 26, 2010

  • This whole conversation is extremely off-putting.

    October 26, 2010

  • Okay, I know what this word means according to dictionaries, but when a mother says it of her young, rambunctious boys (for example), that's certainly NOT the meaning she's ascribing.

    I'm looking for a synonym in the phrase "the poor buggers," that doesn't use the original word I was thinking of ("bastards") and does not sound British ("sods"). Any suggestions?

    I also found this interesting conversation.

    October 25, 2010

  • I like the usage on the front page: "as big as a seventy-four's poop-lantern."

    October 25, 2010

  • Probably the better place to post the comment would be on the Ronald Reagan page, but thanks! I think it's posted there now. That way future Wordnikkers will find it. :)

    October 21, 2010

  • don't you is definitely one for me too. can't get no and I try are ones I find particularly annoying.

    There are also a ton of Stan Freberg-related ones for me. Really? is one. Sit down is another.

    Does anyone remember Schoolhouse Rock? Carefully?

    October 21, 2010

  • ... still, I would hope that all violins are boneless and skinless. *worried*

    October 15, 2010

  • Singular is Stolperstein. More info here.

    October 15, 2010

  • I just learned about Stolperstein (plural Stolpersteine) today. Fascinating. More info here.

    October 15, 2010

  • It isn't just the media.

    October 14, 2010

  • Interesting headline here.

    October 13, 2010

  • At this point, I decide I love this page, only instead of "love," I type <3 and then ask someone how to make that little heart symbol.

    October 13, 2010

  • I know this from Star Trek.

    October 13, 2010

  • No, cuz he's a wanker.

    October 13, 2010

  • Whereupon I chime in, late as usual, with something completely unrelated based on personal experience, and loaded with qualifiers so as to avoid possibly maybe someday offending someone who might read this comment, though it will (usually) kill the thread.

    October 12, 2010

  • Wanker.

    October 12, 2010

  • ... That's about right.

    October 11, 2010

  • That's spectacular. Look how fatty North Dakota and Colorado are! And Texas is nicely marbled...

    We used to play a game whenever my mom (or I) made beef cutlets for dinner. I taught Spawn the rule that one could eat one only after identifying a state or nation that its outline resembled.

    We actually still play this game.

    October 11, 2010

  • Cool! LOTD! Thanks for the hat-tip! :)

    October 9, 2010

  • ... actually I rather like that confession. It seems a fine punctuation.

    October 9, 2010

  • "In the libretto of J.S. Bach's 'Coffee Cantata' (1732) a young bourgeois German woman threatens her father:
    No lover shall woo me
    Unless I have his pledge
    Written in the marriage settlement,
    That he will allow me
    To drink coffee when I please."
    —Antony Wild, Coffee: A Dark History (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2004), 146

    October 9, 2010

  • Usage can be found on furfurylthiol.

    October 9, 2010

  • Usage can be found on furfurylthiol.

    October 9, 2010

  • Usage can be found on furfurylthiol.

    October 9, 2010

  • Usage can be found on furfurylthiol.

    October 9, 2010

  • "Over eight hundred different chemical ingredients have been identified inside the coffee bean, glorying in such names as furfurylthiol, furfuraldehyde, oxazole, and ethylfuraneol. Another, trimthylamin, exists in minute quantities: it is also found in putrefying fish. Like perfume, coffee uses the most outré of ingredients to work its wonders."
    —Antony Wild, Coffee: A Dark History (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2004), 193

    October 9, 2010

  • "During roasting, a series of complex chemical reactions take place that develop the characteristic coffee aroma and flavour. ... The most important change takes place when the interior of the bean becomes hot; by a process known as pyrolosis, the carbohydrates and fat form new molecules, generally known as oils. These contain all the flavour and aroma we associate with coffee...."
    —Antony Wild, Coffee: A Dark History (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2004), 193

    October 9, 2010

  • I learned it from a Civil War journal called The Rebel Yell and the Yankee Hurrah. The gentleman (who was from Maine, if I recall) mentioned that on the march the new recruits had been offered refreshments by locals, and some were "city boys" and didn't know that eating the lights (lungs) of a cow wasn't going to be very satisfying.

    October 7, 2010

  • see pappardelle.

