isoglossian has looked up 134 words, created 9 lists, listed 196 words, written 35 comments, added 37 tags, and loved 11 words.

Comments by isoglossian

  • You've made a wonderful collection of lists~

    January 17, 2010

  • I came across this in Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 066601 (2005), Orbitronics: The Intrinsic Orbital Current in p-Doped Silicon, but don't know whether it's the first to mention this term.

    July 17, 2009

  • First appeared in Phys. Rev. A 75, 023615 (2007), Atomtronics: Ultracold-atom analogs of electronic devices

    July 17, 2009

  • suggest the addition of self-awareness

    June 30, 2009

  • Where there is a "-phile", there is a "-phobe", not always~

    June 27, 2009

  • suggest adding the word "celadon", also a beautiful color with translucent texture~

    June 10, 2009

  • a small book with loose sheets of paper, or a very small computer, for recording information, addresses, meetings etc, a famous trademark being Filofax.

    --Adapted from LDOCE

    June 7, 2009

  • To seanahan, either Wikipedia or the language needs improvement~

    To rolig, I agree with you and every now and then I take pleasure in overinterpreting these ambiguities~

    May 21, 2009

  • I always wonder if there is some kind of word-formation technique corresponding to this word. I'll be verihappy if there is~

    May 17, 2009

  • I found one example from Wikipedia for avoiding ambiguity. Consider the following sentences:
    To my parents, Ayn Rand and God.
    To my parents, Ayn Rand, and God.
    the second comma before "and" in the second sentence should be the oxford/harvard comma~

    May 17, 2009

  • Recently it has featured in M-W's Word of the Day, see here

    May 16, 2009

  • also known as "atmospheric seeing"~More on Wiki. I came upon this in the series of articles by Hanbury Brown & Twiss~

    May 11, 2009

  • I bet the most famous quotation about this word appeared in chapter 6 of <Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows>, when Harry said to Ginny, "Someone else might kill off Voldemort while she(Mrs Weasley)’s holding us here making vol-au-vents?"

    May 11, 2009

  • free both physically and emotionally

    May 8, 2009

  • "on(=pon) the(=de) replay" as in one of the interview with Rihanna. It's Barbadian English, anyway~ In the lyrics there is also "...pon the dancefloor"

    May 1, 2009

  • Can every "-on" have its equivalent "-onics"? There should be a technologically accessible source to make "-onics" physically feasible~

    May 1, 2009

  • Probably coined by the Nobelist Frank Wilczek in one of his articles published in 2006 on 《Physics World》, an internet version can be seen here. Certainly this follows electronics and its more recent derivatives like photonics and even phononics. Although the formation is a bit like cliche, this is really a cool idea to physicists at first sight~

    April 30, 2009

  • Might be a single word containing most vs. Another I could think of is vavavoom~

    April 30, 2009

  • somewhat similar to the concept of placebo~

    April 30, 2009

  • also known as "Four Pillars of Destiny" and in Chinese, "时辰八字" or "生辰八字"

    April 30, 2009

  • I suggest the addition of marmoreal~

    April 30, 2009

  • ...globalized by Rihanna's "Pon de Replay"~

    April 30, 2009

  • Please see its Wiki entry here

    April 25, 2009

  • I understand what you mean by "codes" and the meaning of "meaningless" and can agree with that. But I fear that logically saying "meaningless has meaning" or "meaningless is meaningful" would result in a similar example of Grelling-Nelson paradox, which happens to the pair--autological and heterological. Maybe there's no paradox, it's just that I haven't thought it through~

    April 25, 2009

  • after Wolfgang Pauli~

    April 25, 2009

  • How smart is "smart power"?

    April 25, 2009

  • I can agree with your dislike about the word-formation. I think I'm not wordie enough to find what they are using in cognitive science now. However, I do think what Mr Shermer means by "meaningless" is about the absence of physical/mathematical meaning, or physically significant meaning, except using one's imagination~

    You may ask whether "meaningless" is autological, or whether "meaningless" is meaningless, that's a good question, but that's linguistics~

    April 25, 2009

  • heterological should be neither autological or heterological, see the Wiki entry of Grelling-Nelson paradox.

    April 25, 2009

  • Michael Shermer defined it in the December 2008 issue of Scientific American as "the tendency to find meaningful patterns in meaningless noise". For more see here.
    An indeed interest idea, but I don't think it's brand new, even though I couldn't find any precursing phrases with similar meaning~

    April 25, 2009

  • So seanahan, I think the most distinct difference I'm able to grasp from these two words is(I'm not a psychology major, anyway~) whether it is dominated by consciousness. retrospective falsification is an unconscious behavior and I came upon that in a documentary on (mildly debunking) extrasensory perception(ESP). A psychologist disagreeing with the possibility of someone predicting the future(especially some disastrous events) gave another explanation on the "predictors"' claims using this phrase. He said that the predictors may unconsciouslly rearranged their memory to better fit their claims, without self-awareness. There is a Chinese phrase that I can think of called "事�?�诸葛亮" has a similar connotation to retrospective falsification but with derogative tone. (I'm wondering if there are wordies for other languages like Chinese and there might be crosslinks between different languages which I don't think Wikipedia has even achieved, maybe I could make one~) And from my understanding of cognitive dissonance I think it should be a conscious behaviour, even though it is still very vague to know, let alone to prove, how is conscious and how is unconscious. Additionally, they may be different in emphases and effective situations or context(trivial).

    Concepts are all degenerated at the very beginning(maybe the singularity before the Big Bang), uh hmm...

    April 11, 2009

  • The Wiki definition.

    April 11, 2009

  • a recurring pattern that contains itself within itself(and can also contain even smaller replica ad infinitum), like a picture within a picture, a TV within a TV(as in some sitcom or music video), etc. More information can be found hither and thither

    April 10, 2009

  • Thanks, VanishedOne, I got it. Are there other codes or lists of them?

    April 10, 2009

  • It is also called motion sickness, with representations like car sickness, seasickness, etc(but don't mess it up with homesickness). See here

    April 10, 2009

  • Definition is found here

    April 9, 2009

  • The unconscious distortion of past experience to conform to present psychological needs.

    April 9, 2009

Comments for isoglossian

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  • It caught my eye when you used "Ayn Rand" in your example of an oxford comma (the use of which I'm in favor, by the way).

    Apparently I need to go to bed. Just saw that you took that example from Wikipedia.

    May 17, 2009