Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A four-wheeled carriage with a collapsible top, two double seats inside opposite each other, and a box seat outside in front for the driver.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage with collapsible half-hood, two double seats facing each other, and an outside seat for the driver.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A four-wheeled carriage, with a falling top, a seat on the outside for the driver, and two double seats on the inside arranged so that the sitters on the front seat face those on the back seat.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A large four-wheeled carriage with a falling or folding top over the back seat, and the seats arranged as in a coach.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a horse-drawn carriage having four wheels; has an outside seat for the driver and facing inside seats for two couples and a folding top

Etymologies

German Barutsche, from Italian biroccio, from Vulgar Latin *birotium, from Late Latin birotus, two-wheeled : Latin bi-, bi-; see dwo- in Indo-European roots + Latin rota, wheel; see ret- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From dialectal German Barutsche, from Italian baroccio, from Late Latin *birotium < Latin birotus ("chariot"), from bi- ("two") + rota ("wheel"). Though Frenchified in English, the word was not of French origin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Fastened up behind the barouche was a hamper of spacious dimensions — one of those hampers which always awakens in a contemplative mind associations connected with cold fowls, tongues, and bottles of wine — and on the box sat a fat and red – faced boy, in

    The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

  • My father, yielding to my entreaties, has given me the prettiest turnout in Paris — two dapple-gray horses and a barouche, which is a masterpiece of elegance.

    Letters of Two Brides

  • Pitched under the shade of some wide-spreading mangoes are a variety of tents of all sizes, from the handsome and spacious marquee to the snug sleeping tent; near them are picqueted a number of fine-looking Arab horses in prime condition, while the large barouche, which is standing close by, might have just emerged from a coach-house in a London mews; a few servants are loitering about, and give life to this otherwise tranquil scene.

    A Journey to Katmandu (the Capital of Napaul), with The Camp of Jung Bahadoor; including A Sketch of the Nepaulese Ambassador at Home

  • Now, what still more interested him was the fact that, on the panel of the barouche were the arms of the family now in possession of the estate of Smithell's; so that the young lady, his new acquaintance, or the young lady, her seeming friend, one or the other, was the sister of the present owner of that estate.

    Sketches and Studies

  • Now, what still more interested him was the fact that, on the panel of the barouche were the arms of the family now in possession of the estate of

    Sketches and Studies

  • My father, yielding to my entreaties, has given me the prettiest turnout in Paris -- two dapple-gray horses and a barouche, which is a masterpiece of elegance.

    Letters of Two Brides

  • Yet, at the very same time, it has already appeared from your argument that twelve hundred thousand will command only one barouche; that is, a barouche will at one and the same time be worth twelve hundred thousand besoms, and worth only one fourth part of that quantity.

    Memorials and Other Papers — Complete

  • Fastened up behind the barouche was a hamper of spacious dimensions -- one of those hampers which always awakens in a contemplative mind associations connected with cold fowls, tongues, and bottles of wine -- and on the box sat a fat and red-faced boy, in a state of somnolency, whom no speculative observer could have regarded for an instant without setting down as the official dispenser of the contents of the before-mentioned hamper, when the proper time for their consumption should arrive.

    The Pickwick Papers

  • "You must come, Vivian: so make your fellow put your worldly goods into my barouche, which is at the door; and we are to have a great party at

    Tales and Novels — Volume 05

  • "barouche," drawn by two satin-smooth, fat animals, more like tightly covered yet comfortable brown sofas than horses.

    The Guests Of Hercules

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