    October 7, 2010

  • See also slavocracy.

    October 6, 2010

  • Also spelled slaveocracy.

    October 6, 2010

  • Awesome, Marcela!

    You might want to pillage from this list too, if it's helpful.

    October 6, 2010

  • I do this all the time. Thanks for listing, frindley.

    October 6, 2010

  • Nonsense. That's the essence of Wordnik. :) It's just less obvious to stalkers than it would be on Facebook.

    October 6, 2010

  • Odd. I rather like eel when it's NOT jellied. Then it's most definitely not like eating brains.

    Not that I would know, or anything.

    October 6, 2010

  • Asativum, what about protective headgear?! Didn't it fight back?!

    October 6, 2010

  • accidentally invented here. Sorry.

    October 6, 2010

  • I believe the lights are generally the lungs. Which kind of makes sense... if one has the lights (lungs) scared out of one, one can't breathe.

    But I agree the consciousness/eyeballs angle works better.

    And I almost typed "iballs." What a stupid word.

    October 6, 2010

  • Ohhh... good one. Disgusting but satisfying once it's done. I love the gluggy noise of the water actually going DOWN the drain, which is a great sound after you haven't heard it for a while.

    Hair catchers work great, but sometimes it takes a while to find an effective one.

    October 5, 2010

  • Very well then. Thanks!

    September 28, 2010

  • fbharjo, isn't it either Algonkian or Algonquin?

    September 28, 2010

  • ...eeew...

    September 16, 2010

  • ... Could it be any more specific?

    September 16, 2010

  • Lovely! Thanks for sharing. That pretty much nails this list, doesn't it? :)

    September 9, 2010

  • I have decided what this word means. When someone is so adorable that they are beyond able-to-be-adored, and the adoration is actually mandatory, person is said to be adoratory.

    September 5, 2010

  • P.S. I got rather a load of guff for those tags, by the way.

    September 5, 2010

  • Interestingly (not), I made a comment on my profile, then went to edit it, and (three times) got the "Oops, we screwed up, please reload" note--which by the way is so small and unobtrusive as to be nearly invisible--and never was able to edit said comment. :(

    September 5, 2010

  • Uhh... that's right...
    *suspicious*
    Are you stalking me?

    September 5, 2010

  • See bilboquet.

    September 2, 2010

  • We always said "chuck a u-ie" (east coast USA). But then, we were strange people.

    August 28, 2010

  • I believe that it's someone who prays very frequently--an *excessively* pious person (or someone who's ostentatious about their prayer), rather than simply someone who prays. At least, that's what its original meaning was. (19th century?)

    August 26, 2010

  • Overheard in a meeting today: "'Click on' can't be thesaurused."

    August 26, 2010

  • also cytomegalovirus.

    August 18, 2010

  • OED has wronger but not wrongest. But it does have wrong-foot: "2. fig. To disconcert by an unexpected move; to catch unprepared."

    August 13, 2010

  • Now, now. Prolagus loves those!

    August 13, 2010

  • Errrrrrb!

    By the way, speaking of "h," "an historian" drives me batshit. It's "a historian."

    Errrrrrb!

    August 9, 2010

  • I really wanted to buy the thing, but each volume is about $120. Check your local library!

    August 5, 2010

  • You know what I miss? The "search all of Wordie" feature that used to bring up comments, tags, etc. as well as the actual word page. I guess it's not possible here on Wordnik but sometimes I do miss it.

    August 4, 2010

  • *wonders if that sentence has ever been uttered before in the history of the world*

    August 4, 2010

  • For future reference... here.

    August 4, 2010

  • If there are more Ocracoke terms on Wordnik, it'd be great if they were tagged as such. :) Having just visited the place for the first time, I'm fascinated by it and its people.

    P.S. Long have I praised the work of abraxas and longed for his return. :(

    August 4, 2010

  • Hey, I didn't know it was chiefly southern.

    August 4, 2010

  • Subtle, but never gets old.

    Dad: "Do you know Smith?"
    Me: "What's his name?"
    Dad: "Who?"
    Me: "Smith."
    Dad: "No, I don't know him."

    August 4, 2010

  • It works with other things too. Like interrupting cheese.

    August 4, 2010

  • If you haven't visited their website yet, I hope you will.

    August 4, 2010

  • This word, to me at least, is disconcerting in its vague seaminess.

    August 4, 2010

  • I am two years behind adoarns. Just read this etymology today in Newsweek, in an article by Joan Huston Hall. Who, by the way, ought to be a wordnikker if she isn't already. :)

    August 4, 2010

  • My favorite was a friend of mine's; she used to say, "So the Chinese guy jumps out of the closet and yells, 'Supplies!'"

    August 2, 2010

  • reesetee, your abhorrence for perfectly innocent root vegetables is beyond unreasonable. Umbrage! Umbrage, I say! Harrumph!

    June 25, 2010

  • This is the sound chickens make. Yes it is.

    Yes it is.

    Yes it is.

    (see coccodè.)

    June 24, 2010

  • Like circus peanuts?
    *gags*

    June 24, 2010

  • One... Barrrdolph.

    June 22, 2010

  • ... no, you're right. It has never been. (More's the pity. I wanna know what that would look like.)

    June 18, 2010

  • oops, sorry I posted on the wrong page.

    June 18, 2010

  • Iron-deficiency anemia associated with puberty.

    June 18, 2010

  • Wild parsley or wild celery, formerly used medicinally.

    June 18, 2010

  • "Hannah Griffitts supported the early protests but balked at war. As a loyalist, she lambasted Tom Paine and defended tory womanhood against his aspersions:

    Of female Manners never scribble,
    Nor with thy Rudeness wound our Ear,
    Howe'er thy trimming Pen may quibble,
    The Delicate—is not thy Sphere.

    —Susan E. Klepp, Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760–1820 (Chapel Hill, N.C.: The University of North Carolina Press, for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2009), 92

    June 18, 2010

  • James Kirke Paulding told Morris Smith Miller that when he was in Washington, he would 'have some potential bouts at the mint juleps' and that he would share 'a secret by which you may get safely home after drinking six bottles. It is by just putting your feet on the edge of the table, by which means the wine is prevented from descending into the legs, thereby making them as drunk as nine pins. I have tried this method several times and do assure you, that ... you may drink up to the chin and afterwards walk home as steady as a church steeple.'
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 133

    June 18, 2010

  • The earliest concerns about alcohol in America arose in the medical community in the 1740s. Physicians, particularly Philadelphian Benjamin Rush, noted a new disease then called the West Indies dry gripes. Unbeknownst to Rush, the disease was actually lead poisoning that resulted from the use of lead in the stills that West Indies distillers used to create their rum.
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 123

    June 18, 2010

  • William Roberts advertised in the Maryland Gazette in 1745 that his servant, John Powell, had not in fact run away, but had 'only gone into the country a cider drinking' and was again prepared to repair watches and clocks.
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 122

    June 18, 2010

  • Camp followers were the wives, children, and prostitutes who followed and supplied the army to make money, assist their husbands, and support the revolution. These women washed, sewed, cooked, and brewed for the troops and nursed them when they were sick and injured. Women had long played a valuable role in provisioning the English and colonial armies and were proud of their work. For example, Martha May stressed her commitment to the army when she wrote to Henry Bouquet in 1758, 'I have been a wife 22 years to have traveled with my husband every place or country the company marched to and have worked very hard ever since I was in the army.' When Mary Cockron applied for a pension in 1837 for her own and her husband's service to the Continental Army, she stated that she 'drew her rations as other soldiers did.'
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 112

    June 18, 2010

  • Hi y'all. I'm typing in a comment in nested quotation marks (as is my wont), and it comes up without the opening and closing marks (whether they are single or double), and moreover will not let me copy/paste the citation from another entry (as is also my wont). See the poorly-formatted and uncited comment on carouse for visible evidence of my woes.

    June 18, 2010

  • "I felt very unwell, this whole day," soldiers frequently noted in their journals, "from last night's carouse."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 111

    June 18, 2010

  • I love that thing. I like visiting my profile to see it. :)

    June 18, 2010

  • *disappears into self*

    June 18, 2010

  • If I were a bear... oh wait.

    I am rather fabulans, if I do say so.

    June 18, 2010

  • Its chief weapon is surprise.

    June 16, 2010

  • Rats. I was hoping this was some kind of dinosaur for my plethora of dinosaur-themed lists.

    Is it hateful because it's the kind that went around swarming and eating farmers' crops in the 1800s?

    June 16, 2010

  • Listen. I don't know where you come from or what you drink normally, reesetee, but if you think something called "cock ale" would taste better with something other than rooster in it, I don't want to drink with you.

    June 16, 2010

  • But only the carob-flavored ones.

    June 16, 2010

  • Mphhmmm?*

    *Sorry, I'm eating some popcorn from Chicago and can't hear you over the crunching. What's this about peeling eyeballs? That weirds me out.

    June 16, 2010

  • Usage (and other alcoholic drink names) on perry.

    June 16, 2010

  • Yes, actually there's a comment about this on cock ale. That capital-letters thing is really crimping my game.

    June 16, 2010

  • Those Merriam bastards...

    June 16, 2010

  • my boobs aren't perky in Slovenian: moje joške niso vesele.

    *pointedly ignoring Prolagus's question* ;)

    June 16, 2010

  • ...With purple mountains majesty above the two cents plain!!
    —Stan Freberg

    June 16, 2010

  • Those American Heritage Dictionary bastards...

    June 15, 2010

  • ... Isabella of Australia? Or Austria?

    June 14, 2010

  • See De Quervain's tenosynovitis. Also called washerwoman's sprain.

    June 13, 2010

  • See De Quervain's tenosynovitis. Also called mother's wrist.

    June 13, 2010

  • A different condition, but found when looking up De Quervain's tenosynovitis.

    June 13, 2010

  • See De Quervain's tenosynovitis.

    June 13, 2010

  • Found here. Though I think the "D" in de should not be capped. My bad.

    June 13, 2010

  • I just visited my profile for the first time in ages. Thank you so much, happy frog! :)

    June 13, 2010

  • Seen here, in an article about the oldest leather shoe ever found. (Thanks Prolagus.)

    June 11, 2010

  • Time itself is a battle, plethora. Some days, surviving with your sanity intact is enough of a fight. :)

    June 9, 2010

  • AWWWWW!!

    June 9, 2010

  • I consider stretch marks, and indications of "working boobs" to be my battle scars. I don't want to die well-preserved and perfect-looking. I earned my silver hairs and my stretch marks and my awesome working boobs. :)

    Electricblue, I'm sure you didn't expect this kind of response... :) Best wishes.

    June 9, 2010

  • "Seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century cider presses like John Worlidge's 'ingenio for the grinding of apples' had been expensive and hard to obtain."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 108

    June 9, 2010

  • "... another author recommended that brewers purchase 'blind thermometers' in which the scale could be hidden in the brewer's or distiller's pocket so that his workers would not learn his methods and be able to found businesses of their own."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 102–103

    June 9, 2010

  • "In case any men continued to leave alcohol production to women, the new experts assured them that they were wrong. Morrice warned that 'when a butt wants fining down, many appoint a servant girl to perform that office by whom the bungs are left out, and many other acts committed, which all tend to discredit the brewer, although he does not deserve it."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 98

    I'm not sure any young servant girl ought properly to know how to fine down a butt.

    June 9, 2010

  • "Since he would show 'the manner of using the thermometer and saccharometer' 'rendered easy to any capacity,' he established himself as master of the mystery."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 97

    June 9, 2010

  • "Ball instructed his nephew to build 'a strong crotcy fence] around the trees 'to keep cattle, and horses, from tearing and barking' and killing the orchard trees."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 53

    June 9, 2010

  • Usage on scantling.

    June 9, 2010

  • "He sold cords of wood, timber trees, and products from his cooperage, including planking, lathing, clapboards, scantling, siding, heading, fence rails, fence posts, framing, and coffins."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 47

    June 9, 2010

  • "Most symbolically, Bray owned a money scale and steelyard, or balance beam scale, to weigh and balance accounts. Just as a ring of keys and a pocket were the signs of the housewife's labor in dispensing foodstuffs from cupboards, so the money scale and steelyards were the symbol of the planter-merchant who weighed coins and crops."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 45

    June 9, 2010

  • Usage on medlar.

    June 9, 2010

  • "In 1736, an English traveler in the Chesapeake recorded that 'we gathered a fruit, in our route, called a parsimon sic, of a very delicious taste, not unlike a medlar, tho' somewhat larger: I take it to be a very cooling fruit, and the settlers make use of prodigious quantities to sweeten a beer ... which is vastly wholesome.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 38

    June 9, 2010

  • "Doctors began prescribing cider to sailors in the late seventeenth century because of its supposed antiscorbutic properties."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 31

    June 9, 2010

  • "...Men and women both drank at the popular outdoor meal called a barbeque, 'an entertainment' that, as one traveler describes, 'generally ends in intoxication.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 18

    June 9, 2010

  • "Mustering men mixed some of their brandy charcoal, saltpetre, sulfur, cobine nitre, and brandy to make gunpowder."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 17

    June 9, 2010

  • "The legislature required white men to drill with a militia in case of Indian attacks, and the resulting militia days offered another chance to imbibe.... Alcoholic beverages were such an intrinsic part of the militia muster that boys playing 'militia' ended their games with rounds of drinks."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 16

    June 9, 2010

  • "'We had several sorts of liquors, namely Virginia red wine and white wine, Irish usquebaugh, brandy, shrub, two sorts of rum, champagne, canary, cherry punch, cider.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 15

    June 9, 2010

  • "Landon Carter had better luck when he gave his cow 'with the blind staggers' three doses of warm beer with rattlesnake root, after which the cow 'got pretty well and feeds about as usual.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 15

    June 9, 2010

  • A fine quotation on kibe-heel.

    June 9, 2010

  • "Rum, wrote traveler Edward Ward, was 'adored by the American English... 'tis held as the comforter of their souls, the preserver of their bodies, the remover of their cares, and promoter of their mirth; and is a sovereign remedy against the grumbling of guts, a kibe-heel chilblain or a wounded conscience, which are three epidemical distempers that afflict the country.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 14

    June 9, 2010

  • Usage on salt tartar.

    June 9, 2010

  • "Planter Landon Carter treated both his daughter and his slaves with alcoholic concoctions. When his daughter, Judy, was sick in 1757, Carter treated her with a 'weak julep of rum with salt tartar and pulvis castor.'"
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 14

    June 9, 2010

  • And of course it grows in Virginia, where Jamestown is located. :)

    June 7, 2010

  • "Even colonists with access to milk often avoided it because of fears of 'milk sickness' caused by consuming the milk of cows that had grazed on wild jimson weed."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 12

    June 7, 2010

  • "Rum or arrack, an alcohol distilled from the fermented sap of palm trees, was mixed with sugar, citrus juice, water, and spices to make punch."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 11

    June 7, 2010

  • "Persico was a cordial flavored with the crushed kernels of peaches, apricots, or nectarines."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 11

    June 7, 2010

  • "Red hippocras was made of claret, brandy, sugar, spices, almonds, and new milk."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 11

    June 7, 2010

  • Usage on perry.

    June 7, 2010

  • Usage on perry, where it says it was brewed from pears, and also:
    "William Cabell's Amherst County, Virginia plantation fermented 3,000 gallons of cider and fifty hogsheads (at least 2,400 gallons) of peach mobby annually."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 50

    June 6, 2010

  • "The English brewed perry or mobby from pears, and mead and methelin from fermented honey. Aquavit was a distilled ale, like a whiskey, based on fermented grain. Mum was brewed from wheat; juniper ale was flavored with juniper berries, bay leaves, coriander, and caraway seeds. Buttered ale was ale flavored with cinnamon, sugar, and butter. Cock ale was a mixture of ale and wine, steeped with raisins, cloves, and its namesake, a cooked rooster."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 11

    June 6, 2010

  • Usage on alembic.

    Also,
    "The introduction of the Hewes (sometimes spelled Hughes) crab apple to the region in the mid-eighteenth century allowed planters to produce a sweeter, slightly cinnamon-tasting cider that lasted longer."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 108

    June 6, 2010

  • See Hewes crab apple.

    June 6, 2010

  • "Small-planter households resented their dependence on large-planter households. Although the Chesapeake continued to lag behind Europe, the arrival during the second half of the eighteenth century of the three-gallon alembic still, a series of improved cider presses, the newly developed Hewes crab apple, and other technologies allowed small-planter households to become more self-sufficient. They developed alcohol trade networks with kin and people of their own kind."
    —Sarah Hand Meacham, Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), 4

    Also,
    "The invention of the alembic still, or side distilling, in particular, made the process easier. Side distilling became known in England around 1720, but it was not practiced in the Chesapeake until the 1760s. Before the invention of side distilling, stills were very large and expensive pieces of equipment, and distilling was a complex process...." (103)

    June 6, 2010

  • my boobs aren't perky in Icelandic: bobbingar mín eru ekki perky

    June 4, 2010

  • Three cheers for freedom of speech for eighteenth-century French encyclopedic smut! The "18th" volume of Diderot's Encyclopedié is the "censored" stuff. NOW ONLINE!! WOOOOOO!!!

    June 4, 2010

  • my boobs aren't perky in Hebrew: הציצים שלי הם לא עליז

    June 4, 2010

  • Ahh, f#$% them. :) That's what Wordnik is for. Well... that's what Wordie was for, anyhow.

    June 3, 2010

  • Thanks for the pile of stuff you added. I love when I stop by and the front page is riddled with hernesheir-isms. :) So much fun to read!

    June 2, 2010

  • What an unfortunate website: tappening.com. (Should we tell them?)

    June 1, 2010

  • Yes.

    And No, I will not use your stupid website to keep track of the movies I've seen. Can't you see I have a perfectly good list on Wordnik?

    June 1, 2010

  • You know, this usage is on the word page. Kind of interesting:
    Then she desired her not to be sparing with the 'smegma', -- A material like soap, but used in a soft state. -- and to wash her hair as thoroughly as possible. —The Bride of the Nile — Volume 10

    May 28, 2010

  • Every time I see this I want to sing, "E-I, E-I-O!"

    May 27, 2010

  • Seen here.

    May 27, 2010

  • Also tagliulini.

    May 26, 2010

  • *yoink* Thanks bilby!

    May 26, 2010

  • Usage/citation on quadrucci.

    May 26, 2010

  • Usage/citation on quadrucci.

    May 26, 2010

  • Usage/citation on quadrucci.

    May 26, 2010

  • Citation/usage on quadrucci.

    May 26, 2010

  • Sadly, that line of Madmartigan's is all in the delivery.

    May 26, 2010

  • ... this is rather greater than the sum of its parts. Or should I say, rather more bizarre.

    May 25, 2010

  • "... Unless to spy my shadow in the sun
    And descant on mine own deformity...."
    Richard III, William Shakespeare

    May 25, 2010

  • I do. I just ran into him at the coffee maker. Hard.

    May 25, 2010

  • blahahaha!

    Yeah, sionnach. You should really try to be more, you know, clear.

    *looking for the "like" button on Eurotrash assmarmot*

    May 20, 2010

  • It ain't the size, reesetee, it's the number. Eugh.

    May 20, 2010

  • Right. So you're dissipating tension, or defusing a situation.

    May 19, 2010

  • I think it matters. If you're defusing, I'd say "the situation" should be the object--as thtownse says, as if the situation were going to explode--but if you want to do something to the tension, it seems like diffuse is the way to go. Tension doesn't really explode.

    It does, however, get thick. I mean, I guess so. People say so, anyhow.

    May 19, 2010

  • Well, welcome to Wordnik, but you're not likely to find someone to do your homework for you. :)

    May 19, 2010

  • well, the things I kept near my computer were a fife and a set of drumsticks and practice pad.

    May 19, 2010

  • Someone needs to read her that Hans Christian Andersen story where the "idiot" wins the princess and the kingdom because he spares the ants from suffering his stupid feet.

    May 19, 2010

  • I used to purposely keep my stuff right near my computer so whenever the urge struck, I'd play some sweet sweet loudness to wash away the computer blues.

    Also because hay makes me sneeze.

    May 19, 2010

  • I just can't figure out the lavender waistcoat.

    He does come with a scroll of the Emancipation Proclamation, that would probably fit in his large, beefy mitts, if I ever open the package to see.

    May 19, 2010

  • Why? Don't you like squeezing fake vultures?

    May 19, 2010

  • For voting at the end of this year, "Best Use of the Word Craudestopper 2010." (P.S. Vote for Milos.)

    May 19, 2010

  • Really? You should just play the instruments, instead of the list.
    ;)
    (insert upper-class twit laugh here)

    May 18, 2010

  • Yes, kind of like the Mandles list.

    May 18, 2010

  • This sounds really really neat.

    May 18, 2010

  • I'm *always* looking for fritos.

    I had a gerbil named Frito, or rather frito. She was very nice. Her beau was named Je Ne Sais Quoi (je ne sais quoi).

    May 18, 2010

  • regretting that I did, actually.

    May 18, 2010

  • Usage on Bosti Khel.

    May 18, 2010

  • Usage on Bosti Khel.

    May 18, 2010

  • "The brothers, members of the warlike Bosti Khel tribe (a sub-tribe of the Afridis, themselves a sub-tribe of the Pathans), had been implicated in the recent theft of some rifles from a police station."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 245

    May 18, 2010

  • "When one male hostage protested at the continuous moves one of Akbar's cohorts snarled that 'as long as there is an Afghan prisoner in India or a Feringhee foreign soldier in Afghanistan, so long will we retain you...'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 241

    May 18, 2010

  • "'As no one would fight for the ladies,' she sniffed disapprovingly, obviously referring to the men of the party, 'I determined to be yaghi rebellious myself'."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 240

    May 18, 2010

  • "'Many camels were killed. On one camel were, in one kajava (pannier), Mrs Boyd and her youngest boy Hugh...'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 237

    May 18, 2010

  • Usage on poshteen.

    May 18, 2010

  • "Lady Sale noted matter-of-factly that she herself 'had fortunately only one ball in my arm; three others passed through my poshteen (fur pelisse) near the shoulder without doing me any injury'."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 237

    May 18, 2010

  • I'm reminded of a grade-school classmate who, when tasked with making a poster for the church bazaar, made a delightfully artistic and well-lettered one for a local grocery store that said "Church Bizarre." I thought for sure they wouldn't use it, but they did.

    May 18, 2010

  • "Although rumblings had been apparent for some time among discontented sepoys (Indian infantrymen) and in the bazaars, few of the ruling political class or the military hierarchy suspected that a widespread uprising would ensue."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 214

    May 18, 2010

  • "Fanny Duberly received an invitation from the Rao (ruler) of Burj when she accompanied her husband's regiment on campaign through India in 1858. As the only white woman with the column, she was an object of curiosity to the locals as much as they were to her. To her delight, she was invited into the ladies' apartments to meet the ranees (the rao's wives). 'I never saw such a profusion of jewellery in my life,' she marvelled...."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 195

    May 18, 2010

  • Usage on ranee.

    May 18, 2010

  • "Mrs Ilbert, arriving in Quebec in 1807, was pleased to learn that even in winter, 'There are frequently very pleasant excursions, made by parties into the country, they are Pic Nic parties where each person takes something towards the Entertainment, they drive to some house a few miles from Quebec, carry a Fidler with them & when they have finished their repast, they rise & dance until they agree upon separating, when the curricles (carriages) are ordered & the parties jovially return to their habitations, some get overturned but no accidents are ever met with but they only fall on a bed of snow, have a roll or two, to the great amusement of the Spectators, get up, shake themselves & resume their Seats.'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 193–194

    May 18, 2010

  • "Copies of Tatler and Vogue, posted by helpful relatives at home, were presented to durzis (tailors) who would be able to produce passable imitations within a few days."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 192

    May 18, 2010

  • "Mrs Z was 'simply attired in a plain coloured gown made of a very few yards of sarcenet.'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 192

    May 18, 2010

  • "It was a time when the army was engaged in a fierce campaign against the tribesmen of Waziristan, and every fortnight a new lot of officers came down to Rawalpindi on leave with money to spend. As she admits, 'Even I got worn out, dancing and poodlefaking flirting. . . I'd wear a different evening dress every night—it was like being a debutante.'"
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 191

    May 18, 2010

  • "It is better to have cheap things, as they get ruined here, and not too long skirts. You want a sort of table d'hote gown for dinner, old summer gowns would do."
    —Annabel Venning, Following the Drum: The Lives of Army Wives and Daughters Past and Present (London: Headline, 2005), 188

    May 18, 2010

